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Borrow Modern eBooks

Borrow Modern eBooks
Click here to skip to this page's main content. Hello! Open Library is participating in our eBook lending program. Browse the growing lending library of over 250,000 eBooks! Site Search Log in / Sign Up One web page for every book. Read | Borrow | How it Works | Stats Borrow Modern eBooks View the previous editions View the next editions Loading books... Open Library is unaware of any editions about this subject published between 1456 & 2016. Search the Lending Library More search options AroundThe Library Problem? Debug Stats Details Open Library is an initiative of the Internet Archive, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, building a digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital form.Other projects include the Wayback Machine, archive.org and archive-it.org Your use of the Open Library is subject to the Internet Archive's Terms of Use.

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Metaphors and Threshold Concepts for Research — Katie Day I asked the audience at Research Relevance to suggest new metaphors -- and here are some responses: a search engine like Google is like "trail mix" - returning results include some M&Ms, some raisins, some peanuts - while a database is like a whole bag of M&Ms -- all good resultsa group project is like a music quartet - each contributing to the whole beautiful sounda database is like a bathtub filled with water for a particular size and purpose, while Google is like a river, whose flow is unpredictable and aimless I particularly like (the dead white male professor) Kenneth Burke's description of the metaphor of the "unending conversation" of academic discourse -> "Imagine that you enter a parlor. You come late.

Listen to the Best English Podcasts, AudioBooks with Transcript Stories Podcast A collection of short stories written by famous writers like Shakespeare and Wordsworth. 6 minute English BBC 6 Minute English is one of the best weekly audio podcast for English learners. 23 Great Library Blogs Let’s say that you are a school librarian, and let’s say you’ve decided that like many of the teachers in your school, you too are ready to use a blog to connect with parents and students, to share your latest news and events, or perhaps to develop your own personal learning network (PLN). You’re motivated and ready to begin, but you may have some lingering questions about the best way to get started and maybe you’re not entirely sure how to organize your new blog. Unfortunately, searching the internet for “how to create a great library blog” doesn’t yield many helpful answers. There are some sites that come up in that search that appear useful, but overall it seems to make more sense to just visit library blogs, see what works and what doesn’t, and craft your blog around the ideas you like the best. To make that process easier, we’ve compiled a list of library blogs on Edublogs.

Story Title Menu (Classic Short Stories) stories such as: A Day in the Country (Chekhov), The Cask of Amontillado (Poe), Bellflower (de Maupassant), Beware of the Dog (Dahl), The Door in the Wall (Wells), Araby (Joyce), The Boarded Window (Bierce) stories such as: The Griffin and the Minor Canon (Stockton), Ethan Brand (Hawthorne), The Hairpin (de Maupassant), A Haunted House (Woolf), The Girls in Their Summer Dresses (Shaw), The Gift of the Magi (Henry) stories such as: The Minister's Black Veil (Hawthorne), The Most Dangerous Game (Connell), The Inn (de Maupassant), Leiningen Versus the Ants (Woolf), The Lottery Ticket (Chekhov), The Monkey's Paw (Jacobs) stories such as: A Passion in the Desert (Balzac), The Sniper (O'Flaherty), Rip Van Winkle (Irving), A Piece of String (de Maupassant), The Open Window (Saki), Rocking-Horse Winner (Lawrence), The Soldier's Peaches (Cloete)

Getting to E: The State of the School Ebook Market Illustration by Ken Orvidas. By fits and starts, school libraries are moving toward ebook adoption; the question is how fast. While publishers and distributors are evolving their offerings to appeal to students and educators, the transition to ebooks has its challenges, ranging from inadequate technology to some students’ preference for print books. Still, the movement is definitively toward e, as an anticipated $30-million deal for e-materials between Amazon and the New York City Department of Education shows. OverDrive, a leading distributor of ebooks to schools and libraries, saw its highest-ever single day of checkouts—more than 500,000 ebooks—in June, according to David Burleigh, the company’s director of marketing.

45 Ways To Avoid Using The Word 'Very' Writers Write is your one-stop resource for writers. Use these 45 ways to avoid using the word ‘very’ to improve your writing. Good writers avoid peppering their writing with qualifiers like ‘very’ and ‘really’. Transforming our Learning Environment into a Space of Possibilities: Serendipity: The next chapter of my story Serendipity means finding something good without looking for it. After watching the movie many years ago, I fell in love with the word and idea that a "fortunate accident" or "chance encounter" could have the power to change your life. Since then, I have come to realize that everything happens for a reason. We may not know why in our present reality, but we can trust that there is a bigger "plan" for us…

Flash Games - Learn English ↓ Skip to Main Content Flash Games Flash Games Match the images to the English words. Drag the images over the vocab items with this fun game. mamascout: 25 mini-adventures in the library We spend many afternoons at our neighborhood library. At one point our time switched from going to find particular books, to just hanging out. For hours. Reading, exploring, asking questions, sharing, talking.... I wanted to share a quick list of fun things you can do at the library other than just check out books. Any of these ideas would be a great boredom buster.

Francis by Richard Hickey Written by novelist & screenwriter Dave Eggars, for the ever-popular radio show This American Life, animated film Francis is the tense tale of the unexplained happenings on a lake in the middle of an Ontario nature preserve. Brought to life by Not to Scale director Richard Hickey and a team of 40 animators, this captivating short perfectly blends the worlds of outstanding production values with engaging storytelling. Her mouth went dry. She held onto each side of the boat, and now she could only wait to see if it happened again. One night on a family camping trip to Quetico park, the reckless raven-haired Francis waits until her family have fallen asleep and takes a rowing boat out to the middle of the lake. Hoping to find a quiet spot where the teenager can lay on her back, stare at the sky and write in her journal, her expectations of a peaceful night at one with nature are soon shattered when an unexpected noise comes from the water below.

Helping Students Learn to Cite Their Sources A MiddleWeb Blog By Jody Passanisi When I first started teaching writing in history class a number of years ago, I was totally focused on the students just getting their ideas out and being able to write on historical themes. I wanted them to be able to internalize the basic structure of an argumentative essay, make an argument, and back it up.

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