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The Hard Part 

The Hard Part 
They never tell you in teacher school, and it’s rarely discussed elsewhere. It is never, ever portrayed in movies and tv shows about teaching. Teachers rarely bring it up around non-teachers for fear it will make us look weak or inadequate. Valerie Strauss in the Washington Post once put together a series of quotes to answer the question “How hard is teaching?” and asked for more in the comments section. My rant didn’t entirely fit there, so I’m putting it here, because it is on the list of Top Ten Things They Never Tell You in Teacher School. The hard part of teaching is coming to grips with this: There is never enough. There is never enough time. As a teacher, you can see what a perfect job in your classroom would look like. You know all this, but you can also do the math. 110 papers about the view of death in American Romantic writing times 15 minutes to respond with thoughtful written comments equals — wait! Every year you get better. But every day is still educational triage. Related:  KEEPERS

The Hard Part They never tell you in teacher school, and it's rarely discussed elsewhere. It is never, ever portrayed in movies and tv shows about teaching. Teachers rarely bring it up around non-teachers for fear it will make us look weak or inadequate. Valerie Strauss in the Washington Post once put together a series of quotes to answer the question "How hard is teaching?" The hard part of teaching is coming to grips with this: There is never enough. There is never enough time. As a teacher, you can see what a perfect job in your classroom would look like. You know all this, but you can also do the math. 110 papers about the view of death in American Romantic writing times 15 minutes to respond with thoughtful written comments equals -- wait! If you are going to take any control of your professional life, you have to make some hard, conscious decisions. Every year you get better. But every day is still educational triage. Not everybody can deal with this. Here's your metaphor for the day. Trust us.

Simplifying Radicals: Never Give Up, Never Never Give Up, Never Never Never Give Up Never Give Up, Never Never Give Up, Never Never Never Give Up -Winston Churchill These words were and are displayed in the high school where I graduated. I was on the basketball team and before each home game we ran through that hallway to the gym and would jump up to touch those words. Never Give Up! I was a young 17 years old when I graduated from high school, what does a teenager know about hanging in there and not giving up? Many of my students are quick to throw in the towel. I've been showing this short video to my classes and while they watch it I listen to and note their comments: "She should just drive away." After we watch this, I like to make the connection to the classroom. And then may favorite analogy is if she were to give up and drive away without getting any gas: "What would happen if she drove away without getting fuel?" And what if she was too embarrassed to come back?

Church Members Mistreat Homeless Man in Church Unaware It Is Their Pastor in Disguise Pastor Jeremiah Steepek transformed himself into a homeless person and went to the 10,000 member church that he was to be introduced as the head pastor at that morning. He walked around his soon to be church for 30 minutes while it was filling with people for service, only 3 people out of the 7-10,000 people said hello to him. He asked people for change to buy food – no one in the church gave him change. He went into the sanctuary to sit down in the front of the church and was asked by the ushers if he would please sit in the back. He greeted people to be greeted back with stares and dirty looks, with people looking down on him and judging him. As he sat in the back of the church, he listened to the church announcements and such. When all that was done, the elders went up and were excited to introduce the new pastor of the church to the congregation. “We would like to introduce to you Pastor Jeremiah Steepek.” The homeless man sitting in the back stood up and started walking down the aisle.

Deeper Learning: Performance Assessment and Authentic Audience In a conversation with a veteran educator -- a man with years of experience teaching English and acting as a headmaster -- I was confronted with a prejudice so ingrained in my teaching that I was almost embarrassed to admit it. He said, "You know, when I ask a student to write a paper and turn it in to me, that's ridiculous; I'm the worst audience they could have." I was intrigued. He went on, "Who am I to assume that someone will want to write their best work, something truly personal and creative, for me? That hit me like a rolled-up newspaper. As I absorbed this veteran educator’s words, I realized that not only was I wrong in my assumption that I (or any teacher) is a meanigful audience, but also that my assumptions about how grading and assessment work were so far removed from modern research that I might as well have been a 21st-century doctor treating humours. Fortunately, there are many approaches we can take within our own classrooms to change this situation. This matters. 1. 2.

Gregory Project concept envisions billboards to house the homeless The Gregory Project, by DesignDevelop (Image: DesignDevelop) Image Gallery (16 images) Gizmag is no stranger to projects which aim to turn the ubiquitous billboard into something more interesting, including an air-purifying billboard, and an artist's retreat. View all From the renders provided, the interior of the billboard looks small but relatively luxurious, and is split into two rooms. DesignDevelop told Gizmag that, since the billboard homes would be placed close to accommodated areas, there would be the possibility to connect them to local electricity, plumbing and water facilities. The project remains a concept at present, but DesignDevelop envisions that the Slovakian city of Banska Bystrica could see the first rollout of the Gregory Project, and it is hoped that the design could eventually spread worldwide. Sources: Gregory Project, DesignDevelop About the Author Adam is a tech and music writer based in North Wales. Post a CommentRelated Articles

I Lie About My Teaching I liked Devon. We were all first and second-year teachers in that seminar—peers, in theory—but my colleague Devon struck me as a cut above. I’d gripe about a classroom problem, and without judgment or rebuke, he’d outline a thoughtful, inventive solution, as if my blundering incompetence was perhaps a matter of personal taste, and he didn’t wish to impose his own sensibilities. When it fell upon us each to share a four-minute video of our teaching, I looked forward to Devon’s. Instead, the first half of Devon’s four-minute clip showed him fiddling with an overhead projector; in the second half, he was trotting blandly through homework corrections. He looked, in short, like me. Teachers self-promote. But sometimes, the classrooms we describe bear little resemblance to the classrooms where we actually teach, and that gap serves no one. Any honest discussion between teachers must begin with the understanding that each of us mingles the good with the bad. That’s because I made Erin up.

The Inside Of This Billboard Will Astonish You Now here's a good sign. Project Gregory in Slovakia has designed a roadside billboard that doubles as a house for the homeless. According to the project's website, the space is triangular in shape to allow for signage that faces drivers in both directions. There's room enough for a living area with kitchen, desk and bed, plus a bathroom. (Story continues below.) The structure would require "minimal maintenance cost" that could be partially paid through the rental of the advertising platform, the Project Gregory website notes. The concept, also called the Gregory Project by some outlets, was proposed by a man named Gregory who wishes to remain anonymous, Matej Nedorolík of DesignDevelop -- the firm behind the initiative -- said in an email to The Huffington Post. "We would try our best to make it a reality," Nedorolík said on behalf of Gregory. Tell us what you think of the idea in the comments, or tweet us @HuffPostImpact. (Hat tip, AdWeek)

Why Parents Don't Understand How To Help - Why Parents Don’t Understand How To Help by Terry Heick Jargon is a necessary evil. Simply put, jargon helps us be more specific. Pilots in planes don’t ‘go up,’ they ‘gain altitude.’ Forwards in basketball don’t simply “score,” but rather face up the defender to jab step, finishing with an up-and-under move for an ‘and-one.’ Teachers don’t ‘give tests,’ they ‘assess.’ They don’t ‘go over it again,’ they ‘review,’ then ‘remediate.’ A challenge, though, comes after generations of this kind of jargon casually but persistently accruing in and around classrooms and schools. And as education continues to change, this is a chasm that’s only going to deepen. Criticism of jargon abounds, usually beneath the implication that someone is overstating something or sounding haughty, calling a classroom a ‘learning environment,’ or content-to-be-learned a ‘learning target.’ But what we can do is know our audience. This doesn’t mean ‘dumb down’ what we’re saying. 1. 2. 3.

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