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New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed

New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed
Arten Popov Teaching students that intelligence can grow and blossom with effort – rather than being a fixed trait they’re just born with – is gaining traction in progressive education circles. And new research from Stanford is helping to build the case that nurturing a “growth mindset” can help many kids understand their true potential. The new research involves larger, more rigorous field trials that provide some of the first evidence that the social psychology strategy can be effective when implemented in schools on a wide scale. Even a one-time, 30-minute online intervention can spur academic gains for many students, particularly those with poor grades. The premise is that these positive effects can stick over years, leading for example to higher graduation rates; but long-term data is still needed to confirm that. However, all the original intervention studies were small and left some educators and policymakers unconvinced. A Light Touch Leads to Meaningful Change

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/07/new-research-students-benefit-from-learning-that-intelligence-is-not-fixed/

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Growth Mindsets: Creating Motivation and Productivity The key to success and achieving our goals is not necessarily persistence, hard work and focus. These behaviours are the by-product of something else. What is actually critical to our success is our mindset. Mindsets are beliefs about ourselves and our most basic qualities, such as intelligence, talents and personality. We all have innate talents and skills, things that we are naturally good at or that set us apart from other people. The trap that we can fall into is believing that we are special, that we are smarter than other people and do not have to work hard to be successful.

Growth Mindset: Personal Accountability and Reflection I am an adjunct faculty for several teacher education and educational technology programs. I have been so for a few decades. During that time I have noticed the changing nature of student behaviors and expectations regarding their class projects and assignments. Students seem to expect perfect grades for not so perfect work. Tools for metacognition Metacognition is an important part of intentional learning, since it involves actively thinking about what you know, what you don’t know, and how you can get better at knowing and applying what you know. A mantra for metacognition State the learning problem with some specificity: identify what you want to know and what you want to do with that knowledgeChoose strategies to solve the learning problem—draw upon your own prior knowledge and the knowledge of othersObserve how you used the strategies—keep a learning journal or blogEvaluate the results: What worked? What didn’t work?Rinse and repeat: Apply successful strategies to new learning problems

Why the Growth Mindset is the Only Way to Learn “You’re too old to learn a foreign language.” “I couldn’t work on computers. I’m just not good with them.” Five Reasons to Stop Saying "Good Job!" (**) - Alfie Kohn September 2001 By Alfie Kohn NOTE: An abridged version of this article was published in Parents magazine in May 2000 with the title “Hooked on Praise.” For a more detailed look at the issues discussed here — as well as a comprehensive list of citations to relevant research — please see the books Punished by Rewards and Unconditional Parenting. Para leer este artículo en Español, haga clic aquí.

Top Ten Tips for developing a Growth Mindset in your Classroom Be Critical. Students should expect and welcome criticism. They must also be given the opportunity to act on any criticism or critique. This will allow students to realise that through improving their work and responding to feedback, they can be better than they were. For this to happen, the culture of improvement needs to feel completely normal. The Educator with a Growth Mindset: A Staff Workshop I had the great privilege of facilitating a staff workshop on growth mindsets for the teachers and staff at Carlos Rosario International School and more recently at ISTE 2015. Participants were given access to the slide deck in order interact with the slides and resources during the workshop. What follows are the activities along with some of the resources used during the workshop.

Smart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to Learn Teaching Strategies Bruce Guenter What’s the key to effective learning? One intriguing body of research suggests a rather riddle-like answer: It’s not just what you know. It’s what you know about what you know. To put it in more straightforward terms, anytime a student learns, he or she has to bring in two kinds of prior knowledge: knowledge about the subject at hand (say, mathematics or history) and knowledge about how learning works.

4 Ways to Encourage a Growth Mindset in the Classroom EdSurge Newsletters Receive weekly emails on edtech products, companies, and events that matter. Contrary to popular belief, high achievement isn’t merely a product of talent and ability. How Educators Can Assist Learners in Developing a Growth Mindset I have written, described, and presented about the growth mindset in education settings, see This post delves a little deeper, and hopefully provides some additional ideas for how educators can assist their learners in developing a growth mindset. Part of facilitating a growth mindset within learners involves changing some preconceptions of the role of teacher. One such change is in viewing one of the roles as being that of a coach.

Developing a growth mindset in the classroom There’s a free info graphic version of this article. To download it, click here. As a kid I wanted to become a cliché when I grew up so I bought a guitar and grew my hair. How to use feedback to your advantage SmartBlogs We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve. – Bill Gates As a teacher, you will certainly be the recipient of some negative feedback, solicited or otherwise.

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