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What’s on your mind?

What’s on your mind?
This EFL lesson is designed around a short film by Shaun Higton and the theme of Facebook. Students practise vocabulary related to social media, watch a short film, and talk about Facebook. I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free. Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2) Learner type:Teens and adults Time: 60 minutes Activity: Vocabulary work, watching a short film, and speaking Topic: Facebook Language: Vocabulary related to social media. Materials: Short film, vocabulary worksheet and discussion questions Downloadable materials: what’s on your mind lesson instructions social media vocabulary social media discussion questions Support Film English Film English remains ad-free and takes many hours a month to research and write, and hundreds of dollars to sustain. Step 1 Give the students the social media vocabulary worksheet. Step 2 Step 3 Step 4

http://film-english.com/2014/06/30/whats-on-your-mind/

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The Best Popular Movies/TV Shows For ESL/EFL (& How To Use Them) You might want to see our book excerpt, Eight Ways to Use Video With English Language Learners I’ve written a guest post for Edutopia titled 5-Minute Film Festival: 8 Videos for ELL Classrooms. Check Out my related New York Times post The Best Fun Videos For English Language Learners In 2015 – So Far Look Up This EFL lesson is designed around a short film and poem by Gary Turk and the theme of isolation caused by the use of new technology. Students watch a short film with no sound and speculate about the story it tells, read a poem and discuss digital technology, social media and isolation. I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free. Language level: Upper Intermediate (B2) – Advanced (C1)

The Seven Best Silent Short Films for Language Teaching - Kieran Donaghy As many short films are artistic, they have limited appeal in the commercial marketplace and are funded from diverse sources. To make them easier to sell worldwide, they often contain little or no dialogue, which makes comprehension much easier. As a result, they offer intensely ‘filmic’ experiences, using images and movement, sequence and duration, sound and music to tell their stories. These silent films are perfect for the language classroom as they can be used with any level – the teacher just needs to adapt the difficulty of the task to match the level of the students. Here are the seven short films which I have found work best in the language classroom.

Pernilla's English Classroom: Peek of the week I encounter students on a weekly basis who say "I hate reading" or "I just can't focus on a book" ...times are changing - a great deal - and it's a fact that teenagers are becoming more digitally literate, but unfortunately more BOOK illiterate. I find this to be a necessary part of our digital evolution, however I also see it as a tragic part of a lost era where kids today are finding it hard to focus on a book, or anything else, for a longer period of time. I still remember the books that I read as a nerdy teenager, the books that became a part of my daily life, the books that still linger with me because I was sucked into them and could never leave them, books that haunted me, books that taught me a valuable lesson or two, books that made me realize that there was a different, mesmerizing, world outside of my own room, books that I need to recommend to anyone reading this. Peek of the week 18 takes a look at GREAT books: Lord of the flies by William Golding The Body by Stephen King

Movie Segments for Warm-ups and Follow-ups: Body Language There is always space for discussions on body language. These two scenes are perfect to warm the topic up. Besides, they are fun scenes. A. How can film help you teach or learn English? What can film and video add to the learning experience? Kieran Donaghy, who won the British Council’s Teaching English blog award for his post I want to learn English because…, explains why film is such a good resource, and recommends some useful websites. Language teachers have been using films in their classes for decades, and there are a number of reasons why film is an excellent teaching and learning tool. Learning from films is motivating and enjoyable Motivation is one of the most important factors in determining successful second-language acquisition.

The Other Pair This ELT lesson plan is designed around a short film by Sarah Zorik titled The Other Pair and the themes of altruism and empathy. Students watch a short film, write a story, and speak about a story. I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free. Language level: Pre-intermediate (A2) –Intermediate (B1)

ESL Activities, Using English Songs, Music Activities for TEFL Teachers Fun Games For ESL - ESL Printable, Interactive Fun Games Pronunciation & Intonation: Teach English pronunciation using printable worksheets, IPA Charts, and more>> Speaking Activities: Using these worksheets, you can get a number of communicative activities going Reading Exercises -Printable Text Mazes, Reading Comprehension printable exercises Matching & Collocation Exercises- Printable Matching & Collocation Exercises Lesson Plan Resources for ESL Adults classes.

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