background preloader

Boomwriter

Boomwriter

Six Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students What’s the opposite of scaffolding a lesson? Saying to students, “Read this nine-page science article, write a detailed essay on the topic it explores, and turn it in by Wednesday.” Yikes! No safety net, no parachute—they’re just left to their own devices. Let’s start by agreeing that scaffolding a lesson and differentiating instruction are two different things. Simply put, scaffolding is what you do first with kids. Scaffolding and differentiation do have something in common, though. So let’s get to some scaffolding strategies you may or may not have tried yet. 1. How many of us say that we learn best by seeing something rather than hearing about it? Try a fishbowl activity, where a small group in the center is circled by the rest of the class; the group in the middle, or fishbowl, engages in an activity, modeling how it’s done for the larger group. 2. 3. All learners need time to process new ideas and information. 4. 5. 6.

Project-based learning, the USA and Authentic Video in the EFL classroom | Elisabeth Horn The Globe Trekker/Pilot Guides video collection is a treasure trove for any English teacher. It encompasses extensive material from every corner of the world, and especially English-speaking countries are lavished with attention. Australia, Canada, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, England – you name it. Even individual cities are endowed with an approx. 50-minute complete video of its own, like London, New York City, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New Orleans to name but a few. Covering the United States satisfactorily in the language classroom is a daunting project, especially if you want to give your students more than a superficial understanding of its history, geography, language and people. To date, Globe Trekker offers a range of videos on the USA, covering practically every individual state, and, so it seems, more is coming every new season. In addition to making this initial decision, there are quite a lot of follow-up issues to consider: The route travelled in the video “Deep South”

British Life and Culture in the UK - Woodlands Junior School Using Mentor Texts to Motivate and Support Student Writers If we want students to do something well, it helps to both tell them and show them what we expect. When it comes to writing assignments, we teachers will give students directions to write a convincing essay or draft a descriptive narrative followed by telling them how to earn a good grade on it. Many of us also hand out a rubric or criteria chart that tells all the expectations for the essay. But, with all that there is to cover and the time crunch, we may sacrifice showing them mentor texts, examples of good writing. Show Not Tell Let's take a moment to think of ourselves when we learn: Do we understand something and apply it better when we are shown a finished product while also being told about it? So if we want students to write a convincing persuasive essay that includes evidence, let's show them examples. Now, I know what some of you are thinking: when I show them a student model it often gets copied or parroted back! So how do we keep students from mimicking or from freezing up?

HowToWriteGhostStory.pdf Teach With a Mt View: Building Fluent Readers + Link Up! We have all heard about the shift that happens, usually between second and third grade, when students (should) go from learning to read to reading to learn. Unfortunately, for some students, their ability to read to learn is stifled by their inability to read fluently. Even for those kids who can read at an average pace, the faster and more accurately they can read and decode, the more effectively they can comprehend. When I taught third grade, and now as an interventionist, the importance of fluency is empathized more than ever (and has definitely met some critics). 1. I know what you’re thinking—this is obvious. Update: I now have a FREE download that includes the above anchor chart! 2. Have you discovered the Super Speed games from Whole Brain Teaching? 3. Audacity is a free voice recording software you can download onto just about any computer (You could use any voice recording software for this). 4. 5. 6. 7. Day 1 of new passage ONLY: Every Day: 8. I love the FCRR! 9. 10.

Daily Fluency Menu Fluency Boot Camp! | Reading. Writing. Thinking. Sharing. Break up the mid-winter slump, and bring Fluency Boot Camp into your classroom! What is a Fluency Boot Camp? No… you will not be shipping your students off (sorry), nor will students have to march around the room (your choice), but I can guarantee that your students’ brains will be sweating as they participate in the classroom fluency camp you create! Just like any boot camp, students will build confidence through practice and drills. You can organize it for just one day, or you can set it up to last a full-week or month! Keep in mind, after just one day, students will start melting-away their non-fluent reading habits… and by the end of the week or month, students will be on their way to becoming confident, fluent readers! Are you sold on the idea yet? How to Organize Your Fluency Boot Camp Fluency Boot Camp can be modified and customized for pretty much any grade-level and classroom situation. Here’s a Fluency Boot Camp Planning Page to help you get started! Fluency Boot Camp Materials

Rewordify.com: Understand what you read

Related: