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Iraq War

Iraq War
Prior to the war, the governments of the United States and the United Kingdom claimed that Iraq's alleged possession of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) posed a threat to their security and that of their coalition/regional allies.[49][50][51] In 2002, the United Nations Security Council passed Resolution 1441 which called for Iraq to completely cooperate with UN weapon inspectors to verify that Iraq was not in possession of WMD and cruise missiles. Prior to the attack, the United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) found no evidence of WMD, but could not yet verify the accuracy of Iraq's declarations regarding what weapons it possessed, as their work was still unfinished. The leader of the inspectors, Hans Blix, estimated the time remaining for disarmament being verified through inspections to be "months". Background[edit] Iraq disarmament and pre-war intelligence[edit] UN weapons inspections resume[edit] Weapons of mass destruction[edit] Poison gas[edit] Related:  Conspiracy TheoriesFalse FlagADF Combined

War in Afghanistan (2001–present) U.S. President George W. Bush demanded that the Taliban hand over Osama bin Laden and expel al-Qaeda. The Taliban requested that bin Laden leave the country, but declined to extradite him without evidence of his involvement in the 9/11 attacks. In 2003, NATO assumed leadership of ISAF, with troops from 43 countries. Though vastly outgunned and outnumbered, the Taliban insurgents, most notably the Haqqani Network and Hezb-e-Islami Gulbuddin, have waged asymmetric warfare with guerilla raids and ambushes in the countryside, suicide attacks against urban targets and turncoat killings against coalition forces. While ISAF continued to battle the Taliban insurgency, fighting crossed into neighboring North-West Pakistan.[31] In 2004, the Pakistani Army began to clash with local tribes hosting al-Qaeda and Taliban militants. Historical background Origins of Afghanistan's civil war Warlord rule (1992–1996) Taliban fighters Taliban Emirate vs Northern Alliance The conflict was brutal. Al-Qaeda

Oklahoma City bombing conspiracy theories A variety of conspiracy theories have been proposed regarding the Oklahoma City bombing. These theories reject all or part of the official government report. Some of these theories focus on the possibility of additional, unindicted co-conspirators or additional explosives planted inside the Murrah Federal building. Other theories allege that government employees and officials, including US President Bill Clinton, knew of the impending bombing and intentionally failed to act on that knowledge. Oklahoma City Bombing[edit] At 9:02 a.m. Although the indictment against McVeigh and Nichols alleged that they conspired with "others unknown to the grand jury", prosecutors, and later McVeigh himself, said the bombing was solely the work of McVeigh and Nichols. Additional conspirators[edit] Additional explosives[edit] US federal government involvement[edit] Investigations[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] Crothers, Lane. Jump up ^ Rogers, J. Further reading[edit] External links[edit] Photographs[edit]

Invasion of Dagestan (1999) The Invasion of Dagestan,[4] also known as the War in Dagestan[5] and Dagestan War,[6] began, when the Chechnya-based Islamic International Brigade (IIB), an Islamist militia, led by warlords Shamil Basayev and Ibn al-Khattab, invaded the neighbouring Russian republic of Dagestan on 2 August 1999, in support of the Shura of Dagestan separatist rebels. The war ended with a major Russian victory and the retreat of the IIB. The Invasion of Dagestan served as the casus belli for the Second Chechen War. Background[edit] During the inter-war period from 1996 to 1999, war-ravaged Chechnya descended into anarchy and economic collapse. In late 1997, Bagauddin Magomedov, the ethnic Avar leader of the radical wing of the Dagestani Wahhabis (Salafism), fled with his entourage to Chechnya. The Invasion and the Russian Counter-Attack[edit] Khattab described himself as the "military commander of the operation" while Basayev was the "overall commander in the battlefield Aftermath[edit] Federal forces[edit]

Opium production in Afghanistan Harvested poppy capsules. Afghanistan opium poppy cultivation, 1994–2007 (hectares) Background (1979–present)[edit] Soviet period (1979–1989)[edit] As the Afghan government began to lose control of provinces during the Soviet invasion of 1979–80, warlords flourished and with it opium production as regional commanders searched for ways to generate money to purchase weapons, according to the UN.[7] (At this time the US was pursuing an "arms-length" supporting strategy of the Afghan freedom-fighters or Mujahideen, the main purpose being to cripple the USSR slowly into withdrawal through attrition rather than effect a quick and decisive overthrow.) As explained by Zbigniew Brzezinski: The secret operation was an excellent idea. It was alleged by the Soviets on multiple occasions that American CIA agents were helping smuggle opium out of Afghanistan, either into the West, in order to raise money for the Afghan resistance or into the Soviet Union in order to weaken it through drug addiction.

War in Afghanistan The terms Afghan War or War in Afghanistan may refer to: September 11 attacks The September 11 attacks (also referred to as September 11, September 11th, or 9/11)[nb 1] were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks launched by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda upon the United States in New York City and the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. Four passenger airliners were hijacked by 19 al-Qaeda terrorists so they could be flown into buildings in suicide attacks. Two of those planes, American Airlines Flight 11 and United Airlines Flight 175, were crashed into the North and South towers, respectively, of the World Trade Center complex in New York City. Within two hours, both towers collapsed with debris and the resulting fires causing partial or complete collapse of all other buildings in the WTC complex, as well as significant damage to ten other large surrounding structures. Background Attackers al-Qaeda The origins of al-Qaeda can be traced to 1979 when the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan. Osama bin Laden Motives Attacks

National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2012[1] is a United States federal law which besides other provisions specifies the budget and expenditures of the United States Department of Defense. The bill passed the U.S. House on December 14, 2011, the U.S. The most controversial provisions to receive wide attention were contained in subsections 1021–1022 of Title X, Subtitle D, entitled "Counter-Terrorism", authorizing the indefinite military detention of persons the government suspects of involvement in terrorism, including U.S. citizens arrested on American soil. Indefinite detention without trial: Section 1021[edit] Addressing previous conflicts with the Obama Administration regarding the wording of the Senate text, the Senate-House compromise text, in sub-section 1021(d), also affirms that nothing in the Act "is intended to limit or expand the authority of the President or the scope of the Authorization for Use of Military Force". The vote[edit] Democratic nay

Second Chechen War On 1 October Russian troops entered Chechnya.[23][24] The campaign ended the de facto independence of Chechen Republic of Ichkeria and restored Russian federal control over the territory. Although it is regarded by many as an internal conflict within the Russian Federation, the war attracted a large number of foreign fighters. As of 2009, Russia has severely disabled the Chechen separatist movement and large-scale fighting has ceased. Russian army and interior ministry troops no longer occupy the streets. The once-leveled city of Grozny has recently undergone massive reconstruction efforts and much of the city and surrounding areas have been rebuilt at a quick pace. On 15 April 2009, the counter-terrorism operation in Chechnya was officially ended.[1] As the main bulk of the army was withdrawn, the burden of dealing with the ongoing low-level insurgency mainly fell on the shoulders of the local police force. The exact death toll from this conflict is unknown. Russian Empire[edit]

Iran Iran ( i/ɪˈrɑːn/[10] or /aɪˈræn/;[11] Persian: ایران‎ [ʔiːˈɾɑn] ( )), also known as Persia (/ˈpɜrʒə/ or /ˈpɜrʃə/),[11][12] officially the Islamic Republic of Iran, is a country in Western Asia.[13][14][15] It is bordered to the northwest by Armenia and Azerbaijan, with Kazakhstan and Russia across the Caspian Sea; to the northeast by Turkmenistan; to the east by Afghanistan and Pakistan; to the south by the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman; and to the west by Turkey and Iraq. Comprising a land area of 1,648,195 km2 (636,372 sq mi), it is the second-largest nation in the Middle East and the 18th-largest in the world; with 78.4 million inhabitants, Iran is the world's 17th most populous nation.[13][16] It is the only country that has both a Caspian Sea and Indian Ocean coastline. Iran has been of geostrategic importance because of its central location in Eurasia and Western Asia and the Strait of Hormuz. Iran is a founding member of the UN, NAM, OIC and OPEC. Etymology History Classical Era

Australian Defence Force Cadets The Australian Defence Force Cadets have been a large part of the Australian community since the 19th century. After the cadets were re-raised in 1976 the three cadet services were grouped together as the Australian Services Cadet Scheme. In 2001 this was changed to the Australian Defence Force Cadets. Cadet units are referred to differently depending on the parent service. Air Force Cadet units are referred to as Squadrons, Navy Cadet units are referred to as Training Ships and Army Cadet units are referred to as Army Cadet Units. ADFC Ranks[edit] Officer of Cadets (OOC) ranks[edit] Instructor of Cadets (IOC) ranks[edit] Cadets ranks[edit] See also[edit] National Cadet Advisory Council References[edit] External links[edit]

9/11 conspiracy theories The collapse of the two World Trade Center towers and the nearby WTC7 (in this photo, the brown building to the left of the towers) is a major focus of 9/11 conspiracy theories. 9/11 conspiracy theories attribute the planning and execution of the September 11 attacks to parties other than, or in addition to, al-Qaeda[1] or claim there was advance knowledge of the attacks among high-level government officials.[2] Government investigations and independent scientific reviews have found no evidence for the theories.[3][4] Proponents of these conspiracy theories claim there are inconsistencies in the official conclusions, or evidence which was overlooked.[5] Terminology Within the context of 9/11 conspiracy theories, the terms "mainstream account", "official account" and "official conspiracy theory" all refer to: History Since the attacks, a variety of conspiracy theories have been put forward in Web sites, books, and films. 9/11 truth figures Steven E. Types of conspiracy Theories Foreknowledge

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