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Online Etymology Dictionary

Online Etymology Dictionary
This is a map of the wheel-ruts of modern English. Etymologies are not definitions; they're explanations of what our words meant and how they sounded 600 or 2,000 years ago. The dates beside a word indicate the earliest year for which there is a surviving written record of that word (in English, unless otherwise indicated). This should be taken as approximate, especially before about 1700, since a word may have been used in conversation for hundreds of years before it turns up in a manuscript that has had the good fortune to survive the centuries. The basic sources of this work are Weekley's "An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English," Klein's "A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the English Language," "Oxford English Dictionary" (second edition), "Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology," Holthausen's "Etymologisches Wörterbuch der Englischen Sprache," and Kipfer and Chapman's "Dictionary of American Slang." A full list of print sources used in this compilation can be found here.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php

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Convert your image to ICO format Online image converter Create an ICO image from a variety of source formats with this online ICO converter. The maximum size for the ICO format is 256 pixel. If you do not enter an image size, your file will get automatically resized to that image size. Devanagari Origins[edit] Devanagari is part of the Brahmic family of scripts of Nepal, India, Tibet, and South-East Asia.[4] It is a descendant of the Gupta script, along with Siddham and Sharada.[4] Eastern variants of Gupta called nāgarī are first attested from the 7th century CE; from c. 1200 CE these gradually replaced Siddham, which survived as a vehicle for Tantric Buddhism in East Asia, and Sharada, which remained in parallel use in Kashmir. An early version of Devanagari is visible in the Kutila inscription of Bareilly dated to Vikram Samvat 1049 (i.e. 992 CE), which demonstrates the emergence of the horizontal bar to group letters belonging to a word.[1] nāgarī is the Sanskrit feminine of nāgara "relating or belonging to a town or city". It is feminine from its original phrasing with lipi ("script") as nāgarī lipi "script relating to a city", that is, probably from its having originated in some city.[5]

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Yep. Well for the slang in Tokyo. Maybe in Osaka is different..ah ah ah. By the way thanks God there is Google translation around. Actually, a Japanese friend told me that sometime translations have no sense...Hope I haven't create a diplomatic accident...buenas tarde by stenomast Jan 26

Uhmm, thanks know I got it. So 字源 refers to Word Origin? not only Origin? by jjcamachosanchez Jan 26

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