background preloader

Women's clothing, men's clothing, contemporary fashion

Women's clothing, men's clothing, contemporary fashion

http://www.whistles.com/

Related:  WHISTLES - Buying & Merchandising

2014-15 YCN Student Awards Design a concept and campaign for the first ever Whistles scent Background Whistles is a leading British contemporary fashion brand that encapsulates an intelligent sense of design with timeless and luxurious pieces. Our collections are modern and laid back with an attention to detail and quality. Since its relaunch in 2008, and under the guidance of inspiring CEO, Jane Shepherdson, Whistles has become a wardrobe staple for fashion editors and industry leaders, characterised by its contemporary and effortless style. In September 2014, Whistles launched its hotly anticipated debut men’s collection. chloe Fall 2016 captures an evocative mix of innocence and sensuality, where the spirit of Balthus’ paintings and Carlo Mollino’s Polaroid girls meets the grunge attitude of a young Björk. The See by Chloé gang unite within this collection, remixing a flirty touch of ‘flou’ with utility shapes in rich, unexpected textures. Checks, stripes, and animalia prints clash against jacquards, denim, and lace – with a layered look that pair voluminous outerwear with relaxed separates. This season’s autumnal colour palette and baroque details, of delicate smocking, needlepoint lace, and tiered ruffles of crepe and cotton, counterbalance the tomboy style of wide-leg patch pocket trousers, henley t-shirts, must-have knits and workwear jackets in corduroy, indigo denim, and leather. Top S6AJH16 S6A080 SDA DARK NIGHT Pants S6AJP04 S6A089 SC6 INK Bracelet 9K7358 P212 001 BLACK Boots SB27025 4002 I770 LAPIS

Whistles has teamed up with Edwin on the jeans you need right now After only one year on the style scene, Whistles' menswear line has not only established itself as a GQ go-to for sleek staples, but also for its curveball collaborations. Having got together with British illustrator Joe Cruz, Swedish outerwear makers Stutterheim and American baseball kit crafters Ebbets Field Flannels over the past 12 months, the label has now teamed up with Japanese selvedge masters Edwin to craft a limited edition pair of jeans. Whistles conquers the 'middle market' of British womenswear While Marks & Spencer announced a 6.8% drop of general sales last month, another corner of the British high street has been quietly flourishing. Whistles, the clothing brand set up by Lucille Lewin in the 1980s, announced this week that it had bought back the majority of its shares from the Icelandic government, a move which has underlined its growing strength. Whistles, which has been independent since parting ways with the retail group Mosaic in 2008, has gone from strength to strength despite a tough economic climate. Sales were up 13% in 2011 and there was "consistent double digit like for like sales growth," this year, according to a company statement.

Holiday The holidays aren’t called the most wonderful time of year for nothing. It’s old friends, new acquaintances, thoughtful gestures,and off-the-cuff shindigs. Live it up—that’s what we’re doing.(It’s how we holiday.) #warbyholiday Best. Sales are up...yet there's still a blow for fashion retailer Whistles as it falls into the red By Sarah Bridge for The Mail on Sunday Published: 21:16 GMT, 14 November 2015 | Updated: 21:16 GMT, 14 November 2015 Whistles, the high street store whose clothes are worn by the Duchess of Cambridge, increased sales by 11 per cent to £62.9million last year as it successfully launched into the menswear market and expanded its number of shops.

Jane Shepherdson Chief Executive at Whistles, Jane Shepherdson is the figurehead of our brand. Originally from Bristol, she studied in London and worked as Brand Director at Topshop. With an uncanny ability to know what women want to wear, she has been working her magic at Whistles since 2008. HIGH - High Casual Everyday Couture by Claire Campbell The HIGH website is owned by Interfashion SpA and managed by Triboo Digitale S.r.l.Interfashion SpA and Triboo Digitale give fundamental importance to the privacy of their Users. All data provided by those visiting the Site will be processed paying maximum attention and taking all necessary precautions to guarantee their safety, in full compliance with the Italian Personal Data Protection Code rules and regulations. Informative Note pursuant to Art. 13 of L.D. 196 dated June 30th 2003 - Personal Data Protection Code.

Jane Shepherdson, Chief Executive Officer, Whistles LONDON, United Kingdom — Perhaps it’s not surprising that, in her spare time, Jane Shepherdson does flying trapeze in Hoxton, smack in the heart of achingly hip East London. Right from her earliest days in the fashion industry, Shepherdson has been known for taking risks and having her finger on the pulse of what’s cool. After getting her start as an assistant buyer at Topshop, back in 1984, Shepherdson spent twenty years working her way up the ladder to become Topshop’s brand director, effectively overseeing the retail, product, finance, HR and property departments of a company that, under her leadership, was transformed into a globally recognised brand, emblematic of the dynamic nature of British high street fashion.

Whistles' move into menswear: what does it mean for men's fashion? The news that Whistles is moving into menswear is enough to put spring in one's step – whatever your gender. The high-street brand has come to be treasured by women who love smart, useful (but never boring) clothes that appeal to minimalist sensibilities while keeping fun on the agenda . That's a brand DNA that hits the ground running in menswear. While no images have been released as yet, you imagine these pieces will sit next to those inclined to Cos and – when they're feeling flush – Lanvin, Raf Simons or a printed sweatshirt from Givenchy. The introduction of menswear comes on the back of more excellent financial results for the growing brand.

The rise of the high-end street: Zara, Whistles and Cos pioneer a new age for our high-street Like Countryfile and a £1.30 sandwich from dear old M&S (you know the one), the lure of the great British high street is its delicious familiarity. As shoppers with depleted bank balances dancing in our eyes, we head to our favourite multi-faceted fashion mecca to buy the clothes we love at the prices we expect. Surprises — pleasant or otherwise — are few and far between. But change is afoot. Look hard at the rails of Zara and you’ll find that all is not as it seems. While the Spanish-born store has long held its gaze on fashion that is both timely and yours for less than £150, Zara is dipping its toe into the luxury market by including a few carefully chosen high-end pieces.

Creatures of the Wind SS15 Initial reaction: A road trip across the USA culminates in a luxurious wedding in Palm Springs: lush beading on cotton with messy post-car hair and airy silhouettes. Atmospheric inspiration: Why it’s time fashion ditched its ‘tribal’ inspirations On Tuesday, Valentino caused controversy with a show inspired by “wild, tribal Africa” that featured a cast of largely white models wearing bone necklaces and cornrow hairstyles, hitting the runway to the sound of bongos. “Please tell me that there are African Americans modeling in Valentino’s African line,” wrote one Twitter user, pointing out the questionable decision of choosing a line up of fair-skinned girls for a collection supposed to embody “modern day African grace” (only 8 of the show’s almost 90 looks were given to models of colour). With cultural appropriation being one of this year’s biggest talking points – thanks to the likes of Amandla Stenberg, the Dazed cover star and Hunger Games actress who went viral with a video entitled Don't Cash Crop My Cornrows, it seemed a risky move, even if done out of cluelessness rather than malice. Of course, Valentino are far from the first fashion house to get inspired by Africa.

Alexandre Herchcovitch Store - Tokyo Alexandre Herchcovitch has come a long way since his humble beginnings of making his mother's party clothes. Having launched his first collection in 1994, things have only gotten bigger for the Brazilian-born designer. Trained at the Catholic institution Santa Marcelina College of Arts in Sao Paulo, his designs have been sent down the runways of New York, Paris and London. Best known for avant-garde designs and eclectic prints, his trademark skulls became an icon of Brazilian youth in the nineties. 2007 was a memorable year for Herchcovitch. It was a year of branching out, particularly with his redesign of the uniform for McDonald's employees in Brazil, and the opening of his first store abroad.

Related: