background preloader

Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today

Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today
The Centers for Disease Control tells us that in recent years there has been a jump in the percentage of young people diagnosed with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder, commonly known as ADHD: 7.8 percent in 2003 to 9.5 percent in 2007 and to 11 percent in 2011. The reasons for the rise are multiple, and include changes in diagnostic criteria, medication treatment and more awareness of the condition. In the following post, Angela Hanscom, a pediatric occupational therapist and the founder of TimberNook, a nature-based development program designed to foster creativity and independent play outdoors in New England, suggests yet another reason more children are being diagnosed with ADHD, whether or not they really have it: the amount of time kids are forced to sit while they are in school. This appeared on the TimberNook blog. State-based Prevalence Data of ADHD Diagnosis (2011-2012): Children CURRENTLY diagnosed with ADHD (Centers for Disease Control) By Angela Hanscom

The Transformation of Justin Bieber From a White Youth to a Black Man | Darron T. Smith, Ph.D. In what took Usher most of his 20-year music career to accomplish, it took Justin Bieber just a short five years to reap similar financial success and actually surpass his mentor. Usher Raymond IV was an R&B phenom who started his career much like Bieber as a young teen and is among America's top selling artists. He saw something special in the young star during their initial meetings. But that does not explain the rate in which Bieber shot to fame compared to his current counterparts such as Jason Derulo, Trey Songz and even Chris Brown. In fact, Justin Bieber rose to financial prowess singing R&B/pop music faster than any other black entertainer, ever, despite this being a genre created by their own kin. This is something W.E.B. Black men and boys are "onstage" every day. Because blacks have little to no control over their social condition in life, cool pose then is a source of empowerment.

The right — and surprisingly wrong — ways to get kids to sit still in class Robbi Giuliano teaches fifth-graders as they sit on yoga balls at Westtown-Thornbury Elementary School Monday on Feb. 4, 2013, in West Chester, Pa. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) A post I published in July titled “Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today” seems to have struck a nerve with readers, who continue to read it in big numbers. The piece was by Angela Hanscom, a pediatric occupational therapist, who said that kids are being forced to sit for too long while they are in school and are being deprived of enough time for real physical activity. This, she said, is affecting their ability to learn and in some cases leading to improper ADHD diagnoses. Here is a follow-up post by Hanscom in which she talks about how to get kids moving in class and some of the mistakes teachers are making. By Angela Hanscom My last post, “Why so many kids can’t sit still in school today,” has and continues to generate tremendous feedback from around the world. However, when do we draw the line?

Nerd culture is destroying Silicon Valley - Quartz My first girlfriend was someone I met through a MUD, and I had to fly 7,000 miles to see her in person. I read a paper version of the Jargon File at 15 and it became my bible. Just reading its descriptions of the internet I knew it was world-changing, even before the web, and as soon as I could I snuck into the local university computer labs with a borrowed account to experience the wonder of Usenet, FTP, and Gopher. I chose my college because Turing had once taught there, and the designer of the ARM chip would be one of my lecturers. I’m a grown man who still plays Dungeons and Dragons. My point is that if anyone can claim to be a nerd, it’s me. Nobody really understood why I took a poorly-paid job in game programming after college instead of joining a bank, and most people’s eyes would glaze over when I mentioned I worked in computers. Over the last decade, that’s changed. Startups are sexy. And that’s where the problem lies. What would something better look like?

Having a ball in the classroom Students in Robbi Giuliano's fifth-grade class sit on yoga balls as they complete their assignments at Westtown-Thornbury Elementary School in West Chester, Pa. (MATT ROURKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS) By — Kathy Matheson, Associated Press March 12, 2013 Teacher Robbi Giuliano thinks she has found a solution to fidgety fifth-graders: Get rid of traditional desk chairs and have the kids sit on yoga balls. Wait a minute: How could big, bright, rolly balls help kids be less wiggly? Giuliano says the inflatable bouncers have made her students at Pennsylvania’s Westtown-Thornbury Elementary School better able to focus on lessons while improving their balance and core strength. “I have more attentive children,” Giuliano said. The giant rubber spheres, also called stability balls, come in different sizes, colors and degrees of firmness. Research shows that linking activity with education helps kids learn better, says John Kilbourne, a professor at Grand Valley State University in Michigan. Continue reading

Addicting Info – Rich Guys Try To Kick Poor Kids Off Their Own Playing Field, Get A Life Lesson Instead (VIDEO) This is what happened when a group of wealthy, white tech workers in San Francisco attempted to kick a group of local kids off their playing field — they got a life lesson they’ll never forget. The Mission Playing Field, enjoyed for decades as a shared public space, is being privatized by San Francisco Parks & Recreation in collusion with the private City Fields Foundation. Without community approval, the private foundation decided to issue costly permits to use the small traditional pick-up soccer field. So, the inevitable happens and the entitled show up and try to kick the neighborhood kids off of the field at prime time without even showing their “permit.” They don’t want to wait their turn and play with everyone else. One of them is even heard off-camera crying: “Who cares about the community?!” The kids hold their ground and explain that they’ve been playing this field for years and the rules are: you take your turn or you do not get one.

Does Your Classroom Cultivate Student Resilience? | Edutopia Over 100 years ago, the great African American educator Booker T. Washington spoke about resilience: I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles overcome while trying to succeed. Research has since established resilience as essential for human thriving, and an ability necessary for the development of healthy, adaptable young people. The Capacity to Rebuild and Grow From Adversity Resilience is not a genetic trait. Many teachers are familiar with Stanford professor Carol Dweck's important work with growth mindsets, a way of thinking that helps children connect growth with hard work and perseverance. Resilience is part of The Compass Advantage™ (a model designed for engaging families, schools, and communities in the principles of positive youth development) because the capacity to rebuild and grow from adversity is a key factor in achieving optimal mental and physical health. Five Ways to Cultivate Resilience 1.

City ends reserved soccer at Mission Playground after Dropbox flap The San Francisco Recreation and Park Department has decided to end reserved adult play at Mission Playground — the site of a video-recorded confrontation between tech workers and locals that went viral — after meeting with a group of neighborhood kids on Wednesday, according to department director Phil Ginsburg. Ginsburg said park officials met with a combination of kids and youth soccer advocates and came to the conclusion that, in this instance, the need for unstructured play on weekday evenings outweighed the desire to accommodate adults. “The most compelling suggestions came from the kids who said, ‘This is a safe place we can come and play and we feel like we need more time,’” said Ginsburg. “Our first priority is kids. We are always striving to balance different types of play.” Youth teams will continue to be able to reserve the field after school until 7 p.m. The incident has become something of a political soccer ball.

Augmented eTwinning Reality - studio_augusto On the website The Teacher Garden there is a wide variety of ways to use QR codes in the classroom, such as managing library materials, writing prompts, assessing students, flipping the classroom and making lessons interactive, among many others. All this activities have been done by teachers of different subjects. In the blog post Interactive Bulletin Boards, third-grade teacher Terri Eichholz explains how she used QR codes in her classroom and engaged students and teachers from other classes in her project. She put her students' artwork on a bulleting board and placed a QR code on each piece. The QR code led the reader to an audio file with students reading their poems. Using QR code in the classroom by Denise Webster is yet another resource full of examples of best practice and ideas on using QR codes with your students.

The only guide to Gamergate you will ever need to read Anita Sarkeesian, the feminist writer and media critic who has been attacked in “Gamergate.” (Feminist Frequency/Flickr) Gamergate, the freewheeling catastrophe/social movement/misdirected lynchmob that has, since August, trapped wide swaths of the Internet in its clutches, has still — inexplicably! — not burned itself out. Late last week, when many of us thought we’d seen its end, the mob drove yet another woman from her home: This one, Brianna Wu, because she dared to tweet some jokes about the ongoing drama. Here at the Intersect, we have ignored Gamergate for as long as humanly possible — in large part because it’s been covered in enormous, impressive depth elsewhere, and in smaller part because we’re exhausted by the senseless, never-ending onslaught of Internet misogyny, which really can’t be explained in a blog post — or, frankly, anywhere else. What is Gamergate? Whatever Gamergate may have started as, it is now an Internet culture war. Why should I care about this?

50 Incredibly Useful Links For Learning & Teaching The English Language - Teaching a new language to non-native speakers may be one of the most challenging educational jobs out there, so ELL teachers can use all of the help they can get! Thankfully, many excellent resources for ELL and ESL exist online, from full-service websites to reference tools and communities, all designed to make the task of educating ELL students just a little bit easier and more effective. We’ve scoured the Internet to share 50 of the best of these resources, and we hope you’ll find lots of valuable content and tools through these incredibly useful links for ELL educators. Websites Resource tools, printables, and other great stuff for ELL educators are all available on these sites. Articles & Advice Check out resource lists, journal articles, and ideas for best practices in ELL on these links. Organizations Take advantage of the great opportunities and resources available from these organizations that benefit ELL teachers. Learning Resources Teaching Resources Reference Communities & Blogs

Whites riot over pumpkins in NH and Twitter turns it into epic lesson about Ferguson Police were forced to descend on Keene, New Hampshire Saturday night after students and outside agitators turned the city’s 24th annual Pumpkin Festival into “a destination for destructive and raucous behavior.” Those words — spoken by Keene State College President Anne Huot to CNN — only begin to describe the scene, which led to dozens of arrests and hospitalizations. One rioter, Steven French, told the Keene Sentinel that he traveled from Haverhill, Massachusetts to attend the festival because he knew it would be “f*cking wicked.” “It’s just like a rush. The police viewed the behavior of French and his cohorts less favorably, barricading streets and firing tear gas into crowds in an effort to disperse them. Meanwhile, on Twitter, users marveled at how different the police response to these unruly young adults was to another recent event: They then mocked the conservative response both to the Michael Brown shooting and the protests that occurred in its wake:

The First 5s with iPads Author's Note: This post expands on ideas that I originally shared last year on Edutopia. With the start of school approaching and the looming expectation of incorporating iPads into the curriculum becoming a reality, the big question many educators are asking is: "Where should I begin?" Last year, I wrote about 5 Steps for the First 5 Days. However, what about the five days after that? It can seem daunting to envision a year's worth of activities with iPads, but when taken in small chunks, it doesn't need to be intimidating. The First 5 Hours One of the great benefits of iPads is the immediate access to a camera and microphone. Take a picture of each student to use as a visual attendance sheet, to create avatars, or as an icebreaker. The pictures or videos captured during these initial activities could even be posted to a Padlet Wall to create a digital bulletin board. The First 5 Days The power of the iPad is how it can be used as a creation device. The First 5 Weeks Getting Started

Related: