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The 6 Levels Of Bloom's Taxonomy, Explained With Active Verbs

The 6 Levels Of Bloom's Taxonomy, Explained With Active Verbs
The various levels of Bloom’s (Revised) Taxonomy are pretty well known to most teachers at this point. The gradated levels of critical thinking allow teachers to build lesson plans and identify learning outcomes that are appropriate for the level of exploration of material for the students at that time. A useful way of understanding how to put Bloom’s into action in your classroom (and ensuring that you’re using the right level of the taxonomy while doing it) is through the use of action verbs. Expanding on the basic verbs used in the taxonomy (Creating, Analyzing, Remembering, etc), you can add other verbs that fall into each category to help you delineate different types of activities that address the specific level of Bloom’s Taxonomy you’re looking for. Mia MacMeekin has created the below graphic with a huge variety of different verbs that can apply for each category. What other verbs would you add? Creating devisebuilddesignformulateimaginecollect Evaluating Analyzing Applying

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Bloom's Digital Taxonomy This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous. Bloom's Revised Taxonomy describes many traditional classroom practices, behaviours and actions, but does not account for the new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies, infowhelm (the exponential growth in information), increasing ubiquitous personal technologies or cloud computing.Bloom's Digital Taxonomy isn't about the tools or technologies rather it is about using these to facilitate learning. Outcomes on rubrics are measured by competence of use and most importantly the quality of the process or product. For example.

10 creative ways to teach English that deliver outstanding results As a creative school, with a track record in fantastic English results, we are often asked what our specific approach is: how do we teach through the arts yet manage to maintain such high expectations from all our pupils? I'd like to share some of these approaches with you: Immersion activities How can children access stories, poems and other texts if their minds and imaginations not fully engaged? We have found that immersing children in a range of creative activities before reading the text means that they are fully prepared, and excited, about the reading journey ahead of them.

The 27 Characteristics of A 21st Century Teacher "21st Century Educator" is probably the most popular buzzword in today's education. There is a growing and heated debate whether or not to label educators as 21st century and each camp has its own concept and arguments, however, for me personally I see teaching in 21st century as having undergone a paradigmatic shift. This is basically due to the emerging of the " social web" and the huge embrace of technology and particularly the mobile gadgetry in our classrooms.

How To Use Bloom’s Taxonomy To Write Learning Outcomes By: Scott Davis Business Analyst, Pearson It is often quite difficult to relate inputs to outcomes in the world of education. Traditionally, much work has been done to develop and provide inputs into the process of education. These inputs, such as a textbook, an assessment, a learning technology or platform, a course, a qualification, a high-stakes test or professional development for teachers are put into the hands of an educational leader, a skillful teacher, or an eager student. And, for all of the investment, expertise, and care that go into their creation, that has typically been where the involvement ends.

The 5 Emerging Educational Technologies You Should Know about January31, 2014 The educational landscape is witnessing a drastic change due to the use and integration of emerging technologies. However, though these changes are revolutionary but they are still far from being transformative because the gap between the technologies our students are using out of school and the ones they have access to inside the walls of school is widening. With the emergence and massive uptake of these new emerging technologies, there appeared a new learning culture one which is catalyst of the culture schools should encourage and cultivate. And until we get past the CIPA act and other inhibiting practices and policies, this gap will keep on widening. Greek Myth Comix Presents Homer's Iliad & Odyssey Using Stick-Man Drawings The next time some know-it-all moralist blames any number of social ills on violent video games or action films, ask them if they’d rather kids stick to the classics. When they invariably reply in the affirmative, you can smugly direct their attention to Greek Myth Comix’s astonishing infographic detailing the multitude of gruesome killings in the Iliad. Homer’s epic unflinchingly describes, for example, in graphic detail, the death of Lycon, who in Book 16 has a sword thrust through his neck: “nothing held but a piece of skin, and from that, Lycon’s head dangled down.” And if you’ve held on to your lunch, you may be interested to know the grisly circumstances of the other two candidates for “grimmest death.” Just below, see a section of the comic celebrating “stand out performances in battle.” Can Zack Snyder’s King Leonidas match kills with Homer’s Achilles?

New Bloom's Taxonomy Poster for Teachers August 29, 2014 Bloom's taxonomy is one of the most popular learning taxonomies ever. Since its release in the last half of the 20th century, it has been widely adopted within the education sector and was used extensively to design and create learning materials and curriculum content. Bloom's taxonomy maps out learning skills along a thinking continuum that starts with lower order thinking skills in one end (e.g. remembering and understanding) and moves up in difficulty to the other end that embraces higher order thinking skills (e.g. evaluating and creating). However, Bloom's taxonomy has been repeatedly modified to suit the requirements of the era in which it is used . Thus, we ended up having different versions of Blooms taxonomy. The visual below from Fractus Learning captures these versions into three main columns ( Bloom's original taxonomy, Bloom's modified taxonomy, and Bloom's digital taxonomy).

Teaching critical thinking using Bloom’s Taxonomy - Cambridge Conversations In her previous post for Cambridge Conversations, Unlock author Carolyn Westbrook introduced the basics of teaching Critical Thinking in ELT. Today, she explores Bloom’s Taxonomy. Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Objectives classifies a number of skills which can be used to teach critical thinking. The six skills are often depicted as a triangle, as above.

Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday: Some favourite nonfiction titles for older readers (List 2) It’s Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday! This is Week 2 of 3 where I will be sharing thirty titles (ten at a time) of my favourite nonfiction books for older readers. The first ten are here. My post last week goes into more detail of why I wanted to put together these three lists. Basically, I had just written a number of blog posts featuring titles for younger readers (like this one) and had received a comment about older students losing their passion for nonfiction titles.

Using Bloom's Taxonomy In The 21st Century: 4 Strategies For Teaching 4 Strategies For Teaching With Bloom’s Taxonomy by TeachThought Staff Bloom’s Taxonomy can be a powerful tool to transform teaching and learning. By design, it focuses attention away from content and instruction, and instead emphasizes the “cognitive events” in the mind of a child. And this is no small change. For decades, education reform has been focused on curriculum, assessment, instruction, and more recently standards, and data, with these efforts only bleeding over into how students think briefly, and by chance. 3 Good Free Classroom Posters for Teachers While I was leafing through the content of ICTmagic, which is one of my favourite educational wiki, I came across this page featuring a set of some interesting classroom posters. These posters are free to download both in PDF or JPG format. You can also print them off and use them with your students.

How to Tell Stories with Maps School of Data has published a good round-up of narrative mapping platforms. The article includes a few examples of good story maps and explores some of the mapping libraries which can be used to create interactive maps to annotate or narrate a story. Seven Ways to Create a Storymap reviews popular narrative mapping libraries such as Knight Lab's StoryMap JS, Esri StoryMaps and CartoDB's Odyssey.js. It even mentions my own story map demo created using waypoints.js with Leaflet, JourneyMap. One of the examples listed in the School of Data article is new to me. LeafletPlayback is a very neat Leaflet library which allows you to animate GPS Tracks, in the form of GeoJSON objects, on a Leaflet map.

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