background preloader

20 Great Rubrics for Integrating Bloom's Digital Taxonomy in Your Teaching

20 Great Rubrics for Integrating Bloom's Digital Taxonomy in Your Teaching
June 15, 2014 I have always been inspired by the great work of Andrew Church. This guy has been one of my authority sources for everything related to Bloom's digital taxonomy. Andrew provided a detailed account of how teachers can align the thinking levels of Bloom's original taxonomy with the different digital tools. I have already shared here several examples of web tools and mobile apps that can be used to promote Bloom's digital thinking skills; but today I am sharing with you some wonderful rubrics to help you integrate Bloom's digital taxonomy into your teaching. These rubrics are designed by Andrew Church and are available for free download from this page. Each of these rubrics is related to a tinkling stage of Bloom's taxonomy. Here is a quick round-up of all the Bloom's digital taxonomy rubrics created by Andrew: Remembering:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/06/20-great-rubrics-for-integrating-blooms.html

Related:  Bloom's Taxonomybloomin taksonomiaBloom's taxonomyLearning.

The New Bloom’s It’s difficult to think about doing creative, authentic projects with students when the school is consumed with test prep fever and the state tests are just a week away. Testing has, indeed, had a tremendous impact on curriculum and instruction in our schools. While tests give us benchmark data on where students are with knowledge and skill development, they often fall short of helping students develop the higher level thinking skills that 21st century students need for a technological workplace. Creative projects, on the other hand, almost always engage students in analytical and evaluative thinking. How They Get It: A New, Simple Taxonomy For Understanding How They Get It: A New, Simple Taxonomy For Understanding by Terry Heick How can you tell if a student really understands something? They learn early on to fake understanding exceptionally well, and even the best assessment leaves something on the table. (In truth, a big portion of the time students simply don’t know what they don’t know.) The idea of understanding is, of course, at the heart of all learning, and solving it as a puzzle is one of the three pillars of formal learning environments and education.

New Bloom's Taxonomy Poster for Teachers August 29, 2014 Bloom's taxonomy is one of the most popular learning taxonomies ever. Since its release in the last half of the 20th century, it has been widely adopted within the education sector and was used extensively to design and create learning materials and curriculum content. Bloom's taxonomy maps out learning skills along a thinking continuum that starts with lower order thinking skills in one end (e.g. remembering and understanding) and moves up in difficulty to the other end that embraces higher order thinking skills (e.g. evaluating and creating). However, Bloom's taxonomy has been repeatedly modified to suit the requirements of the era in which it is used . Thus, we ended up having different versions of Blooms taxonomy. The visual below from Fractus Learning captures these versions into three main columns ( Bloom's original taxonomy, Bloom's modified taxonomy, and Bloom's digital taxonomy).

Going All In: How to Make Competency-Based Learning Work Getty Images New Hampshire is the first state to change its education policies to credit high school students — and soon elementary and middle school students, too — for progressing based on what they’ve mastered, not the number of hours they spend in school. Known as a competency-based system, the idea is to define the core skills and concepts students should master and only move them forward once they’ve achieved mastery of every competency rather than their “seat time.” In traditional schools, students progress if their average grade is high enough, which may leave room for holes in their understanding of concepts they’ll need in future classes. In the most alternative application of a competency-based system, age-based grade levels would disappear and students would move through concepts at their own pace, regardless of age or grade.

Flip This: Bloom’s Taxonomy Should Start with Creating Teaching Strategies Chris Davis, Powerful Learning Practice LLC By Shelley Wright I think the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy is wrong. I know this statement sounds heretical in the realms of education, but I think this is something we should rethink, especially since it is so widely taught to pre-service teachers. A New Fantastic Bloom's Taxonomy Wheel for iPad Apps March 21, 2014 Today while I was browsing through my Twitter feeds I came across this fabulous Bloom's Taxonomy wheel of apps shared by Anthony. If you still recall, some previous versions of this wheel have already been featured here in Bloom's Taxonomy for Teachers section . As you can see, the wheel outlines a wide variety of verbs and activities related to each thinking level of Blooms taxonomy coupled with iPad apps that go with it. These apps are supposed to help teachers and students better cultivate these different thinking levels in their use of iPad apps. And because the the visual is not hyperlinked, I went ahead and provided the links for each of these apps in the lists below.

Everything Teachers Need to Know about Bloom's Digital Taxonomy April 8, 2015 Bloom's Taxonomy is one of the major themes here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning. We have been extensively sharing resources on it and we have a separate section where you can access and check all the resources we have posted so far. A refresher for you, Blooms traditional taxonomy which was published sometime in the middle of the last century was revised in 2001 and henceforth was labelled Blooms Revised Taxonomy. Awesome Visual On The Use of Google Glass in Education June 15, 2014 Although it is sill in its infancy stage, Google Glass has already began making a huge buzz around its potential uses in the education area. It is true there are now some raising voices that oppose the use of this technology and view it as a serious threat to individual privacy and a source of unsolicited distraction. But a look back at the circumstances surrounding each great invention in history proves that such voices have always been around.

K-5 iPad Apps According to Bloom's Taxonomy An elementary library media specialist reviews iPad apps as they map to an updated version of Bloom's Taxonomy in this six-part series. Diane Darrow is an artist, Reading Recovery teacher, and library media specialist at Bel Aire Elementary in Tiburon, CA. You can follow her on Twitter at @dianedarrow. In this six-part series, I will highlight apps useful for developing higher order thinking skills in grades K-5 classrooms. Each list will highlight a few apps that connect to the various stages on Bloom's continuum of learning.

Bloom's Taxonomy Bloom's wheel, according to the Bloom's verbs and matching assessment types. The verbs are intended to be feasible and measurable. Bloom's taxonomy is a classification of learning objectives within education. It is named for Benjamin Bloom, who chaired the committee of educators that devised the taxonomy, and who also edited the first volume of the standard text, Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: The Classification of Educational Goals. Bloom's taxonomy refers to a classification of the different objectives that educators set for students (learning objectives). It divides educational objectives into three "domains": cognitive, affective, and psychomotor (sometimes loosely described as "knowing/head", "feeling/heart" and "doing/hands" respectively).

Related: