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What an Effective Teacher's Classroom Looks Like

What an Effective Teacher's Classroom Looks Like
Another school year is approaching and many novice teachers are preparing to enter their own classrooms for the first time. To help them on their way, MiddleWeb is publishing a series of brief articles offering good advice and food for thought. What We See in Effective and Ineffective Classrooms by Annette Breaux and Todd Whitaker In our ongoing observations of teachers, we continue to notice that the most effective teachers’ classrooms all look uncannily similar. And, of course, the same can be said for the less effective teachers—their classrooms all look uncannily similar. It seems that no matter where we go, the students all act the same in the classrooms of the most effective teachers. Let’s take a look inside of less effective teachers’ classrooms first. Here is what they all seem to have in common: ◆ The classroom looks disorganized. Now for the good news We could go on, but we think we’ve made the point. Here’s what we saw in the classrooms of the most effective teachers:

http://www.middleweb.com/16325/effective-teachers-classroom-looks-like/

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A Wonderful Poster on Failure July13, 2014 I have always believed that teachers (and people in general) MUST have an open midset; one that tolerates and celebrates mistakes and errors; one that looks at failure as an opportunity for a better beginning. It is through falling down that we stand up robust and it is through misfortunes that we gather our strength to live the life we want and pursue our dreams. If we want to raise up socially and emotionally strong students who can face up and overcome the hardships of life, an important key to this is to teach (and model) them about failure. We need to show them that failure is a healthy sign and a good omen for a healthy life experience. They need to view failure as an attempt for deep reflection and meditation about what worked or did not work.

10 Engaging Games for Summer Learning For this week's Top Picks List Friday, we're featuring games for summer learning. Anything remotely school related is a total summer-break bummer. But that doesn't mean the learning has to stop. Kids are sure to become engrossed in these great at-home games that are also teacher approved. To see the rating of each app, game, or website, visit the Top-Picks List, Ultra-absorbing Games for Undercover Summer Learning. Photo by Amanda Tipton. 50 Kick-Ass Websites You Need to Know About It's time to update the entries in your browser's links toolbar. But with recent estimates putting the size of the internet at well more than 100 million distinct websites, it's getting harder and harder to get a handle on all the great stuff that's out there. That's why we've compiled this list. And unlike some lists you may have seen, which try to name the very "best" websites, but end up just telling you a lot of stuff you already know, we've chosen instead to highlight 50 of our favorite sites that fly under most people's radar. Think of it as the Maximum PC blog roll (remember those?).

20 Signs You’re Actually Making A Difference As A Teacher Other Data: 20 Signs You’re Actually Making A Difference As A Teacher by Saga Briggs, opencolleges.edu.au You plan. You assess. You network. You collaborate. Education Week (This is the last post in a two-part series on this topic. You can see Part One here.) Katie Keeler asked: 8 Lessons For Teacher Growth 8 Lessons For Teacher Growth by Terry Heick 1. Rumsey Historical Map Collection The David Rumsey Map Collection was started over 25 years ago and contains more than 150,000 maps. The collection focuses on rare 18th and 19th century maps of North and South America, although it also has maps of the World, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Oceania. The collection includes atlases, wall maps, globes, school geographies, pocket maps, books of exploration, maritime charts, and a variety of cartographic materials including pocket, wall, children's, and manuscript maps.

Employers Challenge to Educators: Make School Relevant to Students’ Lives Andreas Levers/Flickr Business leaders and economic thinkers are worried that today’s students aren’t leaving school with the skills they’ll need to succeed in the workplace. Representatives from tech companies and hiring experts are looking for applicants who show individuality, confidence in their abilities, ability to identify and communicate their strengths, and who are capable of thinking on their feet. At the recent Next New World conference hosted by New York Times columnist Tom Friedman, panelists addressed the question of how the American education system can better prepare students to meet the evolving challenges of the 21st century economy. Every panelist agreed that right now, the U.S. does not have a system that produces students that meet those needs. “The problem is not to get incrementally better with our current education system,” said Tony Wagner, expert in residence at Harvard’s Innovation Lab.

26 Life Changing Lessons to Learn from Mahatma Gandhi Mahatma Gandhi, one of the many beautiful souls that has inspired and continues to inspire so many of us taught me so many valuable and life changing lessons. And in today’s post, I have gathered some of his most inspiring quotes and compiled them into the 26 Life Changing Lessons to Learn from Mahatma Gandhi. Enjoy! 1. Secrets of teachers who love their jobs: always be a learner A few weeks ago, I published an article called 7 ways for teachers to beat the Sunday blues. It was shared over 12,000 times on Facebook, which gives you an idea of how many teachers can relate to that feeling of work-related anxiety on the weekends. But a handful of teachers on social media commented that they don’t experience this phenomenon.

Remember Our Calling? Using Data and Evidence to Save One Child a Time — FIP Your School Ohio Blog In looking at scores from one assessment I gave on the works and schools of thought of the Middle Ages, I discovered an inconsistency that bothered me. One of my students had earned a D on the summative after scoring highly on all of the formative assessments. He had prominently participated during class discussions and articulated himself very well in doing so. He had absolutely mastered the material at a much deeper level than most in the class, and yet he had earned a troublingly low score on the summative. My self-reflective instincts took over: How had I let this happen? How had I failed this student?

7 Secrets of the Super Organized A few years ago, my life was a mess. So was my house, my desk, my mind. Then I learned, one by one, a few habits that got me completely organized. Am I perfect? Of course not, and I don’t aim to be. But I know where everything is, I know what I need to do today, I don’t forget things most of the time, and my house is uncluttered and relatively clean (well, as clean as you can get when you have toddlers and big kids running around).

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