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Experience Just How Big the Universe is, in One Mind-Blowing Interactive

Experience Just How Big the Universe is, in One Mind-Blowing Interactive
This is the smallest unit of scale in the universe. How can you have a "smallest length"? In the same way that the speed of light has a physical limit. According to the laws of physics, if two particles were separated by the Planck length or anything less, then it is impossible to actually tell their positions apart. The planck length is thought to be the dividing line where the weird laws of quantum mechanics start to take effect. As you can see from the animation it takes a bit of zooming to reach this scale. This is the smallest unit of scale in the universe. As you can see from the animation it takes a bit of zooming to reach this scale.

http://mic.com/articles/81873/experience-just-how-big-the-universe-is-in-one-mind-blowing-interactive

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Networks of Genome Data Will Transform Medicine Breakthrough Technical standards that let DNA databases communicate. Why It Matters Your medical treatment could benefit from the experiences of millions of others. Key Players Global Alliance for Genomics and Health Google Personal Genome Project A New Thermodynamics Theory of the Origin of Life Why does life exist? Popular hypotheses credit a primordial soup, a bolt of lightning and a colossal stroke of luck. But if a provocative new theory is correct, luck may have little to do with it. Instead, according to the physicist proposing the idea, the origin and subsequent evolution of life follow from the fundamental laws of nature and “should be as unsurprising as rocks rolling downhill.”

Emotion and Music Salimpoor, V., Benovoy, M., Larcher, K., Dagher, A., and Zatorre, R.J. (2011). Anatomically Distinct Dopamine Release during Anticipation and Experience of Peak Emotion to Music. Nature Neuroscience. Space facts for kids at Super Brainy Beans The Sun The Sun comes out in the day and sits high in the sky. It gives us light and heat. The moon We're More than Stardust — We're Made of the Big Bang Itself Transcript Anna Frebel: The work of stellar archaeology really goes to the heart of the "we are stardust" and "we are children of the stars" statement. You’ve probably heard it all but what does it actually mean? We are mostly made all humans and all life forms that we know of are made mostly of carbon and a bunch of other elements but in much lesser quantities. Where does this carbon come from?

The Smartest Book About Our Digital Age Was Published in 1929 Scott Eyman’s new life of the actor John Wayne portrays an extremely complicated man who invented his own public persona and played it beautifully. “Truly, this man was the son of God.” Thus speaks a Roman centurion at the end of George Stevens’s inaptly named The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965). It’s a line that always gets a big laugh, partly because the idea of anything so irreligious as Hollywood hokum commenting on the provenance of Jesus Christ is axiomatically funny, but mostly because the centurion is played by John Wayne, a movie star who might have known a son of a gun when he saw one, but who patently knew precious little else. Except, one learns from Scott Eyman’s exhaustive new biography, John Wayne: the Life and Legend, Wayne was a rather more cultivated man than his movie persona allowed. He was a talented chess-player and no slouch at bridge, and he had a penchant for reciting Milton and Dickens and Shakespeare from memory.

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ics students devise concept for Star Wars-style deflector shields If you have often imagined yourself piloting your X-Wing fighter on an attack run on the Death Star, you'll be reassured that University of Leicester students have demonstrated that your shields could take whatever the Imperial fleet can throw at you. The only drawback is that you won't be able to see a thing outside of your starfighter. In anticipation of Star Wars Day on 4 May, three fourth-year Physics students at the University have proven that shields, such as those seen protecting spaceships in the Star Wars film series, would not only be scientifically feasible, they have also shown that the science behind the principle is already used here on Earth. They have published their findings in the Journal of Special Physics Topics, a peer-reviewed student journal run by the University's Department of Physics and Astronomy.

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Indeed! make me feel like we are nothing but dust compared to many big things. by bhaskarrac Feb 23

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