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Integrated PBL Projects: A Full-Course Meal!

Integrated PBL Projects: A Full-Course Meal!
In the project-based learning field, we use the metaphor that projects are the "main course, not the dessert" (as coined in an article from the Buck Institute for Education). Projects are intended to create the need-to-know content and skills, and the opportunity for students to learn them in an authentic context. When teachers first design PBL projects, they are often limited. In fact, I recommend that. Teachers and students must learn to become better PBL practitioners, so limited projects can lead to more ambitious projects. One of the criteria for a more ambitious project is to integrate the disciplines. Teachers develop PBL curriculum for the coming year. Photo Credit: Andrew Miller Use a Variety of Planning Strategies I wrote about many of these strategies in a previous blog post. Larger Part of the Meal Not all integrated projects are equal when it comes to the disciplines. Many "Courses" in the Project

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/integrated-pbl-full-course-meal-andrew-miller

Related:  Project Based LearningPBL / InquiryProject Based Learningcurriculum

Wall-to-wall project-based learning: A conversation with biology teacher Kelley Yonce At the mid-point of the 2008-09 academic year, according to the North Carolina Standard Course of Study, East Wake School of Integrated Technology biology teacher Kathleen (Kelley) Yonce needed to introduce her class of 20 sophomores to deoxyribonucleic acid, a.k.a. DNA. An avowed project-based learning (PBL) teacher who creates 7-8 learning projects, one after another, each lasting between 1½ and 3½ weeks, throughout the school year, she consulted her usual sources of inspiration — Edutopia, the New Schools Project — but nothing struck her fancy.

Preparing Students for a Project-Based World Authored by Bonnie Lathram, Bob Lenz and Tom Vander Ark Download the PublicationDownload the Student Quick Start Guide In the paper, Preparing Students for a Project-Based World, released jointly by Getting Smart and Buck Institute for Education (BIE), we explore equity, economic realities, student engagement and instructional and school design in the preparation of all students for college, career and citizenship. The new economic realities are illustrated by Robin Chase, founder of Zipcar: “My father had one job in his life. I’ve had six in mine, my kids will have six at the same time.” 24 Project Ideas from Global Digital Citizenship Foundation Project Based Learning in the Classroom: Project Ideas Year 10-12 includes projects with these driving questions: What goes into training and improving the performance of a professional athlete?Why are creative minds and critical thinkers so crucial to the evolution of our way of life?What does it take to turn your passion into a business?How can we show the parallel between modern life and the lives of characters in classic works of literature?

A Project-Based Learning Cheat Sheet For Authentic Learning A Project-Based Learning Cheat Sheet by TeachThought Staff Like most buzzwords in education, “authenticity” isn’t a new idea. For decades, teachers have sought to make student learning “authentic” by looking to the “real world”–the challenges, technology, and communities that students care about and connect with daily. You’ve probably been encouraged in the past to design work that “leaves the classroom.” Project Based Learning Science – Lesson Plans for PBL Putting together a PBL science plan can be enormously time consuming without excellent models. So here are hundreds of free detailed plans for projects for elementary, middle and high school students. The plans are sorted by discipline - astronomy and space, chemistry, engineering and architecture, physics, technology, and earth, life sciences, physical sciences, and... well, "other" for no clear fit. Most of the ones I've listed provide project overviews, guiding questions, procedures and activities, work product descriptions, grading rubrics, and questions for reflection.

Five Ways to Ensure Real Learning Happens in Maker-Enhanced Projects While not new, project-based learning has become a popular method to try and move beyond surface-level learning. Many teachers are trying to figure out the right ingredients for strong projects that interest and engage students, while helping them meet required learning targets. But implementing project-based learning well isn’t easy, especially when many teachers are more accustomed to direct instruction, when they can be sure they’ve at least touched on all the topics in the curriculum. On top of the push toward projects, some educators are also embracing maker-education, a distinct but often overlapping idea. Problem-Based Learning or Just Another Project? Use This Checklist to Find Out A few days ago I posted Amy Mayer’s comparison between assigning projects and developing project-based learning in the classroom. Due to its immense popularity, I decided to do some more research on helpful charts for teachers trying to implement PBL in their classrooms, and was thrilled to come across this checklist from the good folks at BIE: This checklist is a fantastic way to ensure that you are on the right track with shifting away from “doing a project” and moving towards project-based learning.

100 Incredibly Useful YouTube Channels for Teachers YouTube has earned a reputation for featuring brain cell-slaughtering fare such as the truly abysmal Fred and playing host to the some of the most depressingly stupid comments this side of Yahoo! News. But for every participant liberally dishing out misspelled racist, sexist and homophobic talking points, there is at least one whose channel genuinely offers something provocative and educational. For teachers hoping to infuse multimedia into their classrooms, YouTube makes for an excellent starting point.

High Tech High - Project Based Learning Seven Successful PBL Projects In March 2005 High Tech High received a $250,000 grant from the California Department of Education to disseminate project-based learning methods to teachers in non-charter public schools. As part of the project, High Tech High teachers have documented successful projects to share with collaborating teachers from local districts and across the HTH network. The current volume presents the fruits of these labors. 13 Tips for Students Getting Started with Project-Based Learning On a recent visit to speak to college students at the University of Washington, I asked how many of the students were regularly engaged in project-based learning at the university level. I was surprised that only a few students raised their hands. As we have been exploring in our series about project-based learning, it is a project-based world. The reality is, my kids (and yours) and your students are heading into a new economy and a vast technological change.

42 Fill-in-the-Blank Prompts For Students To Design Their Own Projects 42 Fill-in-the-Blank Prompts For Students To Design Their Own Projects by Terry Heick So often, we make learning more complicated than it has to be. Local planning requirements are usually at fault here–plan this way and prove that you’ve done so here and here, fill out this and this, etc.

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