background preloader

New York City

New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York metropolitan area, one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world.[6] The city is referred to as New York City or the City of New York to distinguish it from the State of New York, of which it is a part. A global power city,[7] New York exerts a significant impact upon commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and entertainment. The home of the United Nations Headquarters,[8] New York is an important center for international diplomacy[9] and has been described as the cultural capital of the world.[10][11] History Early history The first documented visit by a European was in 1524 by Giovanni da Verrazzano, a Florentine explorer in the service of the French crown, who sailed his ship La Dauphine into New York Harbor. Peter Minuit is credited with the purchase of the island of Manhattan in 1626.

Francis Drake Sir Francis Drake, vice admiral (c. 1540 – 27 January 1596) was an English sea captain, privateer, navigator, slaver, and politician of the Elizabethan era. Drake carried out the second circumnavigation of the world in a single expedition, from 1577 to 1580. Elizabeth I of England awarded Drake a knighthood in 1581. His exploits were legendary, making him a hero to the English but a pirate to the Spaniards to whom he was known as El Draque.[4] King Philip II was said to have offered a reward of 20,000 ducats,[5] about £4 million (US$6.5M) by modern standards, for his life. Birth and early years Francis Drake was born in Tavistock, Devon, England. He was the eldest of the twelve sons[8] of Edmund Drake (1518–1585), a Protestant farmer, and his wife Mary Mylwaye. Because of religious persecution during the Prayer Book Rebellion in 1549, the Drake family fled from Devonshire into Kent. Marriage and family Sailing career Following the defeat at San Juan de Ulúa, Drake vowed revenge. Cadiz raid

Statue of Liberty The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World; French: La Liberté éclairant le monde) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in the middle of New York Harbor, in Manhattan, New York City. The statue, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and dedicated on October 28, 1886, was a gift to the United States from the people of France. The statue is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata (a tablet evoking the law) upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776. A broken chain lies at her feet. The statue is an icon of freedom and of the United States: a welcoming signal to immigrants arriving from abroad. Bartholdi was inspired by French law professor and politician Édouard René de Laboulaye, who is said to have commented in 1865 that any monument raised to American independence would properly be a joint project of the French and American peoples.

toronto.ca | Official website for the City of Toronto Elizabeth II Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary; born 21 April 1926[a]) is the constitutional monarch of 16 sovereign states, known as the Commonwealth realms, and their territories and dependencies, and head of the 53-member Commonwealth of Nations. She is Supreme Governor of the Church of England and, in some of her realms, carries the additional title of Defender of the Faith. Upon her accession on 6 February 1952, Elizabeth became Head of the Commonwealth and queen regnant of seven independent Commonwealth countries: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan and Ceylon. From 1956 to 1992, the number of her realms varied as territories gained independence and some realms became republics. Elizabeth was born in London and educated privately at home. Early life Princess Elizabeth aged 3, 1929 Elizabeth is the first child of Prince Albert, Duke of York (later King George VI), and his wife, Elizabeth, Duchess of York (later Queen Elizabeth). Heiress presumptive

South Street Seaport History[edit] By the late-1950s, the old Ward Line docks (Pier 15, 16, and part of 17) were mostly vacant. South Street Seaport Museum was founded in 1967 by Peter and Norma Stanford. When originally opened as a museum, the focus of the Seaport Museum conservation was to be an educational historic site, with shops mostly operating as reproductions of working environments found during the Seaport's heyday, 1820 to 1860. Designated by Congress in 1998 as one of several museums, which together make up "America's National Maritime Museum", South Street Seaport Museum sits in a 12 square-block historic district that is the site of the original port of New York City.[2] The Museum has over 30,000 square feet (2,800 m2) of exhibition space and educational facilities. ¹ During favorable weather, these vessels take the public out into New York City’s waterways. ² These vessels have been designated National Historic Landmarks by the National Park Service. Concept[edit] Pier 17 Transportation[edit]

How Seven US Cities Designed Surprisingly Great Websites The US government has been shut down for over a week, as have plenty of federally funded websites, which makes me appreciate a good civic website even more. I was able to find seven city sites that will make you feel good about government again. Maybe. What you probably think about municipal websites still likely holds true, however, which is that, for the most part: THEY ARE NOT VERY GOOD. I don’t mean to pick on Fayetteville in any way. Please enable JavaScript to watch this video. For the past 10 years, even the U.S.’s most design-savvy metropolis, New York City, was stuck in a sorry small-column purgatory that didn’t match the rest of its well-branded civic endeavours. But they’ve just launched a massive redesign of NYC.gov, which is a signal of a larger nationwide shift, says Michal Pasternak, who led the redesign at the firm HUGE. Focusing on users meant that HUGE had to make drastic changes to the site’s navigation. New York City | nyc.gov Chattanooga | chattanooga.gov

Frankfurt Frankfurt am Main (/ˈfræŋkfərt/; German pronunciation: [ˈfʁaŋkfʊɐ̯t am ˈmaɪ̯n] ( )), commonly known as Frankfurt, is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany, with a 2012 population of 687,775.[2] The urban area had an estimated population of 2,300,000 in 2010.[3] The city is at the centre of the larger Frankfurt Rhine-Main Metropolitan Region which has a population of 5,600,000[4] and is Germany's second-largest metropolitan region. Since the enlargement of the European Union in 2013, the geographic centre of the EU is about 40 km (25 mi) east of Frankfurt. Frankfurt is the largest financial centre in continental Europe and ranks among the world's leading financial centres. It is home to the European Central Bank, Deutsche Bundesbank, Frankfurt Stock Exchange and several large commercial banks. Frankfurt is therefore considered a global city (alpha world city) as listed by the Loughborough University group's 2010 inventory. Name[edit]

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts History and facilities[edit] A consortium of civic leaders and others led by (and under the initiative of) John D. Rockefeller III built Lincoln Center as part of the "Lincoln Square Renewal Project" during Robert Moses's program of urban renewal in the 1950s and 1960s.[2] Respected architects were contacted to design the major buildings on the site, and over the next thirty years the previously blighted area around Lincoln Center became a new cultural hub.[3] While the center may have been named because it was located in the Lincoln Square neighborhood, it is unclear whether the area was named as a tribute to U.S. The center's cultural institutions also make use of facilities located away from the main campus. The development of the condominium at 3 Lincoln Center,[6] completed in 1991, designed by Lee Jablin, Harman Jablin Architects, made possible the expansion of The Juilliard School and the School of American Ballet.[6][7][8] Performance facilities at the Center[edit] Architects[edit]

Related: