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100 Powerful Web Tools to Organize Your Thoughts and Ideas By Alisa Miller Whether you are a busy executive, a single parent, a freelancer working from home, a student, or a combination of these, you have probably found yourself needing help when it comes to organizing all your thoughts and ideas that occur throughout your busy day. Now you can turn to these tools found on the Internet that will help you with tasks such as note-taking, bookmarking websites, highlighting important text during online research, creating mind maps, tracking time, keeping up with appointments, collaborating with others, managing projects, and much more. Note-Taking and Documents These tools will help you take notes no matter where you find yourself needing to jot something down. Evernote. Bookmarking Whether you are doing online research or like to keep your Internet hobbies organized, these bookmarking tools will help you keep everything in order and easy to find. Del.icio.us. Mind Mapping Kayuda. Personal Wikis PBwiki. Highlighters and Sticky Notes Diigo. To-Do Lists

Memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s reversed for first time Patient 1 had two years of progressive memory loss. She was considering quitting her job, which involved analyzing data and writing reports, she got disoriented driving, and she mixed up the names of her pets. Patient 2 kept forgetting once-familiar faces at work, forgot his gym locker combination and had to have his assistants constantly remind him of his work schedule. Since it was first described over 100 years ago, Alzheimer’s disease has been without an effective treatment. That may finally be about to change: In the first, small study of a novel, personalized and comprehensive program to reverse memory loss, nine of 10 participants, including those described above, displayed subjective or objective improvement in their memories beginning within three to six months. Among the 10 were patients with memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s disease, amnestic mild cognitive impairment or subjective cognitive impairment (in which the patient reports cognitive problems).

You are what your father eats: Father's diet before conception plays crucial role in offspring's health, study suggests -- ScienceDaily Mothers get all the attention. But a study led by McGill researcher Sarah Kimmins suggests that the father's diet before conception may play an equally important role in the health of their offspring. It also raises concerns about the long-term effects of current Western diets and of food insecurity. The research focused on vitamin B9, also called folate, which is found in a range of green leafy vegetables, cereals, fruit and meats. "Despite the fact that folic acid is now added to a variety of foods, fathers who are eating high-fat, fast food diets or who are obese may not be able to use or metabolize folate in the same way as those with adequate levels of the vitamin," says Kimmins. The researchers arrived at this conclusion by working with mice, and comparing the offspring of fathers with insufficient folate in their diets with the offspring of fathers whose diets contained sufficient levels of the vitamin.

Technology for Small and One-Person Libraries: A LITA Guide - Books / Professional Development - Books for Public Librarians - Books for School Librarians This title is also available for purchase as an e-book or as a print/e-book bundle. 160 pages 6" x 9"SoftcoverISBN-13: 978-1-55570-858-0 Year Published: 2013 For those working in a small library, particularly one that may have little technical support, a foundational knowledge of technology is crucial. Table of Contents Preface by Rene J. Acknowledgments Part I Library Technology Basics Chapter 1 Technology Plan Fundamentals by Rene J. Chapter 2 Hardware and Software by Rene J. Chapter 3 Infrastructure/Networking by Scott Childers Chapter 4 Integrated Library Systems by Rachel A. Part II e-Resources Chapter 5 Fundamentals of Electronic Resources by Rachel A. Chapter 6 Licensing Electronic Resources Part III The Virtual Library Chapter 7 Web Page Development by Rene J. Chapter 8 Social Media and Social Networking by Rene J. Chapter 9 Open-Source Applications by Rachel A. Chapter 10 Digital Collections by Nicci Westbrook Chapter 11 Finding Help and Keeping Up with Changing Technology in Libraries by Rene J.

50 Awesome Search Engines Every Librarian Should Know About | Best Colleges Online by Staff Writers Students, teachers and the public turn to their librarians for help researching everything from technology to genealogy to homework help and lesson plans. Even if your library is equipped with subscriptions and memberships to top of the line databases and online journals, you’ve probably had to get creative during a patron’s requested search for something unfamiliar. Meta Search and Multi Search Engines These meta search and multi search engines can search numerous engines and sites at once, maximizing the number of results you get each time you conduct a search. Ms. Multimedia and Interactive For help finding pictures, podcasts, music and shareware, use these search engines. Metacafe: Find videos on this site if you want a change from YouTube.Google Play Music: Patrons looking for music can use this search engine, which “lets you listen to any song or band.” Google Search Engines A Google search doesn’t just mean typing in a keyword on the homepage and seeing what pops up.

Eating green leafy vegetables keeps mental abilities sharp -- ScienceDaily Something as easy as adding more spinach, kale, collards and mustard greens to your diet could help slow cognitive decline, according to new research. The study also examined the nutrients responsible for the effect, linking vitamin K consumption to slower cognitive decline for the first time. "Losing one's memory or cognitive abilities is one of the biggest fears for people as they get older," said Martha Clare Morris, Sc.D., assistant provost for community research at Rush University Medical Center and leader of the research team. "Since declining cognitive ability is central to Alzheimer's disease and dementias, increasing consumption of green leafy vegetables could offer a very simple, affordable and non-invasive way of potentially protecting your brain from Alzheimer's disease and dementia." "Our study identified some very novel associations," said Morris, who will present the research at the American Society for Nutrition (ASN) Annual Meeting during Experimental Biology 2015.

Study finds cancer link for muscle-building supplements | News from Brown A new study associates taking muscle-building supplements with an increased risk of testicular cancer. Men who used such pills and powders were more likely to have developed testicular cancer than those who did not, especially if they started before age 25, took more than one supplement, or used the supplements for three or more years. PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Men who reported taking muscle-building supplements, such as pills and powders with creatine or androstenedione, reported a significantly higher likelihood of having developed testicular cancer than men who did not use such supplements, according to a new study in the British Journal of Cancer. Moreover, said study senior author Tongzhang Zheng, the associated testicular germ cell cancer risk was especially high among men who started using supplements before age 25, those who used multiple supplements and those who used them for years. “Testicular cancer is a very mysterious cancer,” he said. Testing the odds The U.S.

sp.Blog Free login to any site It's simple! This service is made for you to save your time on registration for many sites. You can not register at all sites, so just type the name of site for which you need to enter login and password and click «Get». Tips: Our project is constantly developing and we try to keep our database in actual state, use more of our services. So, we will try to find for you the latest logins to any site! In Alzheimer's mice, memory restored with cancer drug -- ScienceDaily Memory and as well as connections between brain cells were restored in mice with a model of Alzheimer's given an experimental cancer drug, Yale School of Medicine researchers reported in the journal Annals of Neurology. The drug, AZD05030, developed by Astra Zeneca proved disappointing in treating solid tumors but appears to block damage triggered during the formation of amyloid-beta plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. The new study, funded by an innovative National Institutes of Health (NIH) program to test failed drugs on different diseases, has led to the launch of human trials to test the efficacy of AZD05030 in Alzheimer's patients. "With this treatment, cells under bombardment by beta amyloid plaques show restored synaptic connections and reduced inflammation, and the animal's memory, which was lost during the course of the disease, comes back," said Stephen M.

The contagious thought that could kill you Beware the scaremongers. Like a witch doctor’s spell, their words might be spreading modern plagues. It’s a consistent phenomenon, but medicine has never really dealt with it We have long known that expectations of a malady can be as dangerous as a virus. In the same way that voodoo shamans could harm their victims through the power of suggestion, priming someone to think they are ill can often produce the actual symptoms of a disease. But it is now becoming clear just how easily those dangerous beliefs can spread through gossip and hearsay – with potent effect. A killer joke Doctors have long known that beliefs can be deadly – as demonstrated by a rather nasty student prank that went horribly wrong. While anecdotes like this abound, modern researchers had mostly focused on the mind’s ability to heal, not harm – the “placebo effect”, from the Latin for “I will please”. Over the last 10 years, doctors have shown that this nocebo effect – Latin for “I will harm” – is very common.

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