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Classroom Management and the Flipped Class

Classroom Management and the Flipped Class
Editor's Note:This post was co-authored by Aaron Sams, CEO of Sams Learning Designs, LLC and founding member of the Flipped Learning Network. Let's face it. We teachers spend far too much time and energy trying to keep students quiet so that they can listen to us. We have taken countless courses and workshops on classroom management in our careers, and it seems that the underpinning goal of classroom management is for teachers to keep kids quiet so that they can learn. Is there a better way to think about classroom management? What if the goal of class was for the students to actively engage in the content and participate in tangible ways in the learning process? Noise Is Good As we pioneered the flipped class, we got away from the front of the room and got a whole different perspective on what classroom management could look like. As we did this, the dynamics of the classroom dramatically changed. But, as with any change, we found some new challenges. 4 New Management Issues

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4 Big Things Transformational Teachers Do The key to transformational teaching is not reacting, but rather a grinding obsession with analysis and preparation. Lee Shulman, as reported by Marge Scherer, suggests that expert teachers -- despite enormous challenges --demonstrate: Cognitive understanding of how students learn; emotional preparation to relate to many students whose varied needs are not always evident; content knowledge from which to draw different ways to present a concept; and, finally, the ability to make teaching decisions quickly and act on them. So how do they do that? Let's break it down. 1.

6 Steps to Flipping A Classroom Infographic Blended Learning Infograpics 6 Steps to Flipping A Classroom Infographic The 6 Steps to Flipping A Classroom Infographic synthesizes the overwhelming to-do list of flipping your classroom into 6 easy steps that make the whole process a little less daunting. Creating the Conditions for Student Motivation Editor's Note: This piece was adapted from Building a Community of Self-Motivated Learners: Strategies to Help Students Thrive in School and Beyond by Larry Ferlazzo, available March 21, 2015 from Routledge. There are three things to remember about education. The first is motivation. The second one is motivation.

New Teachers: Designing Learning Environments The Importance of Classroom Design Why does the physical design of classrooms matter? Mark Phillips discusses this question in "A Place for Learning: The Physical Environment of Classrooms" and offers examples of and resources for turning impersonal spaces into student-friendly havens of learning. For further inspiration, VideoAmy has compiled some videos to help you begin to conceptualize your classroom vision in "Five-Minute Film Festival: Classroom Makeovers." Be sure to take a look at the resource list at the end of her post. Learning Zones, Seating, and More

Flipped classroom empowers students : Schools Think of most any classroom, from primary to high school and through college and you’ll likely picture one thing: neat rows of desks facing the same direction. Maybe instead of desks there are tables, but the seating grid system likely persists. This arrangement has been a cornerstone of learning environments for 100s of years, and yet, when else is life so neatly arranged? And how does this orderliness prepare a student for the increased freedoms of high school and college, or the self direction required by many jobs? One Chadron Primary School classroom is shaking up the status quo by offering an array of seating options, and empowering students to choose where to sit day to day and sometimes assignment to assignment. Libby Uhing’s classroom has the feel of second grade, a white board, colorful decor, big bold words, and stacks of books.

Pedagogy and Student Behaviours #GreatTeaching Every year should be a year of great teaching. Naming it as such is one thing but actually achieving it is another. A teacher needs to have a clear idea of what great teaching is and then determine their next step towards it. Crossing Thresholds – Pedagogy 10 Great Classroom Icebreakers 1. Self-Portrait. Have your students draw themselves. After they have done this, collect the papers and hang them up for the whole class to see. Now have students try to guess who the artists was for each picture. 2.

“Fliperentiated” Instruction: How to Create the Customizable Classroom In a rapidly changing learning landscape, educators of all stripes still coalesce around two steady beliefs: Students perform best under conditions that activate their preferred learning style. There is no greater predictor of success than a fantastic teacher. Effective teaching has long put the unique interests of the learner up front, allowing teachers to meet the needs of more students more of the time.

KSU The full review will be available in English after summer 2014. Summary The Knowledge Center for Education presents a systematic review with the following scope: Which forms of teacher assessment practices can have a positive impact on school quality? A Comprehensive List of Apps and Tools to Flip your Classroom For those of you intent on employing the flipped learning model in their instruction, we have curated a set of important web tools to help you create the appropriate flipped classroom environment for your students. Check them out below and as always let us know what you think of them. Enjoy 1- Explain Everything Explain Everything is an easy-to-use design tool that lets you annotate, animate, and narrate explanations and presentations.

What If Everything You Knew About Disciplining Kids Was Wrong? June Arbelo, a second-grade teacher at Central School, comforts a student who wants to go home during the first day of school. Tristan Spinski/GRAIN Leigh Robinson was out for a lunchtime walk one brisk day during the spring of 2013 when a call came from the principal at her school. Will, a third-grader with a history of acting up in class, was flipping out on the playground. He'd taken off his belt and was flailing it around and grunting.

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