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Use a ‘Fake’ Location to Get Cheaper Plane Tickets

I can’t explain airline pricing but I do know some plane tickets can be cheaper depending on where you buy them or, even better, where you appear to buy them from. This is all about leveraging foreign currencies and points-of-sale to your advantage. For reasons I never quite understood, every time I tried to book a domestic flight in another country, the prices were always exorbitant. But, say, once I was in Bangkok, that same flight that was once $300 would fall to $30 almost inexplicably. This phenomenon is because a ticket’s point-of-sale—the place where a retail transaction is completed—can affect the price of any flight with an international component. Most people don’t know there is a simple trick for “changing” this to get a cheaper flight on an airline’s website; it’s how I managed to pay $371 for a flight from New York to Colombia instead of $500+. Unsurprisingly, Kayak takes a U.S. Where to change point-of-sale in Google ITA. Prices shown in Colombian pesos. I search again.

http://maphappy.org/2014/06/use-point-of-sale-to-get-cheaper-international-tickets/

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