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Joe Sacco’s “The Great War” - The New Yorker

Joe Sacco’s “The Great War” - The New Yorker
Joe Sacco’s latest work, “The Great War,” a twenty-four-foot-long panorama that folds like an accordion, illustrates the first day of the Battle of the Somme, one of the bloodiest battles in history, which took place on July 1, 1916. The Maltese-American cartoonist is best known for his comics journalism, including works like “Palestine,” “Safe Area Goražde,” and “Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt” (his 2012 New York Times best-selling collaboration with Chris Hedges), but “The Great War” is a purely visual work, homing in on a specific moment in history. We spoke with Sacco about his approach. When I got a call from an old friend of mine, an editor at Norton, asking me to draw a panorama of the Western front, my first response was “No!” Being a cartoonist, I always think in terms of narrative—but I grew up on Australia, and there the First World War truly gives Australians a sense of national identity. I don’t feel a separation from the people I read about in history books.

http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/joe-saccos-the-great-war

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Search for the great war Change Station See Stations Search Results for "the great war" Filter byStationMedia TypeProgramVideo Length Showing 1 - 10 of 86 results Sort By:Date|Relevance Teaching World War I With The New York Times This summer marked the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife by a Serbian nationalist — the catalyst that sent Europe into a spiral of war and destruction for the next four and a half years. Below, we offer a series of topics and questions paired with Times essays, articles, slide shows and videos to help students dig deeper into the causes, effects and overall legacy of World War I. We imagine students could use these resources as part of a class jigsaw activity, a mini-research project or a jumping-off point for discussion and analysis. Remaking the Map of Europe

First world war centenary is a year to honour the dead but not to glorify On the morning of 18 August 1918, units of the Belgian army climbed out of their trenches and advanced. For the first time since the invasion of their country four years earlier, they drove the Germans back, and in doing so took the hamlet of De Kuiper. It was not recognisable any more as a place where anyone had ever lived, simply a desolate wasteland of mud and craters, but it was, nonetheless, Belgian land, their land. It was for Belgians a small but symbolic victory, a proud victory. Back home in Radlett, Hertfordshire, my grandfather, Emile Cammaerts, heard the glad news and rejoiced. He was a fiercely patriotic Belgian poet – it could be said, the Rupert Brooke of the the Belgians – who, after the German invasion of his country, had written deeply felt and stirring poems, to summon up Belgian blood, to stiffen Belgian sinews.

Michael Morpurgo: We are who we are now, in large part, because of the first world war Michael Morpurgo came into the Guardian to do a podcast interview with two site members, Orli, aged 14 and JDBookGroup's Fernando aged 11. The resulting conversation was so beautiful and profound we decided to publish the whole transcript here! Fernando: What message do you want to give to children by basing so many of your books on the war?I don't want to give a message to children. What I want is to tell a story to children, and then I want the children to make of it what they would like to make of it. The Great War Welcome to The GREAT WAR YouTube-Channel. If you are new here, watch this short introduction by Indy to help you get going. Our playlist of regular weekly updates: Prelude To War-Special series right: Recap-Episodes: Special Episodes: Episodes:

A quest for truth: why I made Only Remembered Tragedy: 10 million soldiers were killed world war one, this photograph shows one of the most well known mass war graves, Ypres in France. Photograph: Antonio Olmos/The Guardian A few years ago I came across the grave of a young British soldier in France, one of thousands, one of hundreds of thousands. Viewpoint: 10 big myths about World War One debunked 25 February 2014Last updated at 15:45 GMT Much of what we think we know about the 1914-18 conflict is wrong, writes historian Dan Snow. No war in history attracts more controversy and myth than World War One. For the soldiers who fought it was in some ways better than previous conflicts, and in some ways worse. By setting it apart as uniquely awful we are blinding ourselves to the reality of not just WW1 but war in general.

Internet History Sourcebooks Internet Modern History Sourcebook The Internet Modern History Sourcebook now contains thousands of sources and the previous index pages were so large that they were crashing many browsers. See Introduction for an explanation of the Sourcebook's goals. Explanation of Sources of Material Here.

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