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A Wonderful Copyright Flowchart for Your Class

A Wonderful Copyright Flowchart for Your Class
June 11, 2014 Today, I am adding another wonderful work in this direction. This work is realized by Silvia Rosenthal and Meryl Zeidenberg. Most of the readers of this blog know Slivia (editor of the popular blog "Langwitches") for I have shared several of her works in the past. Silvia is definitely one of the tech gurus in the field of Ed Tech and I always find quality and depth of thought in her works . Silvia has also recently published a great article entitled" Blogging As Pedagogy: Facilitate Learning" which I highly recommend for you. Source: Langwitches

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/06/a-wonderful-copyright-flowchart-for.html

Related:  Google Apps for Educatorsgood ideasLearning.

Other Infographics Student Infographics Teacher Infographics There are a lot of Copyright myths and misunderstandings – particularly when it comes to Internet Copyright Infringement. The Myths and Facts about Copyright Infringement Infographic explains how to avoid breaching Copyright and how to protect teachers and students from Copyright Infringement online. New: Google Launched Google Educator Groups (Great Learning Platform for Teachers) June 11, 2014Google Educator Groups (GEGs) is a new project launched by Google yesterday.This project aims at bringing the benefits of technology to schools, classrooms and communities across the world through the collaborative work of a community of passionate educators. GEGs is a place where educators, principals, school administrators, professors, teachers, students, and anyone else interested in using Google Products to help people learn , get to meet and collaborate with each other . Google Educators Groups allows participants to "to pick up new creative ideas from one another, and to help each other best meet the needs of their students with Google solutions. GEG activities take place both online and offline. Online GEGs provide a space for educators to discuss together and learn about one another through Google+; offline, locally run events and workshops are a way to learn and share face to face." It’s easy to get involved in GEG.

February 11, 2014 Working with digital media materials implicitly entails a tacit knowledge about the different concepts related to copyright and fair use. I have always insisted through the posts I shared in the "copyright materials for teachers " section here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on the importance of teaching our students about how to properly credit sources and documents they grab from Internet. Of course copyright literature is huge and complicated and is hard to understand it all but having a working rudimentary knowledge of what relates to copyright issues within educational settings is not something to sweat over. In this regard, I am sharing with you this great course entitled "Copyright Crash Course" from University of Texas that outlines in a very clear and eloquent language the different things we, as teachers and students, need to know about copyright. The main points covered in this course are featured below.

Curriculet Curriculet frees up my time outside of the classroom - no more collecting reading questions, trying to spot-check them, giving points for writing something down, whether or not they actually did the reading or understood it. - Jessica Rice, English Teacher at Summit Preparatory High School With Curriculet, I can not only change our reading instruction on a classroom level by flipping the instruction, but also influence reading instruction on a departmental level by encouraging the department to expand the curriculum: we can read MORE in less time with Curriculet. - Kate Baker, English teacher at Southern Regional high School I cannot WAIT to share this with my colleagues. One of the first things you definitely need to talk to your students about particularly during the first month of this new school year is the importance of respecting the copyrights of digital content they find on the net or anywhere else. Students need to understand how to correctly attribute credits to copyright holders when they include their works in classroom projects. To do this, they need to comprehend the notion of creative Commons. Educational technology and Mobile Learning has already published some good posts to help you teach your students about Creative Commons, I invite you to have a look and share with your students as well. You might want to use it for your classroom blog or probably your students need it to license some of their digital creations.

5 Excellent Free Interactive Tools to Boost Students Learning June 12, 2014 Read Write Think is a must have resource for teachers. It provides a variety of lessons, interactives, calendar activities, printables, diagrams and many other teaching and learning materials for free. I have been using it and recommending it for my fellow teachers for few years now. Read Write Think arranges its materials into different categories searchable by grade level (k-12), resource type (classroom resources, professional development resources, parent and after school resources), Learning objectives ( collaboration, comprehension, critical thinking...etc), and by themes( Arts, Careers, community…etc). Going through the materials of this website, I selected for you the 6 most popular learning activities and tools used by teachers on Read Write Think. These are :

s Copyright and Fair Use Resources This is a tool that explains everything you need to know about copyright, and then some! Learn what copyright is and is not, what it protects, what Public Domain is, what the difference is between Copyright and Plagiarism, and a LOT more. Do you remember what the acronym DMCA stands for? Click on the twelfth item in the Table of Contents to find a link to The Ultimate DMCA Guide for Students.

Nik's QuickShout: Multiple Media Search I have to say that I think Spezify has just become my favourite new search engine. I think this is a really great search engine to use in class with students or to get them to use. It's really simple. The Educator’s Guide to Copyright, Fair Use, and Creative Commons – The Edublogger The Edublogs support team regularly receives complaints and official requests to remove copyrighted content that users have placed on blogs. The legal jargon with respect to digital copyrights can be confusing – especially since different countries have their own laws and regulations. Understanding digital copyright is an essential skill we need to understand and teach our students. With this post, we hope to dispel a few myths and pull together a complete list of resources for teachers and students to use when blogging and working with content online. This post was originally written by Ronnie Burt, on the Edublogger, on Feb, 2012. It’s been re-written with content and comments from the original post combined with updated content by Sue Waters.

The Top 3 iPad Apps for Learning A New Language June , 2014 Language learning is one of the key academic areas that can be readily boosted by the use of a variety of iPad apps. These apps will allow you and your students to learn a new language and improve your communicational skills in the target language using different activities, games, and practices. The app store is teeming with language learning apps but the best three I would recommend are the following: 1- Duolingo Duolingo is a great web tool and mobile app for learning a new language. Learn about copyright and fair use issues facing writers today in this free lesson. It's especially important in the age of digital technology. Copyright and fair use In our Avoiding Plagiarism module, we gave you tips for citing, quoting, and incorporating various sources into your writing projects. However, depending on what types of sources you use, you may also have to consider copyright and fair use laws. For example, if you want to use someone else's photo or song in one of your own projects, you'll need to make sure you have the legal right to do so.

Can Parents Protect Their Kids’ School-Collected Data? Katie Hiscock Gone are the days when parents could tuck all their children’s homework in a drawer or rest assured that their child’s complete records were under lock and key, on paper, in the school’s main office. For the past few years, most American public schools have been moving student records online and many teachers have been assigning homework online. Children are logging on to school assignments in class, at home and on the go, generating a deluge of data.

1- Teach Copyright Teach Copyright is a great website where teachers and students can learn about interesting questions about copyright, technology, and law. 2- Copyright Advisory Network

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