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8 Needs For Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century

8 Needs For Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century
8 Needs For Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century by Terry Heick We recently offered a definition of project-based learning, and looked at keys to designing Project-Based Learning. We also have looked at the difference between “doing projects” and project-based learning, various project-based learning resources, project-based learning apps, and offered ways for using an iPad in Project-Based Learning. And have shared some practical ideas for better teaching through project-based learning as well. What might be missing from these posts, however, are simply the characteristics of project-based learning in the 21st century. We tend to think of project-based learning as focused on research, planning problem-solving, authenticity, and inquiry. But what if we had to settle on a handful (or two) of itemized characteristics for modern, connected, possibly place-based, and often digital project-based learning? 8 Needs For Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century 1. Or connectivity. 2. 3. 4. Related:  VerktygslådaPBL 2Te@chThought.com PBL Resources

12 Questions To Promote Self-Knowledge In Students Merging Metacognition & Citizenship by Terry Heick Ed note: This post has been updated from a previous post in 2013. Why should someone learn? While Paulo Freire, John Dewey, and others have provided compelling arguments for what might be the goal of education, learning and education are not one and the same. Learning—here defined as the overall effect of incrementally acquiring, synthesizing, and applying information—changes beliefs. 12 Questions To Help Students See Themselves As Thinkers Self-knowledge is formed through ranges of meta-cognition and basic epistemology. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Globalization & Citizenship Authentic self-knowledge and accountable local placement promote healthy communities that can solve problems and celebrate knowledge on a scale that resonates globally. How should the role of the teacher change in the light of modern access to information in much of the world? Should education aspire to “keep pace” with technology change?

Integrated PBL Projects: A Full-Course Meal! In the project-based learning field, we use the metaphor that projects are the "main course, not the dessert" (as coined in an article from the Buck Institute for Education). Projects are intended to create the need-to-know content and skills, and the opportunity for students to learn them in an authentic context. When teachers first design PBL projects, they are often limited. In fact, I recommend that. Teachers and students must learn to become better PBL practitioners, so limited projects can lead to more ambitious projects. One of the criteria for a more ambitious project is to integrate the disciplines. Teachers develop PBL curriculum for the coming year. Photo Credit: Andrew Miller Use a Variety of Planning Strategies I wrote about many of these strategies in a previous blog post. Larger Part of the Meal Not all integrated projects are equal when it comes to the disciplines. Many "Courses" in the Project

4 Keys To Designing A Project-Based Learning Classroom - Traditional American classrooms tend to fit a particular mold: Students face the front of the class where teachers lecture. Students take notes, finish assignments at home, and hope to memorize enough information just long enough to pass a test. Engagement and passion are often in short supply — among students and teachers. The system does not necessarily accommodate all learning styles, and even those who fair well may be missing out on other important work-life lessons, like how to creatively solve problems, stay focused, work as part of a team, and organize their thoughts in a way others will understand. This is where project-based learning enters the equation. What is Project-Based Learning? Project-based learning, or PBL, is generating a great deal of buzz in the world of education, and is often portrayed as an alternative to passive learning and rote memorization. 4 Must-Follow Rules For Designing A PBL Classroom 1. One key? 2. PBL is not a paper-pushing style of learning. 3. 4.

Differentiation through Multiple Intelligences Minds in Bloom is happy to present Michelle Dupuis with her guest post! Enjoy! Differentiation in the classroom is not an option anymore. Is it difficult? Maybe Does it take time? Will it motivate your students? Will it help them learn? The trick to differentiation is taking baby steps. Teaching with Multiple Intelligences is an easy and fun way to start differentiating today. What are Multiple Intelligences? Well, we all know the two most visible and dominant intelligences in the school system are linguistic and logical-mathematical. Here are the different Multiple Intelligences: Multiple Intelligences Kid friendly terms Everybody has a bit of each intelligence. I’ll explain. So how can you differentiate your teaching with Multiple Intelligences? You don’t have to teach or learn something in all eight ways, but take the time to see what the possibilities are when you plan for your week. Some of you are probably thinking: How will we assess them? 20 to 30 minutes to: Thank you for reading!

9 Steps to Create an E-learning Course According to Workforce.com, 73% of Fortune 500 companies are using online methods to train their employees, and ELearning.com says that 77% of American firms are already using eLearning. These statistics clearly state that global organizations are increasingly relying on eLearning to train their geographically dispersed workforce. If your organization has still not implemented eLearning and wants to get started, here are the steps to follow. Step 1: Training Needs analysis: The first thing that you need to do is conduct a needs analysis. Critical questions that we need to ask ourselves are neatly summed up by Nick van Dam in his book – The ELearning Fieldbook. If we build it, will they come? Step 2: Comprehend the content thoroughly: Good content comprehension guarantees that your eLearning course is not disrupted and is on track. Step 3: Frame appropriate learning objectives: The next step after content comprehension is framing appropriate learning objectives. Step 5: Make an Outline:

Self-Directed Learning Through A Culture Of "Can" Self-Directed Learning Through A Culture Of “Can” The long-term output of any school should be not just proficient students, but enabled learners. An “enabled” learner can grasp macro views, uncover micro details, ask questions, plan for new knowledge and transfer thinking across divergent circumstances. First, it’s important to realize that a “culture” is comprised of tangible factors (students) and intangible factors (curiosity). Learning Can If a learner is develop a sense of can, he or she must learn it. While some students have more natural confidence or initiative than others, can is slightly different than confidence. So how does this happen? Read the rest of the article Terry Heick’s blog at Edutopia.

Six Steps for Planning a Successful Project Sure, King Middle School has some amazing projects, but the Portland school has been refining its expeditionary learning projects for nearly two decades. David Grant, who guides the school's technology integration and curriculum development, has put together a six-step rubric for designing a project. He says Fading Footprints, which became a model for King and Expeditionary Learning Schools, doesn't take an entire school, or even a team of twelve, to plan and carry out; one or two teachers can tailor this one to fit their time and resources. Six Steps to Planning a Project The Fading Footsteps project is a twelve-week interdisciplinary ecology unit centered around the guiding question: How does diversity strengthen an ecosystem? Using this project as an example, see how King Middle School creates an action plan around each step. How they do it: The 1-to-1 laptop program was a bonus when it came to creating a comprehensive final product. Step 5: Coordinate calendars.

The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning by TeachThought Staff Projects in the classroom are as old as the classroom itself. “Projects” can represent a range of tasks that can be done at home or in the classroom, by parents or groups of students, quickly or over time. While project-based learning (PBL) also features projects, in PBL the focus is more on the process of learning and learner-peer-content interaction that the end-product itself. The learning process is also personalized in a progressive PBL environment by students asking important questions, and making changes to products and ideas based on individual and collective response to those questions. By design, PBL is learner-centered. The chart below by Amy Mayer is helpful to clarify that important difference between projects and project-based learning. What’s the Difference Between “Doing Projects” and Project Based Learning ?

A Design Challenge to Students: Solve a Real-World Problem! Teaching Strategies Design Learning Challenge Creating a safe recreation space for teens; protoyping a recyclable lunch tray; setting up a water delivery system to guard against urban fires; building a public awareness campaign to combat hunger. These are just a few of examples of the types of tasks students are taking on when they participate in the Design Learning Challenge, an effort to get students to figure out how to solve real-world problems in their communities. Combining project-based learning, with an emphasis on the arts and design thinking, this academic competition now in its third year — a partnership between the Industrial Designers Society of America, or IDSA, and the National Art Education Association, or NAEA — has more than 750 students participating this year. Educators who enter the competition work with their students to identify a significant problem or challenge in their lives for which they can design a solution. Related

20 productivity apps to keep you organised Business We’ve been meaning to post this for ages, but never quite got round to doing it… In a digital world, there are more distractions than ever. There’s always another cat gif to lol at, another tweet to send, another gaming level to attempt. Just as soon as you get round to downloading them. 20 Ways to Keep Your Students' Attention As the end of the year approaches, it can be more and more challenging to keep your students' attention. Brain Breaks are important, but there are plenty of things you can do within a lesson to keep kids from day dreaming...or worse yet, nodding off. Here are some ideas:Desk Switch: Students have ten seconds (count down from ten) to find another desk to sit in that is in a different part of the room than his or her normal desk. Students stay in that desk for the rest of the lesson. Why? Two reasons, first switching desks gets them up and moving. Did you get a new idea?

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