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Conditions in Trenches - Dan Snow's Battle of the Somme

Conditions in Trenches - Dan Snow's Battle of the Somme

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FvYIIuxh2kY

Related:  historiaICT and History

TAAPWorld - The Environmental Impact of the Industrial Revolution The Industrial Revolution changed the relationship between humans and their environment. Human development, public health, energy usage and sanitation all felt the effects of the advances made as a result of the Industrial Revolution. Beginning with the replacement of machinery for manual labor in the mid 1700s in Great Britain, fossil fuels replaced natural energy sources such as wind, water, and wood to produce mainly textiles and develop iron. The processes that were developed during this time period remarkably changed not only production capabilities, but also the lifestyles of the people.

3D Historical Virtual Tour ​World War I Trench - 1917 ​​​​This World War I Trench scene illustrates some of the conditions soldiers of the Great War used to face from 1914 to 1918. In many cases, the front line hardly moved at all over the course of the war. In areas where fighting had been severe, it was not uncommon for many bodies to decay between the lines in No Man's Land. The stench of the front lines would greet soldiers on their way to the trenches miles before they ever got there. Rats, lice and disease were rampant among the trenches.

Year 6 SATs Literacy Revision - KS2 Literacy Boot Camp is a series of activities to aid year 6 SATs. It can be carried out in class with your teacher, or on your own at home: Read instructions. The first 6 days of Literacy Boot Camp are free. Read more, FAQs and subscribe. Sutton Hoo On a small hill above the river Deben in Suffolk is a strange-looking field, covered with grassy mounds of different sizes. For several hundred years what lay under them was a mystery. Then in 1938, an archaeologist called Basil Brown started digging under mounds 2, 3 and 4, where he found a few, mostly broken, Anglo-Saxon objects which had been buried alongside their owner's bodies. Sadly, grave robbers had taken most of what was there. Starter Of The Day Start your Mathematics Lesson with our Starter Of The Day. Boost your mind power with these brain exercises. Give your mental ability a work out with a range of mathematical puzzles, speed tests and creative ideas. Click on the date in the calendar below for the Starter Of The Day. The Starter for the 9th April is the ultimate customisable revision lesson Starter.

Course: Interactive History The Stone Age Archeological prehistory,is commonly divided chronologically into distinct periods, based on the development of tools from stone to bronze and iron, as well as changes in culture and climate that can be determined from the archeological record; but the boundaries of these periods are uncertain, and the changes between them gradual. The earliest inhabitants of Britain for whom there is compelling evidence are bands of hunters living in Southern and Western England during the Hoxnian interglacial (about 380,000 to 400,000 BC). (Some very recent excavations of stone tools on the East Anglian coastline suggest human presence as early as 700,000 years ago). However, as temperatures again dropped, Britain was abandoned.

Word Clouds for Kids! ABCya is the leader in free educational computer games and mobile apps for kids. The innovation of a grade school teacher, ABCya is an award-winning destination for elementary students that offers hundreds of fun, engaging learning activities. Millions of kids, parents, and teachers visit ABCya.com each month, playing over 1 billion games last year. Apple, The New York Times, USA Today, Parents Magazine and Scholastic, to name just a few, have featured ABCya’s popular educational games. British WW1 Medals Hundreds of thousands of men who served with the armed services, some women and some civilians received at least one WW1 medal. There are two main kinds of WW1 medal awards: campaign medals and gallantry or meritorious service awards. Campaign Medals A Campaign or a War Medal was awarded to an individual if he or she took part in a military campaign outside of the United Kingdom in a Theatre of War or in a time of war.

The Earth and Beyond Welcome to The Earth and Beyond Hello, my name is Tim O'Brien. I'm an astronomer working at The University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory. As an astronomer my job is to try and understand how the universe works and my main interest is why some stars explode - more about this later! I also get to visit lots of schools and share amazing facts with children and teachers about the Sun, Earth and Moon, the stars and planets, and the Universe as we know it!

British First World War propaganda posters Designed by Arthur Wardle and published by the Parliamentary Recruitment Committee in 1915, this poster demonstrates that the recruitment drive during the First World War was not limited to British citizens. It attempts to foster a sense of unity between the dominions of the British Empire against a common enemy. At the outbreak of the First World War on 4 August 1914 the entirety of the British Empire was automatically deemed to be at war with Germany. However, self-governing dominions such as Canada, India, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand could choose whether or not to offer military assistance. A later version of the poster simply read "Overseas States" where before India, Canada, Australia and New Zealand were listed; South Africa had initially hesitated to become involved in the conflict and was left out of Wardle's original design.

Causes of World War I Germany, France, Russia, Austria-Hungary, and Britain attempting to keep the lid on the simmering cauldron of imperialist and nationalist tensions in the Balkans to prevent a general European war. They were successful in 1912 and 1913, but did not succeed in 1914. The crisis came after a long and difficult series of diplomatic clashes between the Great Powers (Italy, France, Germany, Britain, Austria-Hungary and Russia) over European and colonial issues in the decade before 1914 that had left tensions high. In turn these diplomatic clashes can be traced to changes in the balance of power in Europe since 1867.[2] The more immediate cause for the war was tensions over territory in the Balkans. Austria-Hungary competed with Serbia and Russia for territory and influence in the region and they pulled the rest of the Great Powers into the conflict through their various alliances and treaties. Background

Collection search Registration numbers The most common type of Museum number begins with the year of acquisition. The database standardises these numbers in the form, for example: 1887,0708.2427 (year: comma: block of four numbers - usually representing a month and day: full-stop and final number). The final number can be of any length and may be followed by another full-stop and a sub-number. In some cases the same number is shared by two or more objects across departments. In some of these cases a prefix has been added before a number (e.g. World War I World War I (WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, or the Great War, was a global war centred in Europe that began on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918. More than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, were mobilised in one of the largest wars in history. Over 9 million combatants and 7 million civilians died as a result of the war (including the victims of a number of genocides), a casualty rate exacerbated by the belligerents' technological and industrial sophistication, and the tactical stalemate caused by trench warfare, a grueling form of warfare in which the defender held the advantage. It was one of the deadliest conflicts in history, and paved the way for major political changes, including revolutions in many of the nations involved. The trigger for the war was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary, by Yugoslav nationalist Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914.

Stone Age teaching resources from the UK’s museums © Creswell Crags Stone Age teaching resources from the UK’s museumsA virtual Stone Age We love Virtually The Ice Age, the online learning resource from Creswell Crags (see photo above), where pupils can discover more about the Stone Age, including: Stone Age people, archaeology and excavation techniques, and the natural world. Don’t miss Could You have Survived The Ice Age? section with a quiz and more info about Stone Age art, camp sites and the tools Stone Age people used. Great images used too. More photos of Stone Age objectsExplore more Stone Age objects in the British Museum’s online collection.

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