background preloader

Makercamp.com

Makercamp.com

http://makercamp.com/

Related:  maker faire ideasMaker SpaceMaker studio

Building a Common School Vision For Your Makerspace As more and more educational institutions are incorporating tinkering and “maker mindset” into their educational programs, the processes leading up to that incorporation vary broadly. In some schools, spaces for “making” and tinkering are outfitted before any programmatic discussions take place among the faculty (top-down). On others, a few teachers band together and develop a makerspace with little institutional support (bottom-up). My school fell into a wonderful medium between the two: 3 years ago, our board offered to incorporate a new makerspace into the large construction initiative that was just beginning and recruited a small group of teachers to start investigating, experimenting, and preparing the way.

Shooting Projectiles This tutorial explains how to create the effect of shooting, launching, or throwing an object. The code in this article does not simulate velocity or parabolic motion, but to a projectile that, after the initial force, is not acted upon by any traditional force (gravity, wind, etc.), though it may be obstructed by walls or targets. In each example, the projectile shoots when the space key is pressed, but the trigger can be any Boolean Block. Camp Google is a month long online science camp for kids, launching on July 13 The Internet has changed the way we access, view, ingest, and share knowledge, and Google has played a big part in that, with its mission from day one being to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible. Now through a new project called Google Camp, the company will train kids to utilize their services as early as possible — starting from the ages of 7-10 years old, specifically. The program seems to focus on online project-based science lessons…

100 Ways to Make Maker Faire Year-Round Maker Faire is happening all around the world and all through the year. For those of us who plan our year around Maker Faire Bay Area, however, we’re two weeks into 52 weeks of Maker Faire withdrawal. For ourselves and all of you, we’ve put together a small poster with 100 ways to make it through these 365 days, and to keep on making year-round. These 100 things will keep you making until your next trip to any Maker Faire near you no matter where you live. Here’s a starter list of fun projects you can do to make every day a Maker day. KitHub Designed to Empower Young Innovators KitHub, “creative electronics for young innovators,” is a kit-of-the-month club for young makers, their parents, and their families. It was designed to empower kids and parents who weren’t necessarily close to a physical makerspace, by two women — Tara Tiger Brown and Luz Rivas — who are passionately devoted to maker education, not by an edu-biz conglomerate or VC-founded startup. Brown has served as an entrepreneur, executive director, technical director and lead product manager for the MacArthur Foundation-supported Connected Learning Alliance, Annenberg Innovation Lab at USC, Born This Way Foundation, Topspin Media, and Microsoft, and is co-founder and chairwoman at LA Makerspace. Rivas, who has a B.S. in electrical engineering from MIT and a master’s in technology in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, founded DIY Girls to bring technology tinkering and learning to Latinas in the Los Angeles area.

chibitronics Introduction Beginner tutorials to help you get started with paper circuits! Each tutorial comes with free a downloadable template for classroom use. Learn Minecraft Hour of Code Grades 2+ | Blocks Moana: Wayfinding with Code Makers WNET is a proud partner of the Maker Party, an initiative hosted by Mozilla, the MacArthur Foundation, and the National Writing Project in which people around the world meet up, learn to make things, and share what they've made online. This collection is designed to support the Maker Party by providing a one-stop shop of STEM and digital making resources that focus on the problem, technology, or process behind object creation. Teachers can use the collection, which is categorized into design, how to (DIY), arts and crafts, robotics, and engineering subtopics, in conjunction with hands-on activities to further this initiative.

ISTE 2015: Takeaway Tips for a Library Maker Space Maker station at the ISTE Librarians Digital Age Playground at the 2015 ISTE conference in Philadelphia. The maker movement was front and center at the 2015 ISTE conference—and that’s a good thing for me. After following maker initiatives with great interest for some time now, I have the opportunity to design a maker space this year for 6th–12th grade students at my school, Worcester (MA) Academy. A search of this year’s program at ISTE, held June 28 to July 1 in Philadelphia, using the term “constructivist learning/maker movement” resulted in 67 related sessions. The ISTE Librarians Network hosted a maker station at their Digital Age Playground and convened a panel on library maker spaces, featuring elementary and middle school librarians, a school administrator, and the coordinator of a public library maker initiative. Vendors and exhibitors demonstrated tools, lessons, and ideas for maker spaces.

DressCode Computational design is the practice of using programing to create and modify form, structure and ornamentation. Through computational design it is possible to create unique, beautiful, functional and personal objects and experience a rewarding creative process through programing. Unfortunately, use of programming as a medium for art and design, especially by young people and non-professionals is limited. Many people consider computer programing to be a highly specialized, difficult and inaccessible activity that only has relevance as a career path rather than as a mode of personal expression. 3D Printed Robot Marty Makes Learning Robotics Easy - Silicon Living 17 Shares Share Tweet Email 3D Printed GoPro Cannon Cam The original Cannon Cam shell was one of the first custom 3D projects I made when I started working at Make Labs. Due to the design constraints of the Thing-O-Matic 3D printer, the idea was doomed from the start, but I printed it out anyway. (It looked cool and I was excited about 3D printing.) It sat on my workbench for 3 years, until my editor noticed it during a brainstorm session for new 3D-printed projects.

Related: