background preloader

Conjunctions: and, or, but, so, because and although

Conjunctions: and, or, but, so, because and although
Daisy: Are you and Alfie going to the festival this weekend?Oliver: Hmm? We want to, but we don't have a car so we're not sure how to get there. It's in the middle of nowhere! Related:  Transition and linking wordsEnglish for younger students and beginnersGrammar

Linking Words — A complete List of English Connecting Words Linking & Connecting Words It is essential to understand how Linking Words, as a part of speech, can be used to combine ideas in writing - and thus ensure that ideas within sentences and paragraphs are elegantly connected - for the benefit of the reader. This will help to improve your writing (e.g. essay, comment, summary (scientific) review, (research) paper, letter, abstract, report, thesis, etc.). It is also fundamental to be aware of the sometimes subtle meaning of these "small" words within the English language. "Linking Words" is used as a term to denote a class of English words which are employed to link or connect parts of speech or even whole sentences. Conjunctions and Transition Words Connecting Words Relations Between Words A concept is an idea - and what is an idea? So, a concept can be expressed as something between a single word, and an elaborate and in extenso described philosophy. Complete List of Linking & Connecting Words Download

Beginner 1-2 - WebEnglish.se.se Beginner English, Swedish classes 1-2, lesson periods in Sweden are normally 20-30 minutes once or twice a week. Some teachers just choose to take “English moments” now and then when time allows. WebEnglish.se recommends these periods/moments to consist of songs/rhymes, vocabulary and dialogues/stories either in themes or randomly. Click the category name and see the results listed below: Direct links to Christmas pages:

Adverbs of frequency Oliver: No, no! I can never answer the yellow questions – they're about history or politics or something, I think. I'll have an orange question, please, Mr Anderson! Reported speech We use reported speech when we want to tell someone what someone said. We usually use a reporting verb (e.g. say, tell, ask, etc.) and then change the tense of what was actually said in direct speech. So, direct speech is what someone actually says? Like 'I want to know about reported speech'? Yes, and you report it with a reporting verb. He said he wanted to know about reported speech. I said, I want and you changed it to he wanted. Exactly. She said she was having the interview at four o’clock. OK, in that last example, you changed you to me too. Yes, apart from changing the tense of the verb, you also have to think about changing other things, like pronouns and adverbs of time and place. 'We went yesterday.' > She said they had been the day before. I see, but what if you’re reporting something on the same day, like 'We went yesterday'? Well, then you would leave the time reference as 'yesterday'. 'Dogs can’t eat chocolate.' > She said that dogs can’t eat chocolate. Exactly. OK. Yes. Great.

So / Such The following is a mini-tutorial on the use of "so" and "such." After you have studied the tutorial, complete the associated exercises. If you already know how to use "so" and "such," you can skip the explanation and go directly to the exercises. So + Adjective "So" can be combined with adjectives to show extremes. Examples: The music is so loud! USE with "That" The above form can be combined with "that" to show extremes which lead to certain results. The music is so loud that I can't sleep. So + Adverb "So" can be combined with adverbs to show extreme actions. She spoke so quickly! The above form can be combined with "that" to show extreme actions which lead to certain results. She spoke so quickly that I couldn't understand her. So + Many / Few + Plural Noun "So" can be combined with "many" or "few" plus a plural noun to show extremes in amount. I never knew you had so many brothers! The above form can be combined with "that" to show extremes in amount which lead to certain results.

Cohesion: linking words and phrases 1.33 Cohesion: linking words and phrases You can use words or short phrases which help to guide your reader through your writing, and to link sentences, paragraphs and sections both forwards and backwards. Good use will make what you have written easy to follow; bad use might mean your style is disjointed, probably with too many short sentences, and consequently difficult to follow. The best way to "get a feel" for these words is through your reading. Don't forget "AND"! There follows a list of words and phrases that can be used. Here are just a few examples of some of the words in action: Desktop computers are cheaper and more reliable than laptops; furthermore, they are more flexible. Prices fell by more than 20% last year. On the whole, his speech was well received, despite some complaints from new members. The South East of the UK often has the coldest weather in the winter. It was a very expensive holiday, the weather was bad and the people weren’t very friendly. Answers

Vocabulary Games, English Vocabulary Word Games The present simple We use the present simple to talk about repeated actions or events, permanent states or things which are always true. To find out more about the present simple, read and listen to the conversation below. Can you give me some examples? Yes, of course. We use the present simple to talk about things which are repeated every day, every week, every year, etc. I usually get up at 7 o'clock. I see. Yes, we often use adverbs of frequency sometimes, often, usually or other time expressions like on Mondays, twice a week or in the summer. What about permanent states? Permanent states are situations or feelings which are not temporary. I like him a lot. We also use the present simple for general facts, for example when talking about science or geography. Thailand is really hot at this time of year. So what do I need to know about forming the present simple? The main thing is that the third person singular forms end in –s or –es. He watches black and white films at his cinema club on Wednesdays. Exactly!

Modals of deduction Daisy: This is so good. I … Oh, that might be Mum phoning from Bali. I’ll put her on speaker. Hi, Mum!Ollie: Hi, Mum! CONJUNCTIONS Conjunctions are words used as joiners. Different kinds of conjunctions join different kinds of grammatical structures. The following are the kinds of conjunctions: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so Coordinating conjunctions join equals to one another: words to words, phrases to phrases, clauses to clauses. Coordinating conjunctions usually form looser connections than other conjunctions do. Coordinating conjunctions go in between items joined, not at the beginning or end. Punctuation with coordinating conjunctions: When a coordinating conjunction joins two words, phrases, or subordinate clauses, no comma should be placed before the conjunction. A coordinating conjunction joining three or more words, phrases, or subordinate clauses creates a series and requires commas between the elements. A coordinating conjunction joining two independent clauses creates a compound sentenceand requires a comma before the coordinating conjunction These conjunctions join independent clauses together.

Linking words Home » English Grammar » Linking words help you to connect ideas and sentences when you speak or write English. We can use linking words to give examples, add information, summarise, sequence information, give a reason or result, or to contrast ideas. Here's a list of the most common linking words and phrases: Giving examples For exampleFor instanceNamely The most common way to give examples is by using for example or for instance. Namely refers to something by name." Adding information AndIn additionAs well asAlsoTooFurthermoreMoreoverApart fromIn addition toBesides Ideas are often linked by and. "We discussed training, education and the budget." You can use also with not only to give emphasis." We don't usually start a sentence with also. As well as can be used at the beginning or the middle of a sentence." Too goes either at the end of the sentence, or after the subject and means as well." Apart from and besides are often used to mean as well as, or in addition to." Summarising Sequencing ideas

jr.brainpop Did you click on a BrainPOP Jr. link from your My BrainPOP Timeline? Please use your computer to go to BrainPOP Jr. Make the BrainPOP Jr. Movie of the Week app part of your day in the classroom, at home or on the go! To access BrainPOP Jr.’s Movie of the Week on an Android device, iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch, download our FREE Movie of the Week app. You’ll get a different animated, educational movie – plus its related quizzes and bonus features – delivered right to your mobile device every Monday. Ideal for kids in Kindergarten through grade 3, the BrainPOP Jr. Since its 2006 launch, BrainPOP Jr. has been a safe and trusted online environment where early learners can further explore what they’re studying at school, or delve into any other age-appropriate subject they’re curious about. What is BrainPOP Jr.?

Related: