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6 Tips for Getting Started with Genius Hour

6 Tips for Getting Started with Genius Hour
Posted 05/22/2014 2:36PM | Last Commented 02/02/2015 11:36AM Genius hour is a great way to allow students to drive their own personalized instruction but where to begin such a big project? How to Get Started There are a lot of resources out there already, and most of the teachers that are embarking on this process are willing to share what they have or help you problem solve. The following all have something to offer: Practical Tips Face to Face time is invaluable: While the students are working independently you are still there helping them focus and problem solve.

http://www.edutopia.org/groups/personalized-learning/802456

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Reinventing School From the Ground Up For Inquiry Learning By Thom Markham A grave miscalculation exists in the minds of many educators: That inquiry-based learning, project based learning, and 21st century competencies can flourish in industrial model schools. Under this world view, the inquiry goals of the Common Core State Standards are “strategies” to be added to the existing list of classroom techniques, while skills like collaboration, communication, or creativity can be taught despite 43-minute periods, desks in rows, and pacing guides set in stone. In other words, reaching the top of Bloom’s Taxonomy is important, but less so than maintaining regimental order. But what we know—from industry and neuroscience—is that organizational structure, environment, and human performance are deeply intertwined. It is inevitable that schools must be completely redesigned if society wants to tap the wellsprings of creativity and exploration that the industrial system subdues.

We Need Schools... Not Factories Winner Of the TED Prize 2013 In a special edition of TEDWeekends, TED and The Huffington Post are partnering to co-premiere a talk by this year's TED Prize winner. The TEDTalk by the winner is accompanied by an original blog post, along with new op-eds, thoughts and responses from the HuffPost and TED communities. Watch the talk above, read the blog post and tell us your thoughts below. How to Get Started With Genius Hour for Elementary Classrooms? – Kleinspiration I believe that every single child is gifted and that every kid has a talent which we as educators should help uncover. This is not easy when you have a curriculum to follow and tons of material to teach. But that given we need to make time to work with kids in a different and more creative setting.

How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples How Teaching Is Changing: 15 New Realities Every Educator Faces by Terry Heick It’s tempting to say that no matter how much technology pushes on education, every teacher will always need to know iconic teacher practices like assessment, curriculum design, classroom management, and cognitive coaching. This may end up being true–how education changes in the next 20 years is a choice rather than the inevitable tidal wave of social and technological change it’s easy to sit back and wait for. Think of the very limited change in education since 2000 compared to the automotive industry, computer industry, retail consumer industry, etc.

8 Ideas That Will Permanently Break Education As We Know It 9 Ideas Education Is Having Trouble Responding To by Terry Heick Ed note: This post has been updated from a post we published this summer. Genius Hour with Second Graders Genius Hour? Yeah, I could do that with my second graders. There are few projects that truly changed the culture of my classroom–this is one of them. Both 20timeineducation.com and geniushour.com provide a quick primer on Genius Hour, aka 20 Time, aka 20% Time, aka FedEx Days. All right, I’m assuming you know about what Genius Hour is know. I found that this project is one of the rare moments in school where students are given choice in curriculum.

Take aim at innovation, with students in the center In September 2012, I packed up my Prius, left my patient wife, and drove around the United States for 89 days and 10,000 miles visiting 64 schools of every flavor and size to find out how they are preparing students for a rapidly changing world. I asked questions and recorded learning with more than 600 teachers, administrators and students. In setting up the complex matrix of this trip, many of my hosts asked, “What would you like to see when you are here?” The journeys of discovery in my life have started with open goals and few preconceptions, so I left the agendas as open ended as possible, with one caveat: I was not interested in seeing a 1:1 laptop program or talking with teachers about their tablet rollouts. As others have said, technology in learning should be as ubiquitous as air, and there is nothing innovative about students and teachers breathing.

50 Crazy Ideas To Change Education 50 Crazy Ideas To Change Education by Terry Heick Below are 50 ideas for a new education. Note, most of these are about education as a system rather than learning itself, but that’s okay. It’s often the infrastructure of learning that obscures anyway. Few of them may work; even fewer would work together, and that’s okay too. Genius Hour Ideas On Friday my classes made their genius hour topic selections. At the beginning of the class I told them that I was changing the name of our time together from “Passion Projects” to “Genius Hour”. They seemed to appreciate the thought of me thinking they were all geniuses. I pulled up our brainstorming pages from last week and went through them again. Framework for 21st Century Learning P21's Framework for 21st Century Learning was developed with input from teachers, education experts, and business leaders to define and illustrate the skills and knowledge students need to succeed in work, life and citizenship, as well as the support systems necessary for 21st century learning outcomes. It has been used by thousands of educators and hundreds of schools in the U.S. and abroad to put 21st century skills at the center of learning. The P21 Framework represents both 21st century student outcomes (as represented by the arches of the rainbow) and support systems (as represented by the pools at the bottom). Tweet the Framework

What Would Be a Radically Different Vision of School? There’s no shortage of different opinions about how the education system should adapt to a shifting world and a future with unknown demands, but for the most part, only two dominant narratives of education reform have emerged. “The predominant narrative is that schools are broken,” said veteran educator and author Will Richardson recently at a gathering of teachers at Educon. “Our test scores aren’t great and kids aren’t learning what they need to be successful.” This narrative is dominated by those who believe schools need to be organized and funded differently, but Richardson claims that the essential outcomes of improved test scores and other measurable results are the same as the current system. “Different isn’t really different,” Richardson said.

Genius Hour Project Introductions - Genius Hour How to Introduce Genius Hour Projects The introduction of genius hour projects to your students needs to be amazing! This is likely the first time that your students have ever been told that they can work on anything they want within the walls of the school. You don’t want to mess up this incredible moment. Add Suspense Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning If kids can access information from sources other than school, and if school is no longer the only place where information lives, what, then happens to the role of this institution? “Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind,” said Diana Laufenberg, who taught history at the progressive public school Science Leadership Academy for many years. Laufenberg provided some insight into how she guided students to find their own learning paths at school, and enumerated some of these ideas at SXSWEdu last week.

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