background preloader

Developing a growth mindset in the classroom

Developing a growth mindset in the classroom
There’s a free info graphic version of this article. To download it, click here. As a kid I wanted to become a cliché when I grew up so I bought a guitar and grew my hair. I successfully learnt all the chords but struggled to combine them in a meaningful way (perhaps I should’ve joined an experimental jazz band instead of churning out 1980s power ballads). When my dreams of rock stardom eventually withered on the vine, I turned my attention to mastering magic, then to conquering chess, and to all manner of other hobbies. What all these childhood endeavours had in common – apart from their mutual failure – was that I took it for granted that I’d have to work hard at them, I knew I’d have to practise endlessly and that I wouldn’t become expert overnight. I played that old six-string every night after school till my fingers bled, readily accepting that improvement would be incremental. Most of us feel this way about our interests. Why should this be? Free info graphic version of this article:

http://mjbromleyblog.wordpress.com/2014/05/17/growth-mindset/

Related:  Growth Mindset DevelopmentGrowth MindsetMindset bilderGrowth mindset

Becoming a growth mindset school The idea of becoming a growth mindset school has been over a year in the making. Our Headteacher bought each member of SLT a copy of Mindset for Christmas, and it was the main agenda item at our annual senior team conference. Today I launched the idea of becoming a growth mindset school to all staff at our INSET day. This is the basis of the presentation I did. Our INSET session was for all staff – teaching, support, administrative, catering, site, network, technicians – everyone! It was essential for us, if we’re going to begin the process of shifting the culture of the school, that all staff are working together as one coherent team.

Presence, Not Praise: How To Cultivate a Healthy Relationship with Achievement by Maria Popova Why instilling admiration for hard work rather than raw talent is the key to fostering a well-adjusted mind. Despite ample evidence and countless testaments to the opposite, there persists a toxic cultural mythology that creative and intellectual excellence comes from a passive gift bestowed upon the fortunate few by the gods of genius, rather than being the product of the active application and consistent cultivation of skill. So what might the root of that stubborn fallacy be? Childhood and upbringing, it turns out, might have a lot to do.

Top Ten Tips for developing a Growth Mindset in your Classroom Be Critical. Students should expect and welcome criticism. They must also be given the opportunity to act on any criticism or critique. This will allow students to realise that through improving their work and responding to feedback, they can be better than they were. For this to happen, the culture of improvement needs to feel completely normal. What Believing in the Possibilities Can Do For Learning and Teaching By Thom Markham In medicine, the placebo effect is well known, but still mysterious. Through some unknown connection between mind and body, placebos produce changes in brain states, immune systems, blood pressure and hormone levels. Although most of us think of a placebo as a sugar pill, in fact it’s any intervention in which beliefs produce measurable changes in physiology, and thus performance.

Why the Growth Mindset is the Only Way to Learn “You’re too old to learn a foreign language.” “I couldn’t work on computers. I’m just not good with them.” Article According to a Stanford psychologist, you’ll reach new heights if you learn to embrace the occasional tumble. One day last November, psychology professor Carol Dweck welcomed a pair of visitors from the Blackburn Rovers, a soccer team in the United Kingdom’s Premier League. The Rovers’ training academy is ranked in England’s top three, yet performance director Tony Faulkner had long suspected that many promising players weren’t reaching their potential.

Growth Mindsets: Creating Motivation and Productivity The key to success and achieving our goals is not necessarily persistence, hard work and focus. These behaviours are the by-product of something else. What is actually critical to our success is our mindset. Mindsets are beliefs about ourselves and our most basic qualities, such as intelligence, talents and personality. We all have innate talents and skills, things that we are naturally good at or that set us apart from other people. The trap that we can fall into is believing that we are special, that we are smarter than other people and do not have to work hard to be successful.

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved. However, in my work, I have found that the notion of developing a growth mindset is as equally applicable to staff and teacher performance as it is to students. This article begins with a brief discussion about the difference between the two mindsets, what that means for education, and concludes with some ideas for how school leaders might seek to develop a growth mindset amongst their staff. According to Dweck:

The Learning Myth: Why I'll Never Tell My Son He's Smart By: Salman Khan Join the #YouCanLearnAnything movement My 5-year-­old son has just started reading. How To Weave Growth Mindset Into School Culture Adilene Rodriguez admits she has always struggled with academics. Especially in middle school she hated getting up early, found her classes boring and didn’t really see where it was all going. When she started her freshman year at Arroyo High School in San Lorenzo, California, just south of Oakland, she was a shy student who rarely spoke up in class and had little confidence in herself as a scholar. Rodriguez is now a senior and her approach to school has changed dramatically over her high school career.

Related: