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The Hard Part 

The Hard Part 
They never tell you in teacher school, and it’s rarely discussed elsewhere. It is never, ever portrayed in movies and tv shows about teaching. Teachers rarely bring it up around non-teachers for fear it will make us look weak or inadequate. Valerie Strauss in the Washington Post once put together a series of quotes to answer the question “How hard is teaching?” and asked for more in the comments section. My rant didn’t entirely fit there, so I’m putting it here, because it is on the list of Top Ten Things They Never Tell You in Teacher School. The hard part of teaching is coming to grips with this: There is never enough time. As a teacher, you can see what a perfect job in your classroom would look like. You know all this, but you can also do the math. 110 papers about the view of death in American Romantic writing times 15 minutes to respond with thoughtful written comments equals — wait! Every year you get better. But every day is still educational triage. Trust us.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peter-greene/the-hardest-part-teaching_b_5554448.html

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