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The Subplot - Not Second Place, but Side by Side

The Subplot - Not Second Place, but Side by Side
There is one element in plotting our story that we sometimes forget or neglect—the subplot. The subplot is what rounds out a novel or screenplay, informing it with another shade of emotional colour to deliver a satisfying and entertaining experience. It is the parallel narrative that allows the writer to explore theme, deepen characterisation, add tension or allow some relief. The subplot helps us understand the characters a bit better and gives a better sense of pace. Love and other pursuits. In a thriller, the love story is often the subplot. A great subplot should help you sustain your plot and illuminate the central characters. Start writing your book with our Writers Write - how to write a book - course. by Anthony Ehlers Anthony has facilitated courses for Writers Write since 2007.

http://writerswrite.co.za/the-subplot-not-second-place-but-side-by-side

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The Art of Conflict by Rachael Thomas Happy Monday! Rachael Thomas explains why conflict plays a crucial role in a story. Every story needs conflict, but what exactly is conflict and why does it matter in romance? Conflict is an incompatibility between the objectives of your characters and is needed because it creates tension in your story. In short, it’s what keeps your characters apart emotionally despite the physical attraction they have for each other. A character with a believable conflict will keep the reader turning those pages to see what happens next. How to Rock Your Story's Tension photo cred: © Sergei Zolkin via Unsplash Today we’re talkin’ tension. No matter your story’s plot or genre, you need to know how to nail tension in your fiction.

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the basic plots in literature Example Questions That Can Be Answered Using This FAQ I’ve heard there are only 7 (or 5, 20, 36…) basic plots (or themes) in all of literature. What are they? Let’s ditch the dangerous idea that life is a story ... ‘Each of us constructs and lives a “narrative”,’ wrote the British neurologist Oliver Sacks, ‘this narrative is us’. Likewise the American cognitive psychologist Jerome Bruner: ‘Self is a perpetually rewritten story.’ And: ‘In the end, we become the autobiographical narratives by which we “tell about” our lives.’

Monomyth Joseph Campbell's monomyth, or the hero's journey, is a basic pattern that its proponents argue is found in many narratives from around the world. This widely distributed pattern was described by Campbell in The Hero with a Thousand Faces (1949).[1] Campbell, an enthusiast of novelist James Joyce, borrowed the term monomyth from Joyce's Finnegans Wake.[2] Campbell held that numerous myths from disparate times and regions share fundamental structures and stages, which he summarized in The Hero with a Thousand Faces: A hero ventures forth from the world of common day into a region of supernatural wonder: fabulous forces are there encountered and a decisive victory is won: the hero comes back from this mysterious adventure with the power to bestow boons on his fellow man.[3]

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3 Types of Character Arcs: Choose the Best for Your Novel How Does Your Character Change? You know your character must change somehow over the course of your novel. But how? And more than that, how do you sync the changes with the external plot?

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