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Curation as a tool for teaching and learning (with images) · hbailie

Curation as a tool for teaching and learning (with images) · hbailie
Kelly (2013) has taken Beth Kanter’s mantra of Seek, Sense, Share (in reference to using social media for professional learning; itself an adaptation of Jarche's Network Learning Model (Jarche 2010)) (Kanter, 2011) and applied it to curation as + Seek - aggregate and filter relevant content+ Sense - the human component - make sense of and add value to the information by placing it in the appropriate context; justify the inclusion of the information.+ Share - use social media and/or a curation platform to deliver the messages to others Similar to Siemens (2007) Connectivist approach, Kanter writes from a networked learning perspective.

http://storify.com/hbailie/curation-as-a-tool-for-teaching-and-learning-1

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Thing One: Twitter – Learn, do, teach...too I’ve been using Twitter since October 2008. Seems like a long time now but at the time I felt like a late-adopter. Earlier in 2008 I’d completed SLAV’s original 23 things course and started this amazing personal/professional learning roller coaster that hasn’t shown signs of slowing yet. At that time Twitter wasn’t part of 23 Things. I know, hard to believe now! But it was definitely growing in use and was being written about regularly in the blogs I was reading voraciously at the time. Blogging as a Curation Platform I have written about curation before using Twitter as a Curation Tool and about the importance of helping our Students Becoming Curators of Information. Sue Waters also just published a very comprehensive Curation: Creatively Filtering Content on her blog. According to Heidi Cohen

9 Characteristics Of 21st Century Learning The label of “21st Century learning” is vague, and is an idea that we here at TeachThought like to take a swing at as often as possible, including: –weighing the magic of technology with its incredible cost and complexity –underscoring the potential for well thought-out instructional design –considering the considerable potential of social media platforms against its apparent divergence from academic learning Learn, do, teach... I published my digital essay on Storify on Sunday afternoon and publicised the fact on Twitter and through the subject forums. By Monday night Storify showed that it had had around 50 views. Like me, I imagined most of the other INF530 students were eagerly reading the work of their fellow students as it became available. How is “Connected” Connected? As with many words, the word “connected “ can be used for many things. At one point in time “being connected” implied a criminal connection to some sort of organized crime. Being connected has also meant having ties to the higher ups in an organization for the purpose of favors and perks. The word connection, simply stated, means to be united, or linked. At one point in history for people to connect with each other they had to be face to face.

7 Tactics For Content Curation Success Content curation success depends on discovering, selecting and packaging high value, sharable information that’s relevant to a specific audience. While not created from scratch, curated content is key to marketers’ content offerings. Content curation accounts for 25% of the content marketing mix according to Curata research. Content curation is a form of lean content, a well-established business model. It’s central to Top 40 radio and their Internet counterparts where the top hits of a specific musical genre are played. 10 Characteristics Of A Highly Effective Learning Environment 10 Characteristics Of A Highly Effective Learning Environment by Terry Heick Wherever we are, we’d all like to think our classrooms are “intellectually active” places. Progressive learning (like our 21st Century Model, for example) environments. Highly effective and conducive to student-centered learning. But what does that mean?

Sharing: A Responsibility of the Modern Educator In a past post blog I discussed the idea that every educator has a story and that they should share those stories: Educators are doing amazing things with their learners in spite of the standards-based and accountability-driven movements. If all educators publicized the accomplishments they had in their classrooms using technology, hands-on activities, global collaborations, project-based learning; then an informal qualitative research project would result. When educators are asked to provide evidence of efficacy to administrators, parents, other educators, funding sources, they could share these success stories. This aggregate would become the collective narrative – story of education of our times in the beginnings of the 21st century

How to Connect With Other Teachers in the Social Age In the 2012 Primary Sources Survey conducted by Scholastic and The Gates Foundation, teacher respondents claimed to spend only about 4% of each day collaborating with colleagues, while 44% of teachers surveyed responded that they would like that collaboration time to increase. Traditionally, the teaching profession has been an isolating one—if you’re not spending every minute at school teaching classes, tutoring during your breaks, or covering someone else’s class, then you’re likely spending that time disciplining, administrating testing, or scrambling to the microwave to reheat leftovers during your 15-minute lunch break. In addition, as state and district mandates swing from one end of the pendulum to the other, teachers are so completely overwhelmed with trying to follow all of the rules that they are left with no time to develop themselves and their practices. Feeling isolated and crunched for time used to mean that teachers weren’t able to collaborate. In Short

What universities have in common with record labels - Quartz If you spent the 1990s plucking songs from a stack of cassettes to make the perfect mixtape, you probably welcomed innovations of the next decade that served your favorite albums up as individual songs, often for free. The internet’s power to unbundle content sparked a rapid transformation of the music industry, which today generates just over half of the $14 billion it did in 2000—and it’s doing the same thing to higher education. The unbundling of albums in favor of individual songs was one of the biggest causes of the music industry’s decline. It cannibalized the revenue of record labels as 99-cent songs gained popularity over $20 albums. A Treasure Trove of Digital Citizenship Resources for Teachers With the increasing use of internet by our kids comes the risks that, if not addressed appropriately, would make this use disastrous. From online predators looming around waiting for their next victim to harassment and cyberbullying, these and several other issues are waiving a red flag for parents, teachers,and education stakeholders to take an immediate action and make digital citizenship an essential component in the curriculum. Kids need to be aware of these risks and should be taught on how to surf the net safely. There is a special section here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning where I have aggregated a plethora of resources that teachers can use with their students to teach them about digital citizenship. And today I come across these wonderful resources compiled by Taryn Degnan from Common Sense Media. I thought about tweeting the link without having to share it here but I know thousands of email and RSS Feed subscribers would miss it.

Personal Learning Networks for Educators: 10 Tips - Getting Smart by Guest Author - edchat, EdTech, PLN By Dr. Mark Wagner I often begin my workshop on personal learning networks (PLN) for educators by asking these questions: Who is in your learning network? Who do you learn from on a regular basis? Who do you turn to for your own professional development? Some educators are lucky enough to learn from their coworkers or colleagues at their site. Learning professionally with Google+ Communities Google educator Kimberley Hall recently presented a full day workshop for School Library Assoc of Victoria. For some delegates it was a glimpse into the possibilities of the Google Apps for Education (GAFE) tool-base, for others it was an opportunity to enhance their existing knowledge with the leadership of a dynamic trainer. Educational institutions, from primary to secondary schools, through to universities, are now using GAFE, so skill in managing the range of tools such as Google Docs, Tables, Presentations and the indispensable Google Forms with confidence is essential. The value lies in streamlining and managing workflows and documentation within the library, plus the ability to be a learning support resource for students.

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