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Te Ara - New Zealand

Te Ara - New Zealand
Origins The First World War was caused by the destabilisation of the balance of power in Europe due to the rise of Germany. The war began in 1914 when Austria-Hungary invaded Serbia because of the assassination of an archduke. Countries had made alliances with each other, and soon most of Europe was at war. New Zealand was part of the British Empire, and when Britain declared war on Germany, in August 1914, that meant New Zealand was at war too. The two sides were called the Central Powers (Germany, Austria-Hungary) and the Allies, which included the British Empire, Russia and France. New Zealand enters the war New Zealand decided to send soldiers to fight in the war for a number of reasons, including New Zealand’s strong ties to Britain and its concern with keeping trade routes open so it could continue to export to Britain. Within a month New Zealand troops had occupied Western Samoa, which was a German territory. Gallipoli Turkey had entered the war on the Central Powers side.

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UK Children During WWI 31 March 2014Last updated at 12:40 Continue reading the main story Old pennies Most children had a money box for pocket money. Usually it was 'coppers' - pennies and half-pennies. The Anzac landing at Gallipoli The Anzac landing: overview Why did theAnzacs land? 25 April 1915: Anzac Cove, Gallipoli Historians still debate whether the Anzac troops were landed at the correct place.

BBC Schools - Life in the trenches 31 October 2014Last updated at 15:07 Two British soldiers standing in a flooded communication trench during World War One On the Western Front, the war was fought in trenches. Trenches were long, narrow ditches dug into the ground where soldiers lived all day and night. First World War Facts Origins of the war › World War I began after the fatal shooting of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, in Sarajevo. Origins of World War I › The Allies › The Allied powers consisted of France, Britain, Russia, and their supporters. The Allies of World War I ›

NZHistory, New Zealand history online Anzac Day occurs on 25 April. It commemorates all New Zealanders killed in war and also honours returned servicemen and women. Anzac Day Dates 1916 – Anzac Day gazetted as a half-day holiday 1921 – Anzac Day first marked as a full public holiday 1939 – First year dawn ceremony included in New Zealand Anzac Day commemorations Australian War Memorial Anzac Diversity Collection Anzac Diversity is a collection of case studies exploring the ethnic diversity of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF). Anzac Diversity Anzac Diversity is a collection of case studies exploring the ethnic diversity of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF).

Anzac Day - Anzac Day Anzac Day occurs on 25 April. It commemorates all New Zealanders killed in war and also honours returned servicemen and women. The date itself marks the anniversary of the landing of New Zealand and Australian soldiers – the Anzacs – on the Gallipoli Peninsula in 1915. The aim was to capture the Dardanelles, the gateway to the Bosphorus and the Black Sea. At the end of the campaign, Gallipoli was still held by its Turkish defenders. Thousands lost their lives in the Gallipoli campaign: 87,000 Turks, 44,000 men from France and the British Empire, including 8500 Australians. WW1 Battlefields of the Western Front The long line of battlefields that makes up the Western Front runs through a wide variety of landscapes in south-west Belgium, north-eastern and eastern France. The battle lines wind their way across the countryside from the sand dunes and flat, reclaimed sea level land on the Belgian coast in the north, to the mountain peaks at 1,400 metres (4,500 feet) above sea level in the Vosges mountain range at its southern end. From a geographical point of view the range of landscapes on which the Western Front battlefields were established include sand, clay, chalk and rock, rivers, canals, valleys and cliffs, ridges and mountains, plains, forests and swamps. When visiting the battlefields it can be seen how the geological make-up of the ground and the peculiarities of the landscape inevitably played a major part in influencing strategy, tactics, development of new weaponry and fighting techniques in the battles of the Western Front. Map of the 1914-1918 Western Front Battlefields Antwerp

World War I History - World War I My TV provider is not listed. Why not? We are currently working on adding more TV providers. Please check back frequently to see if your TV provider has been added. NZHistory, New Zealand history online Anzac poppy The red poppy has become a symbol of war remembrance the world over. People in many countries wear the poppy to remember those who died in war or who still serve.

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