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8 Myths That Undermine Educational Effectiveness

8 Myths That Undermine Educational Effectiveness
Certain widely-shared myths and lies about education are destructive for all of us as educators, and destructive for our educational institutions. This is the subject of 50 Myths & Lies That Threaten America’s Public Schools: The Real Crisis in Education, a new book by David Berliner and Gene Glass, two of the country’s most highly respected educational researchers. Although the book deserves to be read in its entirety, I want to focus on eight of the myths that I think are relevant to most teachers, administrators, and parents. Myth #1: Teachers Are the Most Important Influence on a Child’s Education Of course teachers are extremely important. Good teachers make a significant difference in achievement. Myth #2: Homework Boosts Achievement There is no evidence that this is true. Myth #3: Class Size Does Not Matter In an average high school, one teacher is responsible for 100-150 students on any given day. Myth #4: A Successful Program Works Everywhere Myth #6: Money Doesn’t Matter

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/myths-that-undermine-educational-effectiveness-mark-phillips

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