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Best Websites for Teaching & Learning 2014

Best Websites for Teaching & Learning 2014
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Classroom Aid | Tools for Video Editing and Conferencing Converter Freemake offers freeware in the truest sense of the word: no feature or time limitations, includes Video Converter, Video Downloader, YouTube Converter, Audio Converter and Free Music Box! Video editing, animation creation and related tools Animoto can create presentations incorporating images, video clips, music and text. Aviary provides a suite of online tools that allows you to take create images, edit screenshots, edit sounds and create music. GoAnimate is a fun app that lets you make animated videos, for free, in just 10 minutes, without having to draw. Kerpoof – Explore, create, and design at Kerpoof. Fluxtime is an interesting tool that allows the user to record actions as they move things around the screen, manually creating the animation. EmbedPlus ia a free tool which enables you to enhance the viewer experience on YouTube videos, like chopping, sweet spot marking, slow motion on demand, scene skipping, zooming, annotation and real-time reactions from internet.

It’s Not About Shelving The Books and Keeping Kids Quiet | Nick Earls Some schools no longer have teacher-librarians and, the more I see of teacher-librarians, the less sense that makes to me. What’s next? No teachers? Kids turning up to the classroom each morning and inventing the day ahead? Each time I’m told that a school no longer has a teacher-librarian, I’m told that the school still has a library, as though the building does the job all by itself. Some news for schools thinking of going librarian-free: having some books on shelves in the school’s second-biggest building – along with a chillout zone with half a dozen lunch-stained beanbags – does little for your students lives without a well-trained passionate human or two in there to wake the place up and get the most out of it. Some advice to anyone running school budgets anywhere: CUT THE TEACHER-LIBRARIANS LAST. Promoting reading promotes literacy and prepares students for life. I’ve seen the alternative too. ‘We don’t have a librarian, but they check their own books out,’ I’ve been told.

Assessing 21st Century Skills at school Recently, one of the teachers who is participating in our district’s 21st Century Learning grant project came to talk with me about assessing 21 century skills – one of the expectations for teachers in this project. Her observation was that students frequently practice the skills when engaged in research or project based learning. The thing she was struggling, with, though, was how to “grade it.” Assessing skills like collaboration, information literacy, creativity, self-direction, and critical thinking seems like a difficult task–when you think of assessment as “grading.” To understand what is meant by assessment of 21st century skills we need to examine the term “assessment.” So to effectively assess skills and habits of mind –we must design a performance task for the students. One of the most difficult tasks of designing an effective formative assessment tool for 21st century skills is deciding what criteria should be included.

Trust me, I'm a librarian | Trust me, I'm a librarian 30+ More Content Curation Tools One of our most popular posts is 30+ Cool Content Curation Tools , which is a great list of over 30 different tools that will help your discover, share and curate content for your blog, website or social media presence. Our readers have left a lot of great suggestions in the comment section for additional curation tools and resources, and it seems more new tools crop up every week. So today we’re back with another huge list of content curation tools that includes some old favorites (like Google Reader, that we somehow overlooked on our original list…shame on us!) (Note: Tools not listed in any particular order!) We hope you have fun exploring these tools! Comments(21)

Read the Fine Print School Libraries and Makerspaces: Can They Coexist? More and more schools are coming to value maker education and exploring ways to create makerspaces in their schools. Many schools are discussing how they might utilize their library to facilitate this. As my school has increased our commitment to constructionist learning and maker education over the last few years, we have done so in close collaboration with our school library. In exploring the relationship between the school library and school makerspace, it's not difficult to see why conversations about the growth of makerspaces are often tied to the conversation about the future of libraries. Both makerspaces and libraries are constructivist learning spaces that share a number of common goals, while approaching them in different ways and through very different material resources. Similar Yet Distinct Makerspaces and libraries are sites of informal learning. Libraries and makerspaces are inherently interdisciplinary spaces. Makerspaces and libraries are more than just resource closets.

Pearltrees Social Library – Collate and Collaborate Posted on September 2, 2013 by R Chambers So this holiday I have developed a new addiction! Pearltrees! Pearltrees is a fantastic visual and collaborative social library tool with great potential in education! You can synchronise your account with other social networking tools, namely Twitter and Facebook – broadcasting new pearls added (you have to enable this feature so you don’t have to do this) or collecting new pearls when a link is added. When you create an account and pearltrees, these are public, however there is a premium option for creating private pearltrees and private collaborations which enables you to control your privacy settings should you wish. Here are links to 3 of my Pearltrees which may be of use: 1. iPads in Education 2. I will developing these further during the academic year. Like this: Like Loading... Related Filed under: Uncategorized |

Opinion: Dear Congressman, Research Shows Closing School Libraries and Cutting Certified Librarians Does Not Make Sense Last April, after I’d criticized my congressman—Jim Himes of District 4 in Connecticut—in a column, he asked if we could meet for a “deep dive” on education issues so he could understand why they have become so polarizing. His response was to ask me if there is research to justify the salary of a media specialist. My answer was a resounding “Yes!” There is ample research, and I gathered much of it myself from existing studies while also conducting my own informal online research questionnaire for school librarians and librarians. It tells us children in poverty grow up with fewer books in the home and less access to bookstores and public libraries than their higher Supplemental Education Services counterparts (Neuman and Celano, 2001). If we’re trying to close the achievement gap, library cuts make even less sense. Congressman Jim Himes of District 4 in Connecticut. I received 128 responses to my questionnaire from librarians representing 24 states. That’s for the libraries that remain.

Good resources for library website design I recently spoke to a local library co-op about designing user-centered library websites. In this post I thought I’d share the list of resources I compiled as part of that presentation. Below are some sites, blogs, books, articles, and tools that I have found useful in my own web design projects. They are organized into four areas: Usability – general usability resources.Library website design – resources for public and academic site design.Mobile site design – resources for library mobile site design.Accessibility – resources for designing for visually impaired users. I. Usability.gov: Usability Guidelines from Usability.gov: Krug, Steve. (2005). Steve Krug’s website: Jakob Nielsen’s website: “Top 10 mistakes in website design” by Jakob Nielsen: Mobile Usability from Jakob Nielsen: II.

Audiotool - make music in your browser Helping Students Become Better Online Researchers Your students are probably Internet authorities. When it comes to Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube, they might know far more than you. All of that time spent tweeting and chatting doesn’t necessarily translate to deep learning though. As students progress through school, online research skills become more important — for good reason. Both college professors and employers will expect young people to know their way around the academic side of the Internet; a skill that for many students, needs to be taught. Image via Flickr by Brad Flickinger For many students, doing research means typing a word or two into a Google search and using information from the first link that pops up. Common Sense Media You will find lesson plans to teach strategic searches to middle school and high school students. Google Of course Google will be a go-to source both for doing searches and for finding related lessons. Do you have a complicated relationship with Wikipedia? Teaching Channel Read Write Think Google Books

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