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Coppicing - A Lost Art Revisited - Verge Permaculture

Coppicing - A Lost Art Revisited - Verge Permaculture
Coppicing has always been interesting to me as a wood production system (fuel, timber) because it uses trees that can be cut perpetually. In other words, the tree is cut and grows back. This is quite different from the type of forestry we practice here in Canada with spruce, fir, and pine trees. These conifers are cut once and then die. As mentioned in my wood gasification article, if we all moved over to burning wood for heat and power, we would deforest the planet in a matter of years. Setting up these types of systems within our cities and farms would be a way of preventing this as well as providing bee fodder, bird habitat and windbreaks. Here is a great Wikipedia definition on coppicing: In Canada we can grow a number of different trees that can be cut and grow back. Here is a great video on Coppicing from Britain. In addition to fuel and timber coppice systems can be used for basketry, propagation, mulch and fodder.

http://vergepermaculture.ca/blog/2014/03/31/coppicing/

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22 trees that can be tapped for sap and syrup As winter wanes and spring approaches, wild foodists all across North America tap into the time-honored tradition of sugar production – mainly, the transformation of maple tree sap into maple syrup and sugar. This process, passed on from the Native Americans to the early settlers, is still quite popular today, and is responsible for one of the few wild foods that can be purchased commercially in most supermarkets. Most people associate syrup with the maple tree, and although much of today’s syrup does originate from the sugar maple, all species of maple can be tapped. Even better, many other trees from other genera can be tapped to extract sap, which ultimately can be turned into delicious syrup.

How to make a bamboo polytunnel We used a local renewable material, caña (like bamboo). You could use anything long and bendy – we would like to try it with hazel next time we are further north. The only items we paid for are the plastic and string (pita string made from fibres of the giant succulent Agave plant). Books on Growing Healthy Fruit: Holistic Orchard Network with Michael Phillips Retail Price $49.95 Network Special $40 Running Time 5 hours Every farm and homestead can enjoy the timeless pleasure of a fruit orchard. You do this by emphasizing biological health and diversity -- from the microscopic fungi in the soil to the beneficial insects, companion plants, and wildlife that together form a complete and living orchard ecosystem. Michael Phillips shows how in this 'dvd walk' through the orchard year. See basic horticultural skills demonstrated, from grafting and tree planting to the right mulch and pest management.

Recycling animal and human dung is the key to sustainable farming © Illustrations in red & black: Diego Marmolejo for low-tech magazine. The innocent looking water closet breaks up a natural cycle in our food supply. Basically, it turns extremely valuable resources into waste products. When we grow crops, we withdraw essential nutrients from the soil: potassium, nitrogen and phosphate, to name but the most important. During the greater part of human history, we recycled these nutrients through our bodies and returned them to the soil, via excreta, food trimmings and the burial of dead. Today, we flush them mostly into the sea (see the infographic below, source).

DIY $2 self-watering garden bed - Grow produce easily, even in the toughest drought conditions - NaturalNews.com Thursday, June 26, 2014 by: Carolanne WrightTags: self-watering garden bed, sustainable agriculture, drought conditions (NaturalNews) "When life gives you lemons, share them with neighbors!" enthuses the Food is Free Project, a grassroots organization based out of Austin, Texas. The project isn't advocating sharing bad luck; instead, it's championing the idea of connecting neighbors and communities with a bounty of free, homegrown fresh produce. It all began as a single, front yard organic vegetable garden with a sign explaining that the food was free for the taking. The sign also included contact information for those who wanted to learn more about growing food in a simple manner.

Fukuoka's Food Forest Mandarin orange, a main crop of Fukuoka’s food forest. At one time he was shipping an impressive 90 tons of citrus fruit annually Many of us in the permaculture and organic movements have read Japanese farmer Masanobu Fukuoka’s One Straw Revolution, which lays out his ingenious (though hard to replicate) no-till organic rice production system. I was surprised and pleased when, in my job as librarian for the New England Small Farm Institute in the late 1990s, I stumbled on his Natural Way of Farming, a translation of his 1976 book Shizen Noho. At that time he had already been running his orchard as an organic polyculture food forest for over three decades — since the 1940s! Natural Way of Farming offers much detail about Fukuoka’s methods of grain, vegetable, and fruit production.

The Latest Clean Energy Cocktail: Bacteria And Fungus By Jeff Spross "The Latest Clean Energy Cocktail: Bacteria And Fungus" By throwing together a common fungus and a common bacterium, researchers are producing isobutanol — a biofuel that gallon-for-gallon delivers 82 percent of gasoline’s heat energy. The more common ethanol, by contrast, only gets 67 percent of gasoline’s energy, and does more damage to pipelines and engines. And the University of Michigan research team did it using stalks and leaves from corn plants as the raw material.

A Best-Practices Guide to Growing Tomatoes: Tomato Basics Attention to the basic needs of tomatoes goes a long way toward keeping them healthy and productive. If you’ve had problems with tomatoes in the past, the solution is probably in this list. Light. Plant tomatoes where they get 8 hours or more of sunlight daily. Can you Restore Land and Produce Food in the Same Place? Five Ways to Help the Natural World by Growing Food We are going to continue to restore the land at Whaelghinbran Farm by growing more food there. We are going to think carefully about how, when, where and why we grow food so that our food system will benefit many of the wild plants and animals that are losing places to live and prosper in New Brunswick.

Are Coffee Grounds Good For Plants? You only need to walk past a coffee shop in any American city to see that our country loves java. With so much coffee being consumed on a daily basis, it’s encouraging to learn that there is a productive use for all those grinds. Next time you make a cup, save your coffee grounds and add them to the soil in your garden. 10 Incredible Uses for Epsom Salt in the Garden Love gardening? Then you’ll love our brand new Kindle book: 605 Secrets For A Beautiful, Bountiful Organic Garden: Insider Secrets From A Gardening Superstar. Epsom salt is comprised of hydrated magnesium sulfate, a naturally occurring mineral first found in the well waters of Epsom, England. Regenerative Enterprise Sustainable is not enough. AppleSeed designer Ethan Roland takes permaculture to the next level with his recent book Regenerative Enterprise: Optimizing for Multi-Capital Abundance. The book begins by exploring the revolutionary 8 Forms of Capital economic framework: The book defines degeneration and regeneration, explores the role of social entrepreneurship in ecological restoration, and offers clear principles for the development of innovative enterprise ecologies.

100 years ago, people were eating things that most of us will never taste. So what happened? Narrator: In 1905, a book called The Apples of New York appeared. It featured hundreds of Apples with names like Westfield Seek-No-Further or Esopus Spitzenburg, a favorite of Thomas Jefferson. If it wasn't for preservationists for like Ron Joyner in Lansing, North Carolina‎, most apples including the Virginia Greening, an apple dating back to the 1700 with thick green skin and yellow, coarse, and sweet flesh would no longer exist. It isn't just apples. How to Grow an Endless Supply of Garlic Indoors Other than being one of the healthiest food out there, garlic is also easy to be grown indoors. It is also a much cheaper way than buying it at the grocery store, and of course much healthier. You’ve all heard of the amazing benefits of garlic and all the things it can do for your body, so let’s just jump to how to grow it in the comfort of your own home. How to Grow Garlic Indoors Things You Will Need A head of garlic Potting soil A container

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