background preloader

GCSE Bitesize - Germany 1918 - 1939

GCSE Bitesize - Germany 1918 - 1939

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history/mwh/germany/

Related:  Key topic 1: The Weimar Republic 1918-2911 HISTORY

Kaiser Wilhelm II - Homework week 1 CHALLENGING Kaiser Wilhelm II was born in Potsdam, Germany, on January 27, 1859, the son of Prince Frederick Wilhelm of Prussia (1831-88) and Princess Victoria (1840-1901), the oldest daughter of Queen Victoria of England (1819-1901). The future monarch was the queen’s firstborn grandchild and was genuinely fond of her; in fact, he was holding her in his arms when she died. His ties to Britain through its royal family would play an important part in his later political maneuvering. Wilhelm’s childhood was shaped by two events, one medical and one political. His birth had been traumatic; in the course of a complicated delivery, the doctor permanently damaged Wilhelm’s left arm. In addition to its smaller size, the arm was useless for such ordinary tasks as cutting certain foods with a knife at mealtime.

Four Corners 50 Years - Home Welcome to a celebration of 50 years of ABC Television’s premier News and Current Affairs program, Four Corners. This website is a celebration of our history, which is not only TV programs, it is the successful collaboration of people: executive producers, reporters, researchers, editors, producers, crews and administrators, all of whom have played a significant role in the program’s history, identity and success, from 1961 to the present day. Four Corners’ reports have explored cultural and social change, political upheaval, conflicts, disasters and terrorism, with an eye on national and international events. This website will showcase the key stories, people and events we have covered over the past 50 years, and will stand as a living archive to five decades of vigorous reporting on ABC TV. You can explore our vast archive of programs by decade or by theme. The website also presents extended interviews with reporters, executive reporters, researchers and cameramen.

The Young Plan 1929 The Young Plan 1929 The Dawes Plan had attempted to deal with the massive inflation and large-scale unemployment in Germany that had been caused by reparations ordered as part of the Treaty of Versailles. However, the German government continued to complain at the level of reparations. In 1929 the Allied Reparations Committee asked an American banker, Owen D.

Our War: 10 Years in Afghanistan Series marking the ten-year anniversary of the war in Afghanistan, telling the story of the conflict through the words and pictures of the young soldiers themselves. Ambushed - This opening part of the series tells the story of a close-knit group of friends from 3 Platoon, 1st Battalion Royal Anglian regiment, who were sent to Helmand province in 2007. For most of them it was their first experience of war. The whole tour was filmed on a helmet camera by the platoon's sergeant, who captured the moment when one of his men, 19-year-old Private Chris Gray, was killed in a Taliban ambush. Germany joins the League of Nations 1926 In 1924, the newly appointed foreign minister of Germany, Gustav Stresemann, adopted a new policy toward the League of Nations, which governments in Berlin previously had spurned as an instrument created by the victors of World War I to suppress the defeated Germans. In December 1924, Stresemann dispatched an application for Germany’s admission to the League, but on the condition that it also be made a member of the League Council. This request was denied, but in early 1925 Stresemann made a second attempt. The path to German membership in the League was cleared by the Locarno Conference of October 1925, which resulted in a series of treaties that entered into effect on September 14, 1926. In the most important of these agreements, usually referred to as the Locarno Pact, France, Germany, Belgium, Great Britain, and Italy guaranteed the western frontier of Germany, which was declared inviolable.

The Fog of War In this grimly compelling film, documentary filmmaker Errol Morris tackles one of his most perplexing and ambiguous subjects: former defense secretary Robert McNamara, widely identified (and in many quarters reviled) as the architect of the Vietnam War. The octogenarian McNamara, a former head of Ford Motor Co. whose government service began during World War II, is filmed via Morris's invention, the Interrotron, a device that allows interviewer and subject to look into each other's eyes while also staring directly into the camera lens. This enables the subject to maintain eye contact with the audience, and given the frequently disturbing nature of McNamara's revelations, it makes for quite an eerie viewing experience. He discusses at length the Allied campaign against Japan in WWII, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the costly, protracted conflict in Vietnam. From his musings Morris extrapolates 11 lessons, which are presented one at a time to impose film structure.

World War One - What is a Trench? Trench warfare characterised much of the fighting during World War One, particularly along the Western Front. Trench systems were complicated with many interlinking lines of trenches. Front Line Trench Cross Section Visual essay-writing: cartoons, sticky-notes and plenty of collaboration! To develop analytical and essay-writing skills in a collaborative and engaging manner, start by gathering a series of photographs relating to the topic in question: A pile of cartoons and photographs (maybe about 20 of these)PodcastsVideo clipsTextbooksArticles Next, divide the class into groups. Within each group, three students should be responsible for organising the cartoons into meaningful categories to answer the key question for the lesson (in the photograph shown here, cartoons are being organised into meaningful categories to help understand “Why was the Marshall Plan so controversial?”). Whilst the ‘cartoonists’ are busy discussing how to arrange the images meaningfully, another student should be listening to the podcasts, another watching the video, another reading the article, and another reading a textbook (it is a good idea to let students choose the task they are most comfortable with, as far as possible). (Viewed 190 times)

A Life Stranger Than the Movie, 'Europa, Europa,' Based on It LODZ, Poland— The truth of Solomon Perel's life is even stranger than the movie. Mr. Perel was the inspiration for the film "Europa, Europa," the tale of a young German Jew trapped by the shifting front lines of World War II who passes himself off as Aryan and ends up in the Hitler Youth.

India 1900 to 1947 In 1900, India was part of the British Empire; but by the end of 1947, India had achieved independence. For most of the Nineteenth Century, India was ruled by the British. India was considered the jewel in the crown of the British Empire. Queen Victoria had been made Empress of India and the British had a major military presence in India. Indian nationals had no say in central government and even at a local level, their influence on policy and decision making was minimal.

Related: