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Teaching Questioning Skills to Arm Students for Learning - Work in Progress

Teaching Questioning Skills to Arm Students for Learning - Work in Progress
In the earliest part of my career, I wrote full procedural lesson plans that spelled out to the letter the questions I would ask AND the answers I considered correct. When the students didn't provide the proscribed answer, I asked helper questions until I elicited the appropriate response. Man, did I have it wrong! This is the battle we fight. It demands our full attention. And if we are going to go to battle, we should appropriately arm our learners. Children are born curious; they have a hunger to learn and a thirst for understanding. Current educational institutions systematically rob curiosity from children, training them to seek one answer, the "right" one. Unfortunately, while on their predictable adventure to the right of truth, kids often lose interest in the passions that once propelled them. One way we change the level of engagement in our classroom is stop doing all of the asking. Here are some tips for teaching students how to ask good questions:

http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/work_in_progress/2014/08/teaching_questioning_skills_to.html

Related:  inquiryAsking QuestionsSynligt lärandeThinking, Teaching and Learning

For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer Thinkstock In a traditional classroom, the teacher is the center of attention, the owner of knowledge and information. Teachers often ask questions of their students to gauge comprehension, but it’s a passive model that relies on students to absorb information they need to reproduce on tests. What would happen if the roles were flipped and students asked the questions? That’s the premise of the Right Question Institute and a new book by its co-directors Dan Rothstein and Luz Santana.

Powerful Questions to further deeper thinking Part 1) 1/9/2012 4pm Prabha C. filled in for Alexandra - Questions for information are different than powerful questions. Students Tell All: What It’s Like to Be Trusted Partners in Learning Inquiry-based learning is not a new pedagogy, but it has come back into fashion in progressive education circles recently because of new emphasis on the power of students’ innate curiosity to drive learning. Inquiry-based learning asks students to discover knowledge on their own with guidance from their teachers. Rather than receiving information up front through lectures, students research guiding questions, ask their own follow-ups and get help along the way.

Critical Thinking: Definitions and Assessments January 3, 2013 By: Maryellen Weimer, PhD in Educational Assessment Despite almost universal agreement that critical thinking needs to be taught in college, now perhaps more than ever before, there is much less agreement on definitions and dimensions. Powerful Questions to Inspire Positive Change Good questions can be powerful in life-changing ways. They can spark exciting ideas and inventions. They can spark personal discoveries, which lead to fulfilling, meaningful lives. According to historian David Hackett Fischer, questions “are the engines of intellect — cerebral machines that convert curiosity into controlled inquiry.”

Tools for metacognition Metacognition is an important part of intentional learning, since it involves actively thinking about what you know, what you don’t know, and how you can get better at knowing and applying what you know. A mantra for metacognition State the learning problem with some specificity: identify what you want to know and what you want to do with that knowledgeChoose strategies to solve the learning problem—draw upon your own prior knowledge and the knowledge of othersObserve how you used the strategies—keep a learning journal or blogEvaluate the results: What worked? What didn’t work?

Questioning Toolkit Essential Questions These are questions which touch our hearts and souls. They are central to our lives. They help to define what it means to be human. Most important thought during our lives will center on such essential questions. Influential Leaders Ask These 6 Questions The key to being a powerful leader isn't giving orders -- it's extending your influence. And one important way to do that is by spreading and soliciting new ideas. As an influential leader, you are a conduit of ideas. Some are your own, while others are from your team. Some are well-baked concepts and validated theories, while others are raw musings and trial balloons. But to be an influential leader, one way or another, you must forward these ideas and ultimately convert them into action.

Education Week Published Online: September 22, 2015 Published in Print: September 23, 2015, as Growth Mindset, Revisited Commentary By Carol Dweck Should I teach problem-, project-, or inquiry-based learning? SmartBlogs Lately, there have been a bunch of buzzwords floating around the education world that all seem to mean the same thing. You’ve probably heard them: problem-based learning, project-based learning and inquiry-based learning. Is there a difference?

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