background preloader

50 Stunning Examples of Urban Decay Photography

50 Stunning Examples of Urban Decay Photography
Related:  ABANDONEDUrban Exploration!

Houses Gone Wild We think of feral dogs as dangerous, foreboding and to-be-avoid – but wild houses have a strange allure despite (or likely because) they are abandoned abodes, deserted homes gone from domestic spaces slowly back to nature. As photographer James D Griffioen muses, the Latin root refers both to while beasts but also to something that belongs to the dead, gone back to the Earth. Some of his shots capture this process at an incredibly late stage, such as the house above which is entirely camouflaged by the greenery that has grown to cover it – only discernible because the branches and vines conform to the shape of the structure. Others photos catch the domestic devolution at intermediate stages, snapshots of partial overgrowth where there is still some strange balance of building and nature – one could almost imagine someone still occupying this structure and simply never leaving it.

Abandoned Baton Rouge Most accomplishments in my adult life first appeared as items on to-do lists written on scrap paper. An abandoned motor lodge over 1,000 miles from my Brooklyn apartment called The Bellemont first made it back onto one of those to-do lists on March 30 when a commenter on this blog wrote that it was the lodging for Bette Davis and Joan Crawford while shooting the film "Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte" at Houmas House on River Road. (Joan did not last long on the film set-- it's too much to get into here, but there was no love lost between the actresses. It wasn't just those two superstars who stayed at the Bellemont (allegedly): it was Clark Gable, John Wayne, Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, and later Jackie Gleason and Richard Pryor when filming "The Toy", as well as Sonny and Cher, presumably when they were employed full-time by America as wearers of horribly awesome polyester pantsuits. And all of this is just what I gleaned from digital hearsay in my blog comments.

30 Minimal Logo Designs that Say More with Less A logo is the visual cornerstone of one’s branding. While some logos are complex, often the most memorable ones are those that are simplistic. Instead of relying on detailed graphics and icons, these minimal logos rely on creative typography, simple shapes, and clever negative space to tell the story. Here is a showcase of 30 minimal logo designs that say more with less. About the Author Henry Jones is a web developer, designer, and entrepreneur with over 14 years of experience. Related Posts 1753 shares Examples of Effective Minimalism in Logo Design When trying to create something visually impressive, it’s tempting to use lots of eye candy or overloaded detail. Read More 317 shares 40 Brilliant Type-Only Logo Designs Logos do not always have to include some type of symbol or icon to be effective.

Abandoned Amusement Park Amusement park is the generic term for a collection of rides and other entertainment attractions assembled for the purpose of entertaining a large group of people. An amusement park is more elaborate than a simple city park or playground, usually providing attractions meant to cater to adults, teenagers, and small children. A theme park is a type of amusement park which has been built around one or more themes, such as an American West theme, or Atlantis. Most amusement parks have a fixed location, as compared to travelling funfairs and carnivals. Abandoned Six Flags Hurricane Katrina killed this clown. According to the photographer, “An abandoned Six Flags amusement park, someone spray painted ‘Six Flags 2012 coming soon’ on the wall above the downed head. But they were clownin.’ Six Flags will never rebuild here.” Welcome to Zombie Land kids! Chained dreams of fun at Six Flags New Orleans, abandoned Jazzland – that’s what Six Flags opened as “Jazzland” in 2000. Some photographers can see past the lifeless amusement park’s decay and desolation, showing us that there is still a chance the place could be cheery and not cheerless. Like a Bad Dream. Just in case you don’t know the scoop on what Hurricane Katrina did to New Orleans and Six Flags, this photo is of New Orleans, LA, on Sept. 14, 2005. Unlike the bleak amusement-less park above, some photographers can still see and share with us the echo of magic in the abandoned theme park Six Flags – even 6 years later in 2011. No lines for dead rides. Watch out for that tree! No one wants a ride?

Abandoned Places: 10 Creepy, Beautiful Modern Ruins Abandoned Places: 10 Creepy, Beautiful Modern Ruins Abandoned Places | We humans are explorers by nature. The quest for discovery, both old and new, is part of what separates us from rest of the animal kingdom. Since the world we live in has been largely mapped and plotted, we urban adventurers turn our sights toward the relics of old and the ruins of the recent past. If you find beauty in urban decay, in the crumbling and abandoned places of yesteryear, you’ll want to read on. Abandoned Submarine Base, Ukraine In a bay on the northern shores of the Black Sea, the Soviet army maintained an elaborate submarine base throughout much of the Cold War. Abandoned Submarine Base Gallery The Ruins of Detroit by Marchand and Meffre In the United States, few cities have felt the burn of urban decay more than Detroit. Ruins of Detroit Gallery Beelitz Military Hospital, Berlin It is rare that a ruin like this should decay so gracefully and without the marks of vandalism. Beelitz Military Hospital Gallery

8 Aesthetically Awesome Abandoned Theaters: From Dusty Drive-Ins to Classic Cinemas 8 Abandoned Theaters: Dusty Drive-Ins to Classic Cinemas Article by Urbanist, filed under Abandoned Places in the Architecture category. Everything in this world has a shelf life and movie theaters are no exception to this rule. It seems like every major city in the world has its own fair share of these abandoned theaters which were once popular weekend hangouts for people of all ages and are now just ghostly memories of the past. (Guest author Andrew Boyd is an expert on travel hacks - and see more at 100+ Abandoned Buildings, Places and Property. Many of these abandoned cinemas are in a sense being recycled into apartments, office buildings, and for some even haunted houses. Booker T Theater [Rocky Mount, North Carolina] The Booker T Theater in Rocky Mount, North Carolina was once called the Savoy Theater in its early days. Sattler Theater [Buffalo, New York] This amazing shot of the abandoned Sattler Theater in Buffalo, New York is so surreal.

Color Palette; Nature Nature provides some of the most striking and beautiful color palettes imaginable! You don’t have to look far to find great inspiration. Flowers especially can give you such a varied and bright color scheme that you will never run out of ideas. I had so many flower pictures I wanted to share with you, but this is one of my favorites. Notice how the complimentary colors of green and red are present in nature. Red and yellow are two parts of the triad of primary colors (blue is the other one), too. Nature is, of course, a great source for an earthy color palette. Have you ever seen a Rainbow Eucalyptus tree? Now we plunge under the depths of the Solomon Islands. You’ll want to choose a variety of colors for your scheme. If you are not a diver, you should be! If you’d like to read more about color, check out Why Color is Critical. Technorati Tags: Design, Graphic Design, Color

The Ruins of Detroit Posted Feb 07, 2011 Share This Gallery inShare850 Up and down Detroit’s streets, buildings stand abandoned and in ruin. French photographers Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre set out to document the decline of an American city. From the photographers’ website: Ruins are the visible symbols and landmarks of our societies and their changes, small pieces of history in suspension. The state of ruin is essentially a temporary situation that happens at some point, the volatile result of change of era and the fall of empires. Photography appeared to us as a modest way to keep a little bit of this ephemeral state. William Livingstone House # Michigan Central Station # Atrium, Farwell Building # 18th floor dentist cabinet, David Broderick Tower # Bagley-Clifford Office of the National Bank of Detroit # Ballroom, American Hotel # Melted clock, Cass Technical High School # Old First Unitarian Church # Piano, Saint Albertus School # Woodward Avenue Presbyterian Church, built in the Gothic revival style in 1911 #

The world without us: Chernobyl Nature has made a determined comeback In the 20 years since Chernobyl's reactor No. 4 turned a bustling Soviet city into a ghost town. The people are gone, and in their place are now thriving populations of deer, elk, wild boar, wolves, and even lynx. Trees are pushing up through Lenin Avenue and moss is clinging to the broken sidewalks and abandoned buildings throughout the 19-miles that make up the Exclusion Zone. Tim Mousseau of the University of South Carolina has been studying the effects of radiation on Chernobyl's wildlife, and told National Geographic that despite the higher levels of genetic abnormalities, "one of the great ironies of this particular tragedy is that many animals are doing considerably better than when the humans were there." Radiation levels are still too high for long term exposure, but the Ukraine has opened up the nearby city of Pripyat to daytrippers looking to catch a glimpse of what an urban center would look like after 20 years without a human footprint.

Related:  PhotographyPLACESurbex