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How Neighbors Can Grow a Community-Centered School to Teach Kids and Adults | MindShift Students working in the community garden alongside David Whitwam of Whitwam Organics. Courtesy of Bible Truth Ministries Academy. Suzette Dean’s tutoring sessions — which she provided free of charge to children in an economically depressed section of Tampa, Florida — were known for two things: a warm, nurturing environment, and the strides the children made, despite their struggles in conventional schools. After seeing her impact with the kids, the families urged Dean and her husband Daniel, who is a pastor, to start their own school, the Bible Truth Ministries Academy. The Deans say they’ve taken good ideas wherever they’ve found them, so long as they can help empower children to succeed in life. Both approaches emphasize collaboration and community, so it’s no accident that the academy feels more like a home than an institution, Lieberman says. But the Deans take the community service ethos even further. It Takes a Village Creating an Empowering Environment Inspiring Progress “Ms.

Occupy Your Brain On Power, Knowledge, and the Re-Occupation of Common Sense photo by Carol Black by Carol Black One of the most profound changes that occurs when modern schooling is introduced into traditional societies around the world is a radical shift in the locus of power and control over learning from children, families, and communities to ever more centralized systems of authority. While all cultures are different, in many non-modernized societies children enjoy wide latitude to learn by free play, interaction with other children of multiple ages, immersion in nature, and direct participation in adult work and activities. The child in a classroom generally finds herself in a situation where she may not move, speak, laugh, sing, eat, drink, read, think her own thoughts, or even use the toilet without explicit permission from an authority figure. The problem with this scenario should be obvious: who gets to decide what the world’s children will learn? American teacher in the Philippines, c. 1901

Why Daydreaming is Critical to Effective Learning Brynja Eldon/Flickr There’s no doubt there are more distractions bombarding students than there were 50 years ago. Most kids have cellphones, use social media, play games, watch TV and are generally more “plugged in” than ever before. Many people believe they are skilled multitaskers, but they’re wrong. “The brain doesn’t multitask,” said Daniel Levitin, author and professor of psychology, behavioral neuroscience and music at McGill University on KQED’s Forum program. People often think they are being more productive when they try to juggle tasks, but Levitin says not only is sequential unitasking detrimental to productivity, but it produces less creative work as well. Tip 1: Prioritize and Manage Time Rather than trying to do everything at the same time, the most productive people prioritize and block off their schedules to focus on one task at a time. “When they’re doing something, they’re really doing it,” Levitin said. Tip 2: Take Breaks Tip 3: Analyze Information Critically Related

6 Principles Of Genius Hour In The Classroom Genius Hour In The Classroom: 6 Principles Of Genius Hour by Terry Heick Update: We did a t-shirt campaign of this graphic last year and it sold decently (if 13 t-shirts can be considered ‘decent.’). It’s still available if you wanted a t-shirt with a kind of learning model on it. You know. Genius Hour in the classroom is an approach to learning built around student curiosity, self-directed learning, and passion-based work. In traditional learning, teachers map out academic standards, and plan units and lessons based around those standards. Genius Hour is most notably associated with Google, where employees are able to spend up to 20% of their time working on projects they’re interested in and passionate about. What’s The Difference? Genius Hour provides students freedom to design their own learning during a set period of time during school. Sense of Purpose Students must find their own sense of purpose in what they study, make sense of, and create. Design Inquiry & Navigation Create

The Value of Media Literacy Education in the 21st Century: A Conversation with Tessa Jolls Tessa: I found myself nodding yes Yes YES! as I read your response. The law of unintended consequences always follows any meaningful action — and some of our discussion falls into that category and Henry, I applaud your action and know that your intentions are the absolute best. Learners gain content knowledge through using their media literacy skills — and these skills are applicable to any content anytime, anywhere on a lifelong basis. This changed education paradigm is a radical shift in cultural and education systems where formal learning worldwide has traditionally been confined to content silos whose subject matter is warehoused in physical textbooks and dumped into students’ heads. Which brings me to the point that being media literate, undertaking research and development, teaching media literacy, and institutionalizing media literacy are widely divergent roles which require various degrees of media literacy knowledge and skills.

tlc.simplek12 Share FREE webinars with your Twitter followers and you could win a pair of Bunny Slippers! It’s a #PDnPJs Sweepstakes contest – Tweet and share this page to enter. Remember to register for all of the FREE events below! Become a Google Tools Expert August 23, 2014 Engaging Your Teachers with Online Professional Development August 27, 2014 Transform Your Classroom With Google September 6, 2014 5 Tips to Help Teachers Who Struggle with Technology "I'm not very tech savvy" is the response I usually hear from teachers that struggle with technology. Whether it's attaching a document to an email or creating a PowerPoint, some teachers really have a difficult time navigating the digital world. As schools around the globe begin to embed the use of technology in their learning environments, these teachers can be left feeling frustrated and marginalized by the new tools they are required to use but do not understand. The school where I teach is currently within its post-BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) implementation age. We started with a small cohort of tech-savvy teachers to pilot a BYOD program with selected classes. If you plan on introducing a new technology or are embarking on the mighty task of becoming a wireless BYOD school, here are five tips to help your teachers still struggling with technology. 1. Integrating technology can be very stressful for educators that aren't familiar with it. 2. 3. 4. 5.

The Top 10 Reasons Students Cannot Cite or Rely On Wikipedia 10. You must never fully rely on any one source for important information. Everyone makes mistakes. All scholarly journals and newspapers contain “corrections” sections in which they acknowledge errors in their prior work. And even the most neutral writer is sometimes guilty of not being fully objective. The focus of your search should be on finding accurate information and forming a full picture of an issue, rather than believing the first thing you read. 9. 8. In March 2009, Irish student Shane Fitzgerald, who was conducting research on the Internet and globalization of information, posted a fake quotation on the Wikipedia article about recently deceased French composer Maurice Jarre. Fitzgerald was startled to learn that several major newspapers picked up the quote and published it in obituaries, confirming his suspicions of the questionable ways in which journalists use Web sites, and Wikipedia, as a reliable source. 7. 6. 5. 4. 3. 2.

Project-Based Learning vs. Problem-Based Learning vs. X-BL At the Buck Institute for Education (BIE), we've been keeping a list of the many types of "_____- based learning" we've run across over the years: Case-based learning Challenge-based learning Community-based learning Design-based learning Game-based learning Inquiry-based learning Land-based learning Passion-based learning Place-based learning Problem-based learning Proficiency-based learning Service-based learning Studio-based learning Team-based learning Work-based learning . . . and our new fave . . . Zombie-based learning (look it up!) Let's Try to Sort This Out The term "project learning" derives from the work of John Dewey and dates back to William Kilpatrick, who first used the term in 1918. Designing and/or creating a tangible product, performance or event Solving a real-world problem (may be simulated or fully authentic) Investigating a topic or issue to develop an answer to an open-ended question Problem-Based Learning vs. Problem-based learning typically follow prescribed steps:

The Design Thinking School \ What we do Design Thinking can be a powerful vehicle for deeper learning of content, more divergent thinking and building the thinking skills capacity of learners. Key to the process's success in learning, is that it provides the platform for learners to become problem finders. At a time when design thinking tends to come across as "shop" class and post-it notes, NoTosh have spent four years developing medium- and long-term professional development programmes with schools around the world, which marry design and education research with classroom practices that work in any part of curriculum. We've seen schools increase student engagement, content coverage and attainment thanks to the challenging way we frame design thinking and formative assessment, together, as a vehicle for creative and robust learning. What is design thinking? In schools, we use design thinking as a framework onto which we hang specific thinking skills to achieve specific learning tasks. Why design thinking?

The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies Irving Sigel devoted his life to the importance of asking questions. He believed, correctly, that the brain responds to questions in ways that we now describe as social, emotional, and cognitive development. Questions create the challenges that make us learn. The essence of Irv's perspective is that the way we ask questions fosters students' alternative and more complex representations of stories, events, and circumstances, and their ability to process the world in a wider range of ways, to create varying degrees of distance between themselves and the basis events in front of them, is a distinct advantage to learning. However, Irv found that schools often do not ask the range of questions children need to grow to their potential. In this column and the next, using the story of Goldilocks and The Three Bears, we can learn from Irv about how to improve our question asking so that students learn more from text and from the world around them.

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