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Tense–aspect–mood - Wikipedia Tense–aspect–mood, commonly abbreviated tam and also called tense–modality–aspect or tma, is the grammatical system of a language that covers the expression of tense (location in time), aspect (fabric of time – a single block of time, continuous flow of time, or repetitive occurrence), and mood or modality (degree of necessity, obligation, probability, ability).[1] In some languages, evidentiality (whether evidence exists for the statement, and if so what kind) and mirativity (surprise) may also be included. The term is convenient because it is often difficult to untangle these features of a language. Often any two of tense, aspect, and mood (or all three) may be conveyed by a single grammatical construction, but this system may not be complete in that not all possible combinations may have an available construction. In other cases there may not be clearly delineated categories of tense and mood, or aspect and mood. Creoles[edit]

Oxford Dictionaries Some grammatical terms may be familiar to you, but others can be confusing or hard to remember. Clicking on any term below will give you a quick and clear definition. Below the categorized section you’ll find all the terms listed from A–Z, so you can browse that way if you prefer. abstract noun A noun which refers to an idea, quality, or state (e.g. warmth, liberty, happiness), rather than a physical thing that can be seen or touched.

Computer-assisted translation This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages) This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. Content and language integrated learning Content and language integrated learning (CLIL)[1] is a term created in 1994 by David Marsh[2] as a methodology similar to but distinct from language immersion and content-based instruction. It is an approach for learning content through an additional language (foreign or second), thus teaching both the subject and the language. The idea of its proponents was to create an "umbrella term" which encompasses different forms of using language as the medium of instruction.[3] CLIL is fundamentally based on methodological principles established by research on "language immersion". This kind of approach has been identified as very important by the European Commission[4] because: "It can provide effective opportunities for pupils to use their new language skills now, rather than learn them now for use later.

A Latin Dictionary - Wikipedia History[edit] The division of labour between the two editors was remarkably unequal. Short, a very thorough but slow worker, produced material for the letters A through C, but B and C were lost by Harpers, meaning that his work now only appears in the letter A (216 pages), while Lewis was solely responsible for the entries beginning with the letters B through Z (1803 pages), who worked on his spare time from his law practice.[2] In 1890 Lewis published a heavily abridged version the dictionary, entitled An Elementary Latin Dictionary, for the use of students.

German Flash Cards Quick Directions 1) Load flash cards into the Main Deck by choosing one of the following: Load cards from the database... [e.g. German 101, Vorsprung Kapitel 4] Create your own custom cards... German grammar German grammar is the grammar of the German language. Although some features of German grammar, such as the formation of some of the verb forms, resemble those of English, German grammar differs from that of English in that it has, among other things, cases and gender in nouns and a strict verb-second word order in main clauses. German has retained many of the grammatical distinctions that other Germanic languages have lost in whole or in part. There are three genders and four cases, and verbs are conjugated for person and number. Accordingly, German has more inflections than English, and uses more suffixes. For example, in comparison to the -s added to third-person singular present-tense verbs in English, most German verbs employ four different suffixes for the conjugation of present-tense verbs, namely -e for the first-person singular, -st for the second-person singular, -t for the third-person singular and for the second-person plural, and -en for the first- and third-person plural.

BBC Languages – Free online lessons to learn and study with Livemocha - Free Online Language Learning - Free Lessons Online Learn French Online : Learn French for Free Learn German podcast: German phrases, slang words, sayings and idioms

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