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Kirby Ferguson: Embrace the remix

Kirby Ferguson: Embrace the remix

https://www.ted.com/talks/kirby_ferguson_embrace_the_remix

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Images of the Week 01.08.12 Miami Special Part II Posted on January 8, 2012 Here is the 2nd half of the Miami images we captured for you from the massive blocks long street installation party called Art Basel this year. Most of these pieces are legal, many are not. You can call them Street Art, but not all are actually on the street and many could also be classified as murals.

Synergetics and The Wellspring of Reality: Buckminster Fuller Against Specialization by Maria Popova “Only mind can discover how to do so much with so little as forever to be able to sustain and physically satisfy all humanity.” Writer Alvin Toffler once described architect, theorist, designer, and futurist Buckminster Fuller as “one of the most-powerful myth-makers and myth-exposers of our time … a controversial, constructive, endlessly energetic metaphor-maker who sees things differently from the rest of us, and thereby makes us see ourselves afresh” — perhaps the richest and most accurate account of a mind to whom we owe more than we realize. Today, the concept of synergy permeates everything from boardrooms to artspeak to hipster dinner party chatter — but it was Fuller who coined it as cultural currency in pioneering the study of synergentics, which concerns itself with the “behavior of whole systems unpredicted by the behavior of their parts taken separately.”

Doppelgänger In fiction and folklore, a doppelgänger or doppelga(e)nger (/ˈdɒpᵊlˌɡɛŋə/ or /-ˌɡæŋə/; German: [ˈdɔpəlˌɡɛŋɐ], literally "double-goer") is a look-alike or double of a living person, sometimes portrayed as a paranormal phenomenon, and in some traditions as a harbinger of bad luck. In other traditions and stories, they recognize one's 'double-goer' as an evil twin. The word 'doppelgänger' is often used in a more general sense to describe any person who physically or behaviorally resembles another person. Spelling[edit] The word doppelgänger is a loanword from German Doppelgänger, consisting of the two substantives Doppel (double) Gänger (walker or goer).[1][2] The singular and plural form are the same in German, but English usually prefers the plural "doppelgängers." It was first used by Jean Paul in the novel Siebenkäs (1796), and his newly coined word is explained by a footnote.

Evoking Memories: Communicating via Memory in Design by Angela Riechers Memory is a powerful communicative device, and many designers struggle to decide when to employ it. These historical examples illuminate why and when it works. The Relationship Between Creativity and Mental Illness by Maria Popova The science behind the “tortured genius” myth and what it reveals about how the creative mind actually works. “I think I’ve only spent about ten percent of my energies on writing,” Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Katherine Anne Porter confessed in a 1963 interview. “The other ninety percent went to keeping my head above water.”

The Wonderfully Dismal Kingdom of Banksy Posted on August 26, 2015 Banksy has ventured into the entertaining resort business. One that would possibly be your last resort. A scathing social and political critique of any number of targets that routinely come under the purview of this artist/curator/commentator/showman, this big tent brings everyone inside for a beating. Rampant capitalism, civic hypocrisy, the war industry, advertising deceit, an encroaching police state, environmental destruction, the widening gap in social equality, xenophobia with its inherent racism, and our insatiable penchant for sunny denial are a partial list of woes addressed. If you don’t feel sickened or guilty after visiting Dismaland perhaps you could affect a certain smugness that says, “Finally, someone is talking about all of these important issues that I’ve been going on about.”

Milton Glaser on Art, Technology, and the Secret of Life by Maria Popova “You learn more and more that everything exists at once with its opposite, so the contradictions of life are never-ending and somehow the mediation between these opposites is the game of life.” Few things today are truly iconic, but the I♥NY logo is among them. Digital literacies in the age of remix I presented this latest version of my digital literacies model at the 2016 Solstice Conference hosted by Edge Hill University. The slide is from my keynote presentation on digital storytelling. The components in the model are by no means exhaustive - I acknowledge there are many more literacies, some of which are emergent due to new technologies and services. What I have attempted here is to represent what I consider to be the most important, or most regularly observed literacies and try to place them in context. It's also important to note that these do not replace the conventional literacies of reading and writing, speaking and listening, but are supplemental to them. I have added three dimensions.

Four Documentaries That Capture the Globalization of Street Art Konair painting from Las Calles Hablan (2013) (Courtesy Onist Film and the filmmakers) As an ever-increasing amount of street art documentaries appear online, along with pleas for Kickstarter donations to prospective films, I, a longtime street art enthusiast, find it near impossible and entirely overwhelming to try to watch all of these films. With the recent release of yet another street art documentary, Las Calles Hablan (2013), I took a look at four fascinating films documenting the global street art movement, with the hope of easing the decision-making process for wishy-washy observers like me.

John Locke on Knowledge and the Folly of Our Borrowed Opinions by Maria Popova “The understanding, like the eye, whilst it makes us see and perceive all other things, takes no notice of itself; and it requires an art and pains to set it at a distance and make it its own object.” English philosopher and physician John Locke (August 29, 1632–October 28, 1704), endures as one of the most influential figures of the Enlightenment, whose work shaped the course of modern thought, permeated the American Declaration of Independence, and laid the foundation for today’s understanding of the self and human identity. One of his most central tenets was the idea, radical at the time, that we are born without innate ideas and that knowledge instead is acquired through direct experience and sense perception.

Grandmaster Flash breaks down Netflix's new series "The Get Down." "I was reckless with records. I would put my hands all over them." Courtesy Grandmaster Flash As a music-obsessed teen growing up in the Bronx in the 1970s, Joseph Saddler noticed that every party song had one drum break or keyboard solo that made dancers go wild. What if you could string those fragments together to create a nonstop frenzy? "A call and an email came in. The Psychology Behind Messy Rooms: Why The Most Creative People Flourish In Clutter All our lives, we’ve been told to “be organized.” Organization has always been pegged as a direct key to success. Whether at home, school or in your bunk at camp, organization is something that has been instilled in everyone pretty much from birth. On the other hand, being messy has been equally condemned and made to be a quick path to failure.

Why I want you to steal my ideas Please don’t steal my car. If you drive away with it, I won’t have it any more, which is a real hassle. Please don’t steal my identity or my reputation either. Neither travels well, and all the time you’re using it, you’re degrading something that belongs to me. Austin Kleon on 10 Things Every Creator Should Remember But We Often Forget by Maria Popova What T.S. Eliot has to do with genetics and the optimal investment theory for your intellectual life. Much has been said about the secrets of creativity and where good ideas come from, but most of that wisdom can be lost on young minds just dipping their toes in the vast and tumultuous ocean of self-initiated creation. Some time ago, artist and writer Austin Kleon — one of my favorite thinkers, a keen observer of and participant in the creative economy of the digital age — was invited to give a talk to students, the backbone for which was a list of 10 things he wished he’d heard as a young creator:

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