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12 things white people can do now because Ferguson - Quartz

12 things white people can do now because Ferguson - Quartz
As we all know by now, Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenage boy, was gunned down by the police while walking to his grandmother’s house in the middle of the afternoon. For the past few days my Facebook newsfeed has been full of stories about the incidents unfolding in Ferguson, Missouri. But then I realized something. For the first couple of days, almost all of the status updates expressing anger and grief about yet another extrajudicial killing of an unarmed black boy, the news articles about the militarized police altercations with community members and the horrifying pictures of his dead body on the city concrete were posted by people of color. Outpourings of rage and demands for justice were voiced by black people, Latinos, Asian Americans, Arab American Muslims. They have nothing to say? Why? However, I think the explanation is more complex and mirrors the silence of many people that I witness in real life. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. People are literally dying.

http://janeewoods.com/2014/08/14/becoming-a-white-ally-to-black-people-in-the-aftermath-of-the-michael-brown-murder/

Related:  White PrivilegeEgo & Pain BodyPeople of Color

Straight White Male: The Lowest Difficulty Setting There Is I’ve been thinking of a way to explain to straight white men how life works for them, without invoking the dreaded word “privilege,” to which they react like vampires being fed a garlic tart at high noon. It’s not that the word “privilege” is incorrect, it’s that it’s not their word. When confronted with “privilege,” they fiddle with the word itself, and haul out the dictionaries and find every possible way to talk about the word but not any of the things the word signifies. So, the challenge: how to get across the ideas bound up in the word “privilege,” in a way that your average straight white man will get, without freaking out about it? Being a white guy who likes women, here’s how I would do it:

What It's Like To Be A Principal Of Color Dealing With White Parents In a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood in northwest D.C., a parent attending a school meeting is angry that her child doesn’t have enough time to play at recess. She berates the school principal — a black woman nearly a foot shorter than she is — in front of the other parents, pointing a finger no more than two inches away from her face and shouting, “How do you expect to keep your job?” The principal has been at her new job for no more than five weeks, and recess time is unfortunately out of her control due to academic requirements for other parts of the school schedule and other factors.

Trangender vs. Transracial: Caitlyn Jenner &... Trangender vs. Transracial: Caitlyn Jenner & Rachel Dolezal So many of my notifications on all forms of social media this morning are talking about this woman: Explaining White Privilege to a Broke White Person... Years ago, some feminist on the internet told me I was "Privileged." "THE FUCK!?!?" I said. I came from the kind of Poor that people don't want to believe still exists in this country. Have you ever spent a frigid northern Illinois winter without heat or running water?

The Liberal Blind Spot Photo CLASSIC liberalism exalted tolerance, reflected in a line often (and probably wrongly) attributed to Voltaire: “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.” On university campuses, that is sometimes updated to: “I disapprove of what you say, so shut up.” In a column a few weeks ago, I offered “a confession of liberal intolerance,” criticizing my fellow progressives for promoting all kinds of diversity on campuses — except ideological. I argued that universities risk becoming liberal echo chambers and hostile environments for conservatives, and especially for evangelical Christians.

Rachel Dolezal, Caitlyn Jenner: How transgender is different from “transracial.” Photo illustration by Slate. Photo by Annie Leibovitz/Vanity Fair/Handout via Reuters, Tyler Tjomsland/The Spokesman-Review via AP. The story of a white woman who seems to have fake-tanned and permed her way into a position as a black civil rights activist in Spokane, Washington, was too juicy to ignore.

The Economic Impact of School Suspensions The reasons for such setbacks have less to do with student behavior, the report's authors argue, than with disproportionate and overly punitive disciplinary practices that remove African-Americans from classes for minor and subjective infractions (examples include violations of dress code or even wearing natural hairstyles). "Traditional" middle-class notions of femininity, which value passivity in girls, can clash with stereotypical images of African-American females as loud, assertive, and provocative, and generate differing punishments for similar conduct, the authors note. Subjective offenses like "disobedience" or "disruptive behavior" may signify little more than a student's failure to conform to dominant gender norms or fit a teacher's view of what constitutes appropriate "feminine" behavior.

WATCH: Jesse Williams On Black Lives, Equal Rights And Freedom At the BET Awards on Sunday night, after receiving the network's humanitarian award, Jesse Williams began with the usual litany of thanks. Standing with a slight hunch over a too-short microphone, he celebrated his parents and his wife. With that out of the way, the real speech began. 11 Ways White America Avoids Taking Responsibility for its Racism I am white. I write and teach about what it means to be white in a society that proclaims race meaningless, yet remains deeply divided by race. A fundamental but very challenging part of my work is moving white people from an individual understanding of racism—i.e. only some people are racist and those people are bad—to a structural understanding. A structural understanding recognizes racism as a default system that institutionalizes an unequal distribution of resources and power between white people and people of color.

How Our Brains Perceive Race This post first appeared at Mother Jones. Hiphop dance troupe at Pacific Northwest Black Community Festival, Seattle, 2010. (Photo: Joe Mabel/flickr CC 2.0) “You’re not, like, a total racist bastard,” David Amodio tells me. He pauses.

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