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Everything We Know About Facebook's Secret Mood Manipulation Experiment

Everything We Know About Facebook's Secret Mood Manipulation Experiment
Updated, 09/08/14 Facebook’s News Feed—the main list of status updates, messages, and photos you see when you open Facebook on your computer or phone—is not a perfect mirror of the world. But few users expect that Facebook would change their News Feed in order to manipulate their emotional state. We now know that’s exactly what happened two years ago. This tinkering was just revealed as part of a new study, published in the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The experiment is almost certainly legal. In the wake of both the Snowden stuff and the Cuba twitter stuff, the Facebook "transmission of anger" experiment is terrifying. — Clay Johnson (@cjoh) June 28, 2014 Get off Facebook. We’re tracking the ethical, legal, and philosophical response to this Facebook experiment here. This research was conducted for a single week in 2012 and none of the data used was associated with a specific person’s Facebook account. And on Sunday afternoon, Adam D.I. The first?

Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks Happiness and other emotions spread between people in direct contact, but it is unclear whether massive online social networks also contribute to this spread. Here, we elaborate a novel method for measuring the contagion of emotional expression. With data from millions of Facebook users, we show that rainfall directly influences the emotional content of their status messages, and it also affects the status messages of friends in other cities who are not experiencing rainfall. For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony. Figures Citation: Coviello L, Sohn Y, Kramer ADI, Marlow C, Franceschetti M, et al. (2014) Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks. Editor: Renaud Lambiotte, University of Namur, Belgium Received: September 20, 2013; Accepted: January 29, 2014; Published: March 12, 2014 Introduction Results

Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks Author Affiliations Edited by Susan T. Fiske, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, and approved March 25, 2014 (received for review October 23, 2013) Significance We show, via a massive (N = 689,003) experiment on Facebook, that emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Abstract Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading them to experience the same emotions as those around them. The interpretation of this network effect as contagion of mood has come under scrutiny due to the study’s correlational nature, including concerns over misspecification of contextual variables or failure to account for shared experiences (4, 5), raising important questions regarding contagion processes in networks. Fig. 1. Acknowledgments

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