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Citizen Journalism - What Is Citizen Journalism? What Is Citizen Journalism? Put very simply, citizen journalism is when private individuals do essentially what professional reporters do - report information. That information can take many forms, from a podcast editorial to a report about a city council meeting on a blog. It can include text, pictures, audio and video.

Independent Media Center West Papua: Neglected genocide - 29 Nov 2013 Indonesian police use Shootings, killings, beatings, arrests on West Papuan independence rallies Indonesian police have opened fire on peaceful protesters in Jayapura, with at least four gunshot wounds and one death. West Papuan activists and families have been forced to flee to the jungle for safety. Indonesian security forces are conducting scores of raids, sweeps and offensives against West Papuan civilians.

Foreign Policy View the photos. On a recent trip to Afghanistan, British Defense Secretary Liam Fox drew fire for calling it "a broken 13th-century country." The most common objection was not that he was wrong, but that he was overly blunt. He's hardly the first Westerner to label Afghanistan as medieval. Former Blackwater CEO Erik Prince recently described the country as inhabited by "barbarians" with "a 1200 A.D. mentality." Many assume that's all Afghanistan has ever been -- an ungovernable land where chaos is carved into the hills.

Hyperlocal Journalism - What is Hyperlocal Journalism? Hyperlocal journalism, sometimes called microlocal journalism, refers to coverage of events and topics on an extremely small, local scale. An example might be a website that covers a specific neighborhood or even a particular section or block of a neighborhood. Hyperlocal journalism focuses on news that would usually not be covered by larger mainstream media outlets, which tend to follow stories of interest to a citywide, statewide or regional audience. For instance, a hyperlocal journalism site might include an article about the local Little League baseball team, an interview with a World War II vet who lives in the neighborhood, or the sale of a home down the street.

Adbusters Culturejammer Headquarters The United States, locked in the kind of twilight disconnect that grips dying empires, is a country entranced by illusions. It spends its emotional and intellectual energy on the trivial and the absurd. It is captivated by the hollow stagecraft of celebrity culture as the walls crumble. This celebrity culture giddily licenses a dark voyeurism into other people’s humiliation, pain, weakness and betrayal. Day after day, one lurid saga after another, whether it is Michael Jackson, Britney Spears [or Miley Cyrus], enthralls the country … despite bank collapses, wars, mounting poverty or the criminality of its financial class. The virtues that sustain a nation-state and build community, from honesty to self-sacrifice to transparency to sharing, are ridiculed each night on television as rubes stupid enough to cling to this antiquated behavior are voted off reality shows.

Digital journalism Fewer barriers to entry, lowered distribution costs, and diverse computer networking technologies have led to the widespread practice of digital journalism.[3] It has democratized the flow of information that was previously controlled by traditional media including newspapers, magazines, radio, and television.[4] A greater degree of creativity can be exercised with digital journalism when compared to traditional journalism and traditional media.[5] The digital aspect can be central to the journalistic message or not, and remains within the creative control of the writer, editor, and/or publisher.[6] Overview[edit] There is no absolute agreement as to what constitutes digital journalism. History[edit]

The American Prospect You've Got Questions ... We've Got Answers What is The American Prospect? 4 Traits of an Effective (or Obsessed) Community Manager Photo Credit: Niall Kennedy Last week one of my friends on Twitter, Brett Mickelson, tweeted at me in response to my blog post “Why Newspapers Need Community Managers.” He asked me to talk about what news organizations should look for in someone that they’re considering hiring in a community management-type role. I told him that I would write about it soon.

About The Lede The Lede is a blog that remixes national and international news stories, adding information gleaned from the Web or gathered through original reporting to supplement articles in The New York Times and provide fresh perspectives on events. We also hope to draw readers in to the global conversation about the news taking place online. Readers are encouraged to take part in the blogging by using the comments threads to suggest links to relevant material elsewhere on the Web or by submitting eyewitness accounts, photographs or video of news events. The Lede is assembled in the main newsroom of The New York Times and turns into a platform for live updates when breaking news events demand real-time coverage. Why Newspapers Need Community Managers Photo credit: Alana Fisher The term “community manager” has been around for a while. However with the growth of social media in business, it’s turned into more of a buzz term.

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