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Tutorials from Evermotion - vray, 3dsmax, maya, photoshop, lightwave, modeling, XSI, maya

Tutorials from Evermotion - vray, 3dsmax, maya, photoshop, lightwave, modeling, XSI, maya
Related:  3D Artist Tutorials

Studio Lighting Techniques Studio Lighting Techniques by Chuck McKern Most photographers are interested in portrait lighting but most seem not to understand how to do it. The techniques that we are going to discuss can be used with either hot lights or studio strobes. You can use these same concepts with flash units, however you will not be able to see the effect until after you shoot. With practice you will be able to control the harshness of the light as well as being able to de-emphasize problem areas, such as a narrow face or a round face. If you get daring enough to use a hair light cones and snoots will allow you to control the light so that it only illuminates the hair and doesn’t spill onto the shoulders and face of your subject. Background lights can be used to illuminate the background, gaining more depth or separation in your image. The reflector cards do not need another light source, as they will reflect the light that is already there.

Getting Started with VR in Unreal Engine 4 - Tom Looman This guide is for anyone who is looking to get into developing for Virtual Reality projects in Unreal Engine 4. Covering Blueprint, C++, performance considerations and how to set up your VR kits for UE4. I highly recommend using the latest release of Unreal Engine 4 as VR is still being improved greatly with each new release. A few good places to reference are the official Oculus forums, the official VR documentation pages and the Unreal Engine VR Subforums. Unreal Engine 4.13 has a new built-in VR Template made in Blueprint. Setup your VR Device For this guide I will assume you have successfully installed your head-mounted display of choice (Visit Oculus Rift Setup or HTC Vive Pre Setup in case you did not). Unreal Engine 4 supports all the major devices and you don’t need to perform any hassle to setup your game project for VR. Before you launch the editor make sure your VR software is running, in the case of the HTC Vive this is the SteamVR app. Launching VR Preview VR Best Practices

Rigging a Character in 3DS Max - Spotlight Multimedia Set up character in usual pose facing the front and arms stretched wide. Select all body parts and hit Alt-X, which turns it semi-transparent. Right-click and freeze it. Attach Mesh to the Biped - Physique Modifier To attach the mesh to the skeleton we apply a Physique Modifier.Unfreeze you character by right clicking and Unfreeze AllSelect all components of the character (you may need to use the Select by Name list) and apply Physique from the modifier menu

Features One of the core functions of ZBrush has always been to provide artists the ability to create in an environment that allows for complete freedom of expression. This lack of technical barriers makes working within ZBrush feel like real-world sculpting and painting. It is a significant part of why so many artists have created ground-breaking work using ZBrush. With GoZ™ there is no need to invest time in setting up shading networks for your normal, displacement, and texture maps. With a single click of a button, GoZ™ will transfer your mesh to a GoZ™-enabled application of your choice and instantly set up all the appropriate shading networks for you. GoZ™ is based on core features of ZBrush. GoZ™ also supports the transfer of multiple Tools and/or SubTools between ZBrush and its target applications. Current GoZ™ enabled applications If you work with an application not listed above and want to add GoZ™ to it, please contact us for information on how to access our free GoZ™ SDK.

3D Lighting Tutorial by Amaan Akram, www.amaanakram.com Trying to simulate a real environment in an artificial one can be a daunting task. But even if you make your 3D rendering look absolutely photo-realistic, it doesn't guarantee that the image carries enough emotion to elicit a "wow" from the people viewing it. Making 3D renderings photo-realistic can be hard. Putting deep emotions in them can be even harder. However, if you plan out your lighting strategy for the mood and emotion that you want your rendering to express, you make the process easier for yourself. The overall thrust of this writing is to produce photo-realistic images by applying good lighting techniques. Each light source can be broken down in to 4 distinct components and analyzed accordingly. I consider the abovementioned terms to be self-explanatory, but I will give some description of each in the following text. I would like to give a few examples here from the world of photography. I shall now individually describe each of the 4 components of light. fig. 5.6

Xia Taptara Welcome to my channel - Xia Taptara art video tutorials. Welcome to my youtube channel my name is Xia TaptaraI am a concept artist for video games and films.I am here on a weekly basis not just my channel. My channel is about art so that people can learn about what out here for years. I have this channel since 2007 and it has a little bit over 400 videos. Alright so let's see what's here so my shadow basically this all myartwork to upload these two toy review it and we need basis so on the first block you see to watch next studies. If you are new to my channel, I also do a drawing tablet giveaway and I'm trying to do a giveaway monthly. I used-pencil HB-3b-Canson/Utretch sketchbook-Sketchbook Pro-PHOTOSHOP CS5 or CS6-Wacom Intuos5 Medium Pen Tablet Learn how to draw and paint both traditional and digital with FREE video tutorials and step by step images from profession concept artist Xia Taptara.

The Top Ten Tips of Texturing One way to create dirt has already been covered, and that's photo overlays. Those are great for general wear and tear on your texture. If you want small specific details, you'll need to use other techniques. Dust and dirt can be done very quickly with a solid brownish layer and a layer mask. Rust is a bit more tricky. I used to handpaint rust, but it always had a bit of a cartoony look, and I was never able to get crispy rust that looks convincing and real. That was until DennisPls shared his technique with me, which I've been using ever since. Good damage placement only requires one thing: logical thinking. That can be chipped paint, scratches, rust, etc. There is a sure chance that you'll find dust and dirt in such an area. This doesn't only work for small borders. The front of the forklift (1) is the area that will suffer the most, and will therefore have more damage than other parts.

An introduction to 3D on the Mac, Part I: models & textures The landscape of CG applications is vast and very confusing to 3D graphics newbies. These apps span the gamut from free modelers to beefy, Python-scriptable animation packages, standalone renderers and a lot of little programs that glue them all together into a complex and intimidating workflow. People looking to get into game development know that ZBrush is popular, but Mudbox looks good, too, so they're at a loss over which to learn. Program X looks like it does everything, but does it? What's “ambient occlusion” and why would I ever need it? These questions and more will complicate life for the aspiring 3D newb. 3D magazines provide helpful tutorials, but since every application is also a potential advertiser, they tend to avoid saying that one package is best for a particular task, or that program X really sucks at particle animation, and so on. Since this is a very broad approach, I have to limit the scope a bit. Part II of this series can be found here. Table of Contents

untitled Autodesk 3D Studio 4 - sous DOS Projet vierge Menu Création Insertion d'une caméra Menu Info Menu File Menu Views Menu Program Menu Network Mode Sélection Mode Modification Mode Surface Mode Lumières Mode Cameras Moteur de rendu Options du rendu Affichage 3d modelling workflow "for dummies" This is one way to do it, it is not THE way to do it. Also this is one way for now, things change fast. I reckon we will see the death of manual uv organizing pretty soon which will change things a lot. Having said that though, 1 - CREATION OF A BASE MESH (aka THE ROUGH SHAPE) I have two options to create a base mesh: using a polygon modelling approach, through suites like Maya, 3D studio max or Modo or go directly to a sculpting program like Zbrush or Mudbox. The first approach is perfect to obtain good, deformable mesh which are needed for animation and games but with the advent of retopology plugins we can jump directly to the second approach, which gives to the artist a more similar approach to classical sculpture. At the very beginning you can decide if the scale of your work is important. We use sculpting software because it is faster than any other method. The rough base mesh or stub, does not have to have optimal edge flow at all. 2 - SCULPTING Cheerio

cloth, la simulation de vêtements dans 3ds max avec 3ds Max 2014 sur Tuto Dans ce tuto dédié à 3ds Max, vous allez apprendre à vous servir du modificateur Cloth pour effectuer des simulations de vêtements. Vous utiliserez les fonctions de Cloth appliquées à des géométries polygonales mais surtout du Garment Maker (fabricant de vêtement) pour réaliser des simulations réalistes de drapeau, vêtements, déchirement de vêtements ou autres objets mous... Plusieurs leçons vous permettront de maîtriser ce modificateur pour au final être capable d'appliquer à un personnage animé, une simulation de robe ou tout autres simulations de vêtements... Les fichiers de travail sont fournis. Vous pouvez suivre ce tuto sur toutes les versions de 3ds Max même si le tuto est réalisé sous la version 2014. La version de démo de 3ds Max est disponible ici : Version de démo de 3ds max. Bon tuto ! Jetez un oeil à ces autres tuto 3ds Max 2014 Pour vous faire un avis, voici un extrait de quelques secondes. FrenchSchoolofCG , formateur certifié Toutes les formations de FrenchSchoolofCG

An introduction to 3D on the Mac, Part I: models & textures The landscape of CG applications is vast and very confusing to 3D graphics newbies. These apps span the gamut from free modelers to beefy, Python-scriptable animation packages, standalone renderers and a lot of little programs that glue them all together into a complex and intimidating workflow. People looking to get into game development know that ZBrush is popular, but Mudbox looks good, too, so they're at a loss over which to learn. Program X looks like it does everything, but does it? What's “ambient occlusion” and why would I ever need it? These questions and more will complicate life for the aspiring 3D newb. 3D magazines provide helpful tutorials, but since every application is also a potential advertiser, they tend to avoid saying that one package is best for a particular task, or that program X really sucks at particle animation, and so on. Since this is a very broad approach, I have to limit the scope a bit. Part II of this series can be found here. Table of Contents

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