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Gesso

Gesso
©2004 - 2006 by Aisling D'Art Gesso is a useful option for art journaling. It's also used for painting and mixed media art. I use gesso often. Here's what gesso is and tips for how you can use it. Gesso can go under paint or heavy collage or embellishments, to make your journal pages stronger. Gesso is a primer. Originally, gesso only came in white. Gesso makes the surface a little stiffer. Today, gesso comes in many colors. It's useful for mixed media work as well as fine art paintings. Gesso is different from paint. Originally, gesso was a mixture of calcium--like chalk--in a thin base of animal glue. When you see religious paintings and icons on wood, they were probably painted over gesso. But, gesso changed in the 20th century. In recent years, some artists have begun to question whether or not acrylic gesso is the right product to use under oil paint. As many of us began to create art journals, we found new uses for acrylic gesso. It's easy to use gesso. For color, I've had luck with: Related:  ekroberts00Art and DIYACTIVIDADES

Watercolor Cards If you have been loving the watercolor and ombre trend recently, you are going to LOVE this amazing DIY Sarah is bringing us today! She is sharing a sweet way to ask your bridesmaids if they will stand by your side on your wedding day. This DIY is so adorable and super easy! It is even more awesome because this technique can be applied to so many elements in your wedding (hello, fabulous escort cards and favor tags!) It’s DIY time again, lovely readers! This time I have a super “artsy” project for you! Materials Watercolor paper cut into 9″x6.25″ rectangles, folded into cards(size A6: 4.5″x6.25″), 1 per bridesmaidWatercolor paints (the cheap Crayola one will work just fine!) Helpful hints: Using a bone folder to fold the paper is very helpful, since watercolor paper tends to be thicker than printer or scrapbooking paper. Step 1: Cut all of the paper (watercolor and scrapbook) to the sizes indicated above. Share:

Spectacular Moleskine Doodles Explode with Energy - My Modern Met Philippines-based illustrator Kerby Rosanes proves that doodling can be so much more than scratching unintelligible scribbles on paper. Through his Sketchy Stories blog, Rosanes shares his wonderful world of doodling in a simple Moleskine sketchbook. Equipped with an ordinary Moleskine, a few Uni Pin drawing pens, and his innate gift for drawing, the artist is able to transport viewers to a world where tiny, cartoonish creatures explode with gusto to make up larger entities. Each of the illustrator's complex and crowded sketches are filled with minute details that allow the eye to wander and discover new characters and designs at every turn. Kerby Rosanes websiteKerby Rosanes on deviantART via [Gaks]

Watercolour Pencils Would ya look at that? I'm blogging at night. That's weird. Usually, I like to get-my-blog-on in the morning. BUT. Short-and-sweet-disclaimer: I do not claim to be an expert, a teacher, or an art prodigy when it comes to any of these tiplets or media. So, in the true spirit of CREATING and letting go and being loose - leave your mark. Okay. Let's get a little wishy-washy. You need a few things to get started here. The Watercolour Pencils. Alright - rip a page out of your sketchbook (you don't have to!) Throw down some colours. Spray it. NOTE from COMMENTS: I just let it air dry. Look at how beautiful that is. This is a scan of the finished product. A couple of months back I put out an ALL-CALL for starfish... and I got about 35 starfish photos in less that 24 hours. Alright. Have a beautiful night.

Sandpaper Surface & Colour Pencils The kinds of surfaces suitable for colored pencil are nearly endless. If a surface will accept dry media of any kind, it will work for colored pencil, often with a minimum of preparation. The paper Today’s demonstration was created on UART premium pastel paper. According to the UART website, their paper is pH neutral and acid free, both of which make it an ideal support for artwork. For today’s project with colored pencils, I chose the finest tooth available: 800 grit. The format I conduct most experiments on a small scale. My process The first thing I found in working with sandpaper is that it’s not imperative to keep pencils needle-sharp. While the resulting jagged pencil tip is unlikely to damage UART pastel paper, breakage is a nuisance, so instead of sharpening often, I used my colored pencils almost like pastels: blunt, with medium to heavy pressure and firm strokes. The good news was that the paper took a lot of color from start to finish. Final thoughts

Art Journal Every Day Q: How can I find all the previous Art Journal Every Day posts? A: Find them all listed by category and linked here. Q: What is Art Journal Every Day? A: Art Journal Every Day is weekly feature on this blog. It appears every Friday. The Art Journal Every Day (AJED) posts are always art journal focused, though not necessarily focused on daily art journaling. Q: What does the title "Art Journal Every Day" mean? A: I do my best to art journal every day. Q: How can I participate? A: Lots of different ways! There is a free flickr group here for sharing photos of your pages. Also, you can grab this button... ...for your blog by copying the text in the box and pasting it into your sidebar. Q: What if I've never art journaled before? A: Jump right in! Q: What supplies do I need to get started? A: You don't "need" anything.

How to Make Clothing Buttons from Shrink Plastic… | scissors.paper.wok - StumbleUpon This tutorial is an old one of mine that’s too good not to share again. Since posting the first time, I’ve had lots of questions about these buttons which will hopefully be answered in this revised post. Equipment Some handy notes: 1. single hole, hole punch (like this one here). 2. 3. Okay.. lets get started! Tracing tips: You can use either coloured pencils or permanent pens. Words must be writted backwards in order to be readable. Shrinking the buttons: To shrink the buttons, you can use an oven or a heat gun (the kind used for embellishing). After the buttons have twisted and twirled, and are LYING FLAT, it’s time to take them out. Note: If the skrinking is taking too long, you may need to turn your oven up. Here’s a short little stop-motion to make sure you’ve got the gist of how easy this is! Shrink Paper {here} Circle Punch {here} Hole punch {here} Pens {here} Update: I’ve made a video to show how to shrink the buttons using a craft embellishment heat gun. Kimanh Hi my name's Kimanh.

How to Blend Colored Pencil Drawings with Rubbing Alcohol Rubbing alcohol is a great solvent for colored pencils. It breaks down the wax binder in most colored pencils and allows the pigments to blend more like paint. It’s also wonderful for restoring the paper’s tooth. I use rubbing alcohol in three main ways: 1. Light blending can be used in a variety of situations. I also use rubbing alcohol to create a more saturated color field. Color can also be pulled into an adjoining area by wetting the layers of color and dragging or drawing it into areas of blank paper. For any of these methods, use a cotton swab or cotton ball. Cotton balls are bigger, so they are great for larger areas. The only thing to watch for with either cotton swabs or cotton balls is migrating color. In the image above, you see the difference between blending with rubbing alcohol (bottom half) and no blending (top half). On the left side, you can see how I was able to tint bare paper by dragging color out of the colored block. Take care in using this method to tint paper.

Quickposes: pose generator for figure & gesture drawing practice 15 DIY crafts you need to make right now It's cold, it's raining and quite frankly, it's utterly miserable outside at the moment. So stay in! But then it hits you. It's not that great inside either. You're young, so you haven't got all of that furniture and all of the little decorative trinkets that accumulate over time, and if you have, you haven't got nearly enough. Instead of spending your time sitting around moaning about the weather, why not spend your time doing something useful? Why not spend your time crafting some of these? Freshers Fields is back for 2013! 1. Source Stick your button collection around a balloon (and importantly) to each other. 2. Source Glue, buttons, cardboard and a bit of artistic ingenuity and you'll have yourself a great sign for your bedroom door (assuming you use the first letter of your first name). 3. Simply wash out a screw top spirit bottle, find a screw top soap dispenser and put it together. 4. Source Blank glass tumblers, paint, and cotton wool buds are all you need for this one. 5. 6. Source 7.

Homemade Glitter Homemade shimmery glitter is probably the easiest thing you can make and really pretty to look at. Plus, this version is edible and nontoxic for crafting. Supplies: table salt, food coloring and a tupperware container to mix in. A little silver dust used in decorating cakes adds some shimmer-if you’re a shimmer kind of girl-but it’s not completely necessary. Pour some salt into the tubberware. Isn’t it pretty?

Online Drawing Lessons - Learn to Draw Online for Free 100 Ways to Repurpose Everything (Mega Roundup!) Think this title is a tall order? Well, you’re in for a post of epic eco-tastic proportions. So epic that you may need to give your computer or mobile device an extra moment to load all of our pretty pictures. Seeing as we love to repurpose just about anything under the sun, we’re celebrating Earth Day by serving up 100 of our favorite ways to upcycle, reuse, and transform everyday materials into creative new things to wear, hang on the wall, and give to friends. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61.

The Kathryn Wheel

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