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I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me

I Liked Everything I Saw on Facebook for Two Days. Here’s What It Did to Me
There’s this great Andy Warhol quote you’ve probably seen before: “I think everybody should like everybody.” You can buy posters and plates with pictures of Warhol, looking like the cover of a Belle & Sebastian album, with that phrase plastered across his face in Helvetica. But the full quote, taken from a 1963 interview in Art News, is a great description of how we interact on social media today. Warhol: Someone said that Brecht wanted everybody to think alike. I want everybody to think alike. But Brecht wanted to do it through Communism, in a way. The like and the favorite are the new metrics of success—very literally. I like everything. See, Facebook uses algorithms to decide what shows up in your feed. There is a very specific form of Facebook messaging, designed to get you to interact. The first thing I liked was Living Social—my friend Jay had liked it before me and it was sitting at the top of my feed. Sometimes, liking is counterintuitive. Go Back to Top.

http://www.wired.com/2014/08/i-liked-everything-i-saw-on-facebook-for-two-days-heres-what-it-did-to-me/

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