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Information literacy

Information literacy
The United States National Forum on Information Literacy defines information literacy as " ... the ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively use that information for the issue or problem at hand."[1][2] Other definitions incorporate aspects of "skepticism, judgement, free thinking, questioning, and understanding... A number of efforts have been made to better define the concept and its relationship to other skills and forms of literacy. History of the concept[edit] The phrase information literacy first appeared in print in a 1974 report by Paul G. The Presidential Committee on Information Literacy released a report on January 10, 1989, outlining the importance of information literacy, opportunities to develop information literacy, and an Information Age School. The Alexandria Proclamation linked Information literacy with lifelong learning. On May 28, 2009, U.S. Presidential Committee on Information Literacy[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_literacy

Related:  Data 2 Wisdom - D.I.K.Wknowledge management

Birth of a Meme: The Rise of Culture Tech I’ve been tracking emerging trends for a while now, exploring the co-evolution of humanity and our technologies, and building visions of the kinds of futures I’d like to see. Lately, I’ve found myself a bit restless, wondering “what’s next?” The conferences and gatherings I’m attending are beginning to feel stale, the conversations needing new framings and lenses through which to look at our world and ourselves. I’ve been on the hunt for a word or phrase that can encompass the essence of what feels important and resonates with me right now. The search has been prompted by my decision to start a new project — writing my first book. (yay!)

Dealing with the problems The Daily Motivator - www.GreatDay.com Friday, September 13, 2013 The more you learn from your problems, the more effective you become at dealing with them. Sociology of knowledge The sociology of knowledge is the study of the relationship between human thought and the social context within which it arises, and of the effects prevailing ideas have on societies. It is not a specialized area of sociology but instead deals with broad fundamental questions about the extent and limits of social influences on individual's lives and the social-cultural basics of our knowledge about the world.[1] Complementary to the sociology of knowledge is the sociology of ignorance[2] including the study of nescience, ignorance, knowledge gaps or non-knowledge as inherent features of knowledge making.[3] [4] [5] The sociology of knowledge was pioneered primarily by the sociologists Émile Durkheim and Marcel Mauss at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries. Their works deal directly with how conceptual thought, language, and logic could be influenced by the sociological milieu out of which they arise. Schools[edit] Émile Durkheim[edit]

Community of practice and trust building - ... a beginner at something A few days ago I shared my crude model how we go from words to trust. I strung it along: word, definition, context, grammar, meaning, concept, understanding, salience, insight, trust, reputation. I believe each prior step must be present and perceived by both partners in an interaction before the next step gets good traction. The best course I ever did, and 11 Top Tips for creative teaching Over the next few days we will be sharing the winning three stories in our Transition Training competition of courses people did that changed their lives. I thought it might be a good idea to start with my story of the course that impacted me the most in my life so far. In June 2001, I got off the bus in a small village in Lancashire, with a rather heavy bag and in somewhat inclement weather, to walk up the hill to Middlewood, a permaculture project set atop a hill in beautiful woodland. The walk was considerably longer than I had anticipated, the road, seemingly to nowhere, seemed to stretch on for miles. Eventually I made it there in a somewhat sweaty blather, and found my bunk in the Study Centre, a beautiful building clad in timber from the site, graced, at its heart, by the first masonry stove I had ever seen (see right). The reason for my trek was to do a course called Teaching Permaculture Creatively, led by Rod Everett.

Knowledge ecosystem The idea of a knowledge ecosystem is an approach to knowledge management which claims to foster the dynamic evolution of knowledge interactions between entities to improve decision-making and innovation through improved evolutionary networks of collaboration.[1][2] In contrast to purely directive management efforts that attempt either to manage or direct outcomes, knowledge ecosystems espouse that knowledge strategies should focus more on enabling self-organization in response to changing environments.[3] The suitability between knowledge and problems confronted defines the degree of "fitness" of a knowledge ecosystem. Articles discussing such ecological approaches typically incorporate elements of complex adaptive systems theory. Known implementation considerations of knowledge ecosystem include the Canadian Government.[4]

1. The DIKW Model of Innovation Data simply exists. It gains context to become Information by human interaction, which itself becomes Knowledge by interconversion of different forms of information. Wisdom comes from repetition of the DIK cycle. Where does knowledge come from? In most of the training courses I run, I ask the question "where does knowledge come from?" Always, every time, I get the answer "Experience - Knowledge comes from Experience". Never does anyone answer "Knowledge comes from Information".

Outline of knowledge Outline of knowledge From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Not to be confused with the Propædia volume of the Encyclopædia Britannica, part of which is titled Outline of Knowledge. The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to knowledge: Knowledge – familiarity with someone or something, which can include facts, information, descriptions, and/or skills acquired through experience or education.

Wired West vol. 5 no. 4 - Competitive Intelligence: What to Do with the Data Roger Hough, Lowell Professional Services Introduction This article is a summary of a presentation given to a joint meeting of the Special Libraries' Association and the Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals (SCIP) in Calgary on 16th May 2002. Competitive intelligence increasingly requires access to and the processing of large quantities of data. Time for knowledge and wisdom “I never have the time”. “The internet’s just providing too much information these days”. “No-one ever knows where to start with all this information”. Common symptoms of the Non-Believer, enough to stop him or her ever starting their own blog, podcast or del.icio.us bookmarking site. But there is some truth in what these detractors say. The internet could be seen as becoming a victim of its own success by providing a means for the masses to not only seek information but, in the past few years, to provide their own versions and interpretations of information in real time and at the click of a mouse.

Portal:Epistemology According to Plato, knowledge is a subset of that which is both true and believed Epistemology or theory of knowledge is the branch of philosophy that studies the nature, methods, limitations, and validity of knowledge and belief. The term "epistemology" is based on the Greek words "επιστήμη or episteme" (knowledge or science) and "λόγος or logos" (account/explanation). It was introduced into English by the Scottish philosopher James Frederick Ferrier (1808-1864).[1] Much of the debate in this field has focused on analyzing the nature of knowledge and how it relates to similar notions such as truth, belief, and justification.

Manage Your Data: Data Management: Subject Guides The MIT Libraries supports the MIT community in the management and curation of research data by providing the following services: Data Management Guide This Data Management and Publishing Guide is a practical self-help guide to the management and curation of research data throughout its life cycle. It provides guidance on a range of topics, including: planning for data management, documentation/metadata, file formats, data organization, data security and backup, citing data, data integration, funder requirements, ethical and legal issues, and sharing and archiving data. Assistance with Creating Data Management Plans Many funders, such as the National Science Foundation, have requirements for data sharing and data management plans.

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