background preloader

OpenLayers: Home

OpenLayers: Home
Put an open map widget in any web page! OpenLayers is a project of the Open Source Geospatial Foundation. Visit our sponsorship page to find out how you can become an OpenLayers sponsor. We welcome contributions of any size. If you're interested in supporting OpenLayers development, you can also use our Gittip account: Get OpenLayers Now!

http://www.openlayers.org/

Related:  Maps

How to Create a Minimalist Map Design With OpenStreetMap Mapping can be as much about choosing what data not to include as to include, so you can best focus your audience on the story you are telling. Oftentimes with data visualization projects, the story isn’t about the streets or businesses or parks, but rather about the data you’re trying to layer on the map. To help people visualize data like this, I’ve started to design a new minimal base map for [OpenStreetMap]( What’s great about OpenStreetMap is that the data is all [open]( This means I can take the data and design a totally custom experience. Once finished, the map will serve as another option to the traditional OpenStreetMap baselayer. I’m designing the new map in the open-source map design studio [TileMill]( which Development Seed has written before about [here]( The map can be used as a light, very subtle background to add data on top of for use either with our [MapBox hosting platform’s]( map builder or on its own. !

Geographic information science Geographic information science or Geographical information science (GIScience) is the scientific discipline that studies data structures and computational techniques to capture, represent, process, and analyze geographic information. It can be contrasted with geographic information systems, which are software tools. British geographer Michael Goodchild has defined this area in the 1990s, and summarized its core interests, including spatial analysis, visualization, and the representation of uncertainty.[1] GIScience is conceptually related to geography, information science, computer science, geomatics and geoinformatics, but it claims the status of an independent scientific discipline.[2] Definitions[edit] Geographic Information Science (GIScience) is the basic research field that seeks to redefine geographic concepts and their use in the context of geographic information systems. GIScience also examines the impacts of GIS on individuals and society, and the influences of society on GIS.

Protovis Protovis composes custom views of data with simple marks such as bars and dots. Unlike low-level graphics libraries that quickly become tedious for visualization, Protovis defines marks through dynamic properties that encode data, allowing inheritance, scales and layouts to simplify construction. Protovis is free and open-source, provided under the BSD License. It uses JavaScript and SVG for web-native visualizations; no plugin required (though you will need a modern web browser)! Although programming experience is helpful, Protovis is mostly declarative and designed to be learned by example. Protovis is no longer under active development.The final release of Protovis was v3.3.1 (4.7 MB).

Blog — All the maps that are fit to blog Nottingham Sprint, Wednesday 18th Sept September 11th, 2013 by Tim Schaub · 5 Comments If you’re planning on going to FOSS4G and are interested in OpenLayers 3, please join us for an open sprint on Wednesday 18th Sept on the University of Nottingham campus (Humanities A3). Core developers of the library will be on hand, and contributors of all sorts are welcome. florida/1860slavepop Powered by WorldMap florida/1860slavepop Sign in | Create Map | View Map | Help PROJ.4 2015-05-27: IMPORTANT NOTICE! proj.4 bugs are now managed on GitHub. This Trac instance has been made read-only. Issue tracker is at: ​​ The source code can be found at: ​​ Live map of London Underground trains Loading... Powered by Leaflet — Map tiles © Thunderforest, data © OpenStreetMap contributors. Live London Underground map By Matthew Somerville.

1.11 now official part of the standard software portfolio in the City of Munich! gvSIG 1.11 now official part of the standard software portfolio in the City of Munich! After several years of preparations and testing, the Department of Health and Environment of the City of Munich is happy to report that gvSIG 1.11 has now been incorporated into the City of Munich’s standard software portfolio, which means that everyone in the city administration who needs gvSIG on their desktop can have it assigned with an automatic installation procedure and is ready to go! This also means that gvSIG has finally left the confines of the Department of Health and Environment and is taking another step in the process of establishing it as an OGC compliant, Open Source alternative to proprietary software throughout the municipality. In order to support this process further and spread the news, an internal 2-day training course has been developed, targeted at an audience already familiar with GIS concepts and ready to try out a state of the art open source GIS application.

Related:  Maps