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Selecting Technologies

Selecting Technologies
This page helps you choose among various technologies (not just LMSs) using two approaches: examples of learning outcomes, the kinds of learning activities that could achieve those outcomes, and how those activities could be supported by various learning technologies examples of the tools you may be interested in using and the types of activities and learning outcomes that are likely to be relevant. Table 1: Sample learning outcomes, rationales and activities The following table provides examples of learning outcomes, the kinds of learning activities that promote those outcomes, and how the activities could be supported by learning technologies. Table 2: Tools related to activities, and their contribution to learning outcomes The following table provides examples of the tools you may be interested in using and looks at the types of activities and learning outcomes that are likely to be relevant. See also on this section of the website:

https://teaching.unsw.edu.au/selecting-technologies

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JOLT - Journal of Online Learning and Teaching Natalia V. Smirnova Instructor of English as a Second Language Department of Foreign Languages National Research University Higher School of Economics Saint Petersburg RUSSIA smirnovan@hse.ru Irina V. Nuzha Associate Professor of Teaching English as a Second Language Department of Foreign Languages National Research University Higher School of Economics Saint Petersburg RUSSIA inuzha@hse.ru Introduction Presentation skills have gained attention both in higher education and among business trainers, as they constitute one of the core competencies of a professional (Linardopoulos, 2010; Raybould & Sheedy, 2005). Integrating Web 2.0 Tools into the Classroom: Changing the Culture of Learning June 1, 2010 This report presents findings from a two-year investigation of the ways in which Web 2.0 tools and social networking technologies are being used to support teaching and learning in classrooms across the United States. With funding from Intel®, the Education Development Center's Center for Children and Technology (EDC/CCT) interviewed or visited over 30 educators in 22 different schools throughout the country as they employed these tools in their classrooms in innovative ways. We also spoke with and observed a number of students in these schools. Currently, there is much discussion and excitement about Web 2.0 in education, but we still know very little about how these tools actually work in the classroom.

eltchat The aim was to create a freely available social network for ELT professionals offering mutual support and opportunities for Continuous Professional Development. Now, every Wednesday at 19:00pm GMT or 21.00pm GMT, ELT teachers from all over the world log into their Twitter account and for one hour hold an online discussion on a topic they have selected. To join in you just have to follow the hashtag #ELTChat. You'll see the conversation and anything you tag with #ELTChat will be part of it The Teacher's Guide To Flipped Classrooms Since Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams first experimented with the idea in their Colorado classrooms in 2004, flipped learning has exploded onto the larger educational scene. It’s been one of the hottest topics in education for several years running and doesn’t seem to be losing steam. Basically, it all started when Bergman and Sams first came across a technology that makes it easy to record videos.

Studies of e-portfolio implementation (videos and toolkit) Two online resources providing guidance on large-scale implementation of e-portfolio tools in UK further and higher education are available to supplement the 2008 JISC publication, Effective Practice with e-Portfolios The online resources, five video case-studies and an online toolkit for managers and practitioners, explore the issues, challenges and benefits of scaling up e-portfolio use across a university or college, and offer opportunities to explore the pros and cons of different approaches and methodologies. The e-Portfolio Implementation Toolkit The e-Portfolio Implementation Toolkit1 is the output from the JISC-funded e-Portfolio Implementation (ePI) study2 led by the University of Nottingham.

Collaboration and competition on a wiki: The praxis of online social learning to improve academic writing and research in under-graduate students Collaboration and competition on a wiki: The praxis of online social learning to improve academic writing and research in under-graduate students Julie-Anne Carroll, Abbey Diaz, Judith Meiklejohn, Michelle Newcomb, Barbara Adkins Abstract The Teacher's Quick Guide To Digital Scavenger Hunts If you’ve got a smartphone or a tablet in your classroom, you’re ready for the adventure to begin! By adventure I mean, of course, the world of active learning through digital scavenger hunts. In this hunt, students are tasked with finding a particular physical object, person, or place and have to use technology to track it down. Note: an ‘online scavenger hunt’ usually implies that you’re hunting around online and not physically with classmates. For the purpose of this article, I’m focusing on the physical version I’ve dubbed ‘digital scavenger hunts’. The Simple Goal

Teaching Using Google Glass and Apps Creating a platform to enable the fluid and continuous exchange of ideas and information. Can the use of devices such as Glass add pedagogical value (Video 1)? As a wearable computer, the Glass screen can be used to provide an educator with key or supplemental information during a talk, lecture, or discussion. It is also being used by instructors to demonstrate specific skills, interview experts, and allow students to view distant sites (such as CERN in Switzerland – a feature temporarily suspended due to poor user experience). Examples of these uses and more can be found on forums such as Google Glass in Education.

Using VoiceThread to Build Student Engagement - Faculty Focus Online educators have long known that asynchronous discussion is deeper than face-to-face discussion due to the increased thought time and the “democratization” of the classroom. But one major disadvantage of traditional online discussion is that it is separate from the lecture. Students in a face-to-face classroom can stop the instructor during the lecture to ask questions, whereas students in an online classroom generally read or watch the lecture at one time and then discuss it in a separate forum later. Any questions or thoughts that the students have during the lecture are generally forgotten by the time that the students reach discussion.

20/20: Costs and Funding of Virtual Schools Amy Berk Anderson, John Augenblick, Dale DeCesare, and Jill Conrad – Virtual schools are providing individual online instruction and increasing access to courses by providing flexibility in time, place and pace of instruction. In 2006, 24 states offer some form of statewide virtual schooling to supplement regular classes and provide for special needs and well over half of all states have significant online learning programs at the state or district level. In its school finance work around the country, Augenblick, Palaich, and Associates (APA) was increasingly being asked about virtual schools—in particular, what we knew about the funding of such schools.

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