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Scientists Selectively Erase And Restore Memories

Scientists Selectively Erase And Restore Memories

http://www.iflscience.com/brain/scientists-selectively-erase-and-restore-memories

Related:  Memory & Learning Processit's all in the mindneuroscienceBrain AugmentationBrainwashing and Social engineering

Scientists Discover A Process That Regulates Forgetting Where did I park the car? What time is my dentist appointment? Did I lock the doors? Oh no, it's Mom's birthday tomorrow! We are all very familiar with forgetting. It's incredibly frustrating, and sometimes it seems like your brain just isn't working.

How "SuperAger" Brains Are Different Than Everyone Else's Researchers working with SuperAgers—people aged 80 and up with impeccable memory—reveal how their brains look decades younger. And compared to others their age, SuperAgers have nearly 90 percent fewer brain “tangles” linked to Alzheimer’s disease. The findings were published in the Journal of Neuroscience last week. Oxytocin Enhances Pleasure of Social Interactions by Stimulating Production of “Bliss Molecule” UCI study uncovers role of oxytocin in triggering marijuana-like neurotransmitters. The hormone oxytocin, which has been associated with interpersonal bonding, may enhance the pleasure of social interactions by stimulating production of marijuana-like neurotransmitters in the brain, according to a University of California, Irvine study. The research provides the first link between oxytocin – dubbed the “love hormone” – and anandamide, which has been called the “bliss molecule” for its role in activating cannabinoid receptors in brain cells to heighten motivation and happiness.

Brain implants: Restoring memory with a microchip Synopsis A U.S.-wide team now thinks that it will see a memory device being implanted in a small number of human volunteers within two years and available to patients in five to 10 years. Summary Mind Control, Subliminal Messages and the Brainwashing of America 25th February 2016 By Carolanne Wright Contributing Writer for Wake Up World Steve Ramirez and Xu Liu: A mouse. A laser beam. A manipulated memory. Close Help with subtitles Desktop / laptop users: please make sure you have the most updated versions of your browser and Flash player, and that Flash is enabled when you visit TED.com. How brain waves guide memory formation Our brains generate a constant hum of activity: As neurons fire, they produce brain waves that oscillate at different frequencies. Long thought to be merely a byproduct of neuron activity, recent studies suggest that these waves may play a critical role in communication between different parts of the brain. A new study from MIT neuroscientists adds to that evidence. The researchers found that two brain regions that are key to learning — the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex — use two different brain-wave frequencies to communicate as the brain learns to associate unrelated objects. Whenever the brain correctly links the objects, the waves oscillate at a higher frequency, called “beta,” and when the guess is incorrect, the waves oscillate at a lower “theta” frequency. “It’s like you’re playing a computer game and you get a ding when you get it right, and a buzz when you get it wrong.

Right Side of Brain Can Compensate for Loss of Speech Following a Stroke After a debate that has lasted more than 130 years, researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have found that loss of speech from a stroke in the left hemisphere of the brain can be recovered on the back, right side of the brain. This contradicts recent notions that the right hemisphere interferes with recovery. While the findings will likely not put an immediate end to the debate, they suggest a new direction in treatment. The study, published online in Brain, is the first to look at brain structure and grey matter volume when trying to understand how speech is recovered after a stroke.

Scientists 'reactivate' Alzheimer's patients' memories Scientists in America are hopeful of a breakthrough in curing Alzheimer's, following a study that shows a way of bringing back the lost memories of dementia patients. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have erased and successfully reactivated memories in rats, offering hope that the same can be achieved with humans. The study, published next month, is the first to show the ability to selectively remove a memory and then reactivate it. This is done by stimulating nerves in the brain at frequencies that are known to weaken and strengthen the connections between nerve cells, called synapses. Roberto Malinow, a professor of neurosciences and senior author of the study, said: "We can form a memory, erase that memory and we can reactivate it, at will, by applying a stimulus that selectively strengthens or weakens synaptic connections. Photo / Thinkstock

Social engineering (security) Social engineering, in the context of information security, refers to psychological manipulation of people into performing actions or divulging confidential information. A type of confidence trick for the purpose of information gathering, fraud, or system access, it differs from a traditional "con" in that it is often one of many steps in a more complex fraud scheme. Pretexting can also be used to impersonate co-workers, police, bank, tax authorities, clergy, insurance investigators—or any other individual who could have perceived authority or right-to-know in the mind of the targeted victim. The pretexter must simply prepare answers to questions that might be asked by the victim.

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