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Mindset Quotes by Carol S. Dweck

Mindset Quotes by Carol S. Dweck

http://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/40330-mindset-the-new-psychology-of-success

Related:  Pedagogy & Issues in Higher EducationPositive psychologyMindset

Mindset, Strengths, and Lasting Hope: An event hosted by Academic First Year Experiences at California State University, Northridge A Summer 2013 Workshop for U100 Faculty with Nyla Dalferes and Erin Delaney University 100 faculty members Erin Delaney and Nyla Jolly Dalferes presented this summer workshop on mindset, StrengthsQuest, and lasting hope in July 2013. The focus was on using principles of positive psychology in University 100 classes to build student confidence and to enable students to succeed at the university. Though it's not possible to sum up the workshop adequately after the fact, you can still learn from the materials that Erin and Nyla provided; they are listed below under "Resources."

A Positivity Ratio to Tip You to Flourishing? Or “The Happiness Tipping Point” NOTE: The idea of Positivity Ratio of 3:1 as a magic gateway to flourishing was challenged in a 2013 American Psychologist article by Brown, Sokal and Friedman. Losada, who managed the non-linear mathematical equations, was not able to mount a mathematical rebuttal to this critical review. A response by Fredrickson in the same American Psychologist issue stepped away from the 3:1 ratio as a defining turning point.

New study yields instructive results on how mindset affects learning Stanford Report, February 7, 2007 When psychology Professor Carol Dweck was a sixth-grader at P.S. 153 in Brooklyn, N.Y., she experienced something that made her want to understand why some people view intelligence as a fixed trait while others embrace it as a quality that can be developed and expanded. Dweck's teacher that year, Mrs. Wilson, seated her students around the room according to their IQ. Four questions that encourage growth mindset among students Teachers have long battled with how to get their students to become more resilient and improve their mindset. One popular theory, pioneered by Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford University, is the idea of growth mindset. Dweck explains that some students believe ability is malleable and can be improved (a growth mindset), while others think it is set in stone, probably decided at birth (a fixed mindset). Evidence suggests that those with a growth mindset seek out feedback on how to get better, persist with work for longer and cope better with change – all attitudes teachers want to develop in their young charges. How can teachers encourage a growth mindset?

Carol Dweck: 'The whole idea of growth mindset is to say yes they can' Carol Dweck is education’s guru of the moment. The US academic’s “growth mindset” theory has taken schools on both sides of the Atlantic by storm. When TES met the Stanford University psychology professor at the Festival of Education at Wellington College last week, the mere mention of her name was sending teachers into shivers of excitement. But the woman herself is refreshingly modest about the success of her philosophy. “You never know how influential your idea is going to be,” she says, smiling. “It’s really gratifying that people have resonated to it.”

What is PBL? Project Based Learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge. In Gold Standard PBL, Essential Project Design Elements include: Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Success Skills - The project is focused on student learning goals, including standards-based content and skills such as critical thinking/problem solving, collaboration, and self-management. Challenging Problem or Question - The project is framed by a meaningful problem to solve or a question to answer, at the appropriate level of challenge. Sustained Inquiry - Students engage in a rigorous, extended process of asking questions, finding resources, and applying information. Authenticity - The project features real-world context, tasks and tools, quality standards, or impact – or speaks to students’ personal concerns, interests, and issues in their lives.

EdintheClouds: Carol Dweck Revisits the 'Growth Mindset' By Carol Dweck For many years, I secretly worked on my research. I say "secretly" because, once upon a time, researchers simply published their research in professional journals—and there it stayed. Why Talking About the Brain Can Empower Learners Knowledge about how the brain works can make a big difference when confronting difficult learning situations. If you have a growth mindset and are aware of the ability to improve oneself, a challenge can be welcome (versus those with a fixed mindset who are averse to the failures a challenge may bring). Stanford University professor of psychology Carol Dweck, who has been leading the research in this field, discusses “The power of believing that you can improve” in this TED talk. In one example, she talks about students who made vast improvements on test scores once they learned about the growth mindset: “This happened because the meaning of effort and difficulty were transformed. Before, effort and difficulty made them feel dumb, made them feel like giving up, but now, effort and difficulty, that’s when their neurons are making new connections, stronger connections.

bell hooks Urges "Radical Openness" in Teaching, Learning (The Council Chronicle, Sept. 04) When bell hooks writes about "education as the practice of freedom," she's "talking about that quality of education that is enabling and empowering and that allows us to grow." She adds, "The heart of education as a practice of freedom is to promote growth. It's very much an act of love in that sense of love as something that promotes our spiritual and mental growth." She credits education in this sense with fueling her own journey: "When people frequently ask me, 'What changed your life; what enabled you to come from this working-class, segregated home where [your] parents were not college-educated people into being one of our nation's well-known intellectuals?' [My answer is,] 'It's there in that space where I learned to be a reader and a critical thinker.'" She believes that one of the most important issues for English teachers is to build critical thinking skills through reading.

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