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30 Magical Photos Of Children Playing Around The World

30 Magical Photos Of Children Playing Around The World
No matter their cultural background, no matter their economic situation, kids will always find imaginative ways to have fun. Their wild imaginations and magical childhood moments, when captured on camera by talented photographers, can make for truly wonderful photos. These 33 images we collected will prove that childhood can be wonderful no matter where you go. Show Full Text Many in the Western world fear that technology is making today’s children lose touch with nature and with their own creativity, and while there are arguments to be made for the intellectual stimulation that apps and programs for children can bring, there’s also something to be said for simply playing with a stick in the mud or chasing dandelion seeds though an open meadow. For better or worse, the children in these photos seem entirely content making their own fun. Indonesia Thanks for sharing! 3x per week 30,000,000+ monthly readers Error sending email Image credits: Ipoenk Graphic Image credits: Agoes Antara Russia Peru

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State of play: school playgrounds from Kenya to Japan Paso Payita schoolAramasi, Chuquisaca, Bolivia, photographed 9 August 2011 Situated in a remote area on rough terrain 3,000m above sea level, the school has two teachers and 31 students aged from six to 12 years. Many students have to walk several miles to school.

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